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Old 11-30-2009, 05:00 AM
 
519 posts, read 892,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Hmm. I've only seen Gabriel as a boy's name. As for Rene, it's one e for the male version and 2 e's for the female version.
The spelling only makes a difference when it is written not spoken, in Australia there is a stronger 'blokey' culture.

Men don't allow their sons to be called Gabriel or Rene - these are only the sons of immigrants usually.

They get teased mercilessly, I have seen it myself.
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Old 11-30-2009, 09:59 PM
 
3 posts, read 3,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TumbleBug View Post
The spelling only makes a difference when it is written not spoken, in Australia there is a stronger 'blokey' culture.

Men don't allow their sons to be called Gabriel or Rene - these are only the sons of immigrants usually.

They get teased mercilessly, I have seen it myself.
Your Aussie 'blokes' should be embracing multi-cultural names. From what I've seen they're predominantly called Matt, Steve, Dave and Andy (Which admittedly makes things easier when you forget someone's name).

I knew a rather large Aborigine guy called Kylie (as in the boomerang)....I don't think he ran into the same kinds of problems that Gabriel and Rene did...


I would tend to pronounce Rene and Renee differently? Does Rene not have more emphasis on the Re?
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Old 11-30-2009, 10:53 PM
 
Location: ATL suburb
1,366 posts, read 3,606,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TumbleBug View Post
The spelling only makes a difference when it is written not spoken, in Australia there is a stronger 'blokey' culture.

Men don't allow their sons to be called Gabriel or Rene - these are only the sons of immigrants usually.

They get teased mercilessly, I have seen it myself.
Gabriel is most definitely a boy's name (with the accent on the first syllable), while Gabrielle (accent on the last syllable) is a girl's name.

Rene (with an accent mark on the e) is also a male name, common in French and Hatian communities. That is different from Renee, which is the spelling for a female.

Any teasing over those would be from ignorant buffoons.

Other (originally male or unisex) names, such as Kelley, Leslie, Mischa, while no longer popular for males, shouldn't be singled out as being stupid or effeminate either.

I can't believe this is an actual thread.
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Old 11-30-2009, 11:14 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,443,352 times
Reputation: 1957
Quote:
Originally Posted by TumbleBug View Post
The french sometimes call their boys Renee/ Rene - which is strictly a girls name in Australia where I live.

In school I saw boys called Rene and Gabriel teased so badly they would lie about their names to new people.

It's unfair to the child IMO.
Gabriel (as in the Archangel) is a feminine name?
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Old 12-01-2009, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Texas
8,668 posts, read 19,927,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhaven View Post
My husbands name is Jody and he hates it. Anytime he meets someone new there is a joke made about how it's usually a girls name
Here in the Dallas area, we have a (very attractive) male radio personality/newsman named Jody.
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Old 12-01-2009, 09:34 AM
 
5,905 posts, read 5,082,987 times
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Most of the names discussed in this thread are not at all unusual for boys if one takes the time to look up their history:

Stacy - derived from the Greek name Eustace
Jody - English nickname for either Joseph or Jude
Robin - English variant of Robert, dating from medieval times
Francis - Latin for "Frenchman" or "free man"; anglicized variant of Francois.
Carroll - Old German, meaning "man". Anglicized variant of Charles.
Whitney - Old English for "white island".
Kimberly - Old English for "Cyneburg's meadow".
Ashley - Old English "ash meadow". (anyone seen Gone With the Wind lately?)
Lindsey/Lindsay - Old English "Lincoln's marsh".
Dale - Old English "valley".
Shirley - distinctly male before Charlotte Brontė's 1849 novel Shirley.
Kelly - Irish/Gaelic in origin, meaning "descendant of Ceallach".
Shannon - Gaelic "old, ancient".
Tracy - Irish/Gaelic "warlike".
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Old 12-01-2009, 08:27 PM
 
8,240 posts, read 14,907,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TumbleBug View Post
The spelling only makes a difference when it is written not spoken, in Australia there is a stronger 'blokey' culture.

Men don't allow their sons to be called Gabriel or Rene - these are only the sons of immigrants usually.

They get teased mercilessly, I have seen it myself.
So what? If it's their culture, the kids should be taught to be proud- they usually are. I would be more ashamed, personally, to have a kid with a 'blokey' culture who made fun of other people's names.
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Old 12-02-2009, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Moon Over Palmettos
5,975 posts, read 17,156,958 times
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I spoke to a man named Dana. When he first got on the phone, I was shocked to hear a man's voice.
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Old 12-02-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,007,171 times
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Dana doesn't surprise me. I used to live in Southern California and knew that Dana Point was named for Richard Henry Dana. I think every kid in the area had to read Three Years Before the Mast in elementary school and visit the Pilgrim, a shipped docked in the harbor.

I write sales proposals and frequently have to enclose cover letters. If the purchaser's name is unisex or unfamiliar, I always call and ask a receptionist if "Dana Smith" is a Mr. or Ms.
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Old 12-02-2009, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Penobscot Bay, the best place in Maine!
1,891 posts, read 5,150,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
There it is! James King is a woman.
(And that's not her given name-lol!)
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