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Old 05-13-2009, 12:45 PM
 
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I can relate. My fourth-grader met her school reading goal for the entire year in November. We spend a LOT of time at the public library, and it's common our family to have forty or so books out at any one time. We are all really big readers.

I suggest the Newberry Award winners. I've enjoyed many books from this list myself. One of our family favorites is Long Way from Chicago. It's a great read-aloud.

Here's link to the Newberry Award winner list.
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Old 05-13-2009, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Aberdeen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
What is inappropriate about HP and Eragon?
My problem with HP... he continually lies and the gist seems to be that it's okay. I have a problem with my kids lying to me. But there are several parts of the books that offer great discussion starters.

The Eargon series... premarital sex, disrespect to elders but my biggest problem is with the beginning of Brisinger. That graphic discription of the self mutilation and just the overall dark tone to the novel... I would not recommend it. My son has read the first two and we have also had some really good conversations over some of these topics.

My rule of thumb is if I can't read it/watch it with my four year old, I won't recommend it to others. I once took the preachers son (at the time he was 16) to a movie that turned out to have quite a bit of nudity (rated PG-13, this was before I realized that PG-13 is the new R) so I am more discerning about what I recommend to others. I see the value in both series, if nothing more than they get kids excited about reading.
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Old 05-13-2009, 03:23 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,450,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicoleJ View Post
Not sure if this should go here or the book forum. Feel free to move it mods.

My 9 year old is crazy smart. She reads approx. 10 chapter books/week and is starting to get tired of the ones for her age b/c they're so short and so many of them are along the same lines.

She's been trying to venture into the YA section @ the library lately. She's managed to find some books that are still ok for her to read, but then Sunday (she went w/ her dad who of course paid no attention, lol) she brought home Paula Danziger ( ) and also a Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants book. Fortunately she's really honest and showed them to me to find out if she was allowed to read them.

What age did you let your kids move up to bigger books and what books were they? I'm thinking next year when she hits 10 I might introduce her to Judy Blume. I know I read them in 4th grade. But Paula Danziger? NO WAY. Not till she's a teen.
I am answering before reading through the thread, so forgive me if someone has mentioned my suggestions already.

I have a 10 year old and I have started reading Newberry Medal books and buying them for him or checking them out of the library. He is also allowed to read what he wants (within reason as you know) but I'd like to have good books available for him when he finishes.

Our library has a 10 year old who started a book club and we go to that once a month, where he gets more ideas. He is starting the Pendragon series and has checked out but not started Eragon, and has recently asked me to put "The Lightning Thief" on hold; I need to read about it.

We are listening to "A Wrinkle in Time" on cd right now. Before that, we listened to "A Bridge to Terabithia".

One thing with those Newberry books is that there is often a tragedy of some sort in them - you may want to read them so you can talk to your dd about them. My son really enjoys when we can discuss the books he is reading. It started with me reading them first, and now he will bring me a book he has just finished and ask me to read it.

Another great suggestion I saw somewhere was nonfiction as a good way for advanced readers to satisfy their need to read without reading inappropriate material.
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Old 05-13-2009, 03:30 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,450,320 times
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Originally Posted by cislga View Post

We are currently reading To Kill A Mockingbird.

One of my favorites at her age was The Island of the Blue Dolphins.
TKAM is my favorite book.

I just read Island of the Blue Dolphins for the first time ever and it was a great book!
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Old 05-13-2009, 03:35 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,450,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicoleJ View Post
sorry to be responding so late. I've been studying for a test and even though I don't take it for 3 more hours, I've forgotten everything. sigh.

anyway, I don't believe in books being inappropriate b/c of magic or whatever. Only b/c of maturity levels and the amount of sex, drugs and violence in a book in relation to the age of the reader. For example, I don't think she needs to be reading "Go Ask Alice" at age 9.

I did try to get her interested in fantasy books (b/c fantasy and romance are my favorite genres - I am THRILLED w/ paranormal romance, lol). But she just doesn't like it. Even though she likes (not loves) HP, she doesn't want to read the books. No Magic Treehouse, Rick Riordan (I love his books), etc.

She's on a 7th grade reading level. She likes this new series about these middle school girls who have started a bakery. I think it's called the Dish series? I've looked through them and they're decent. She loves them. She wasn't impressed w/ Little House books (obviously she gets her craziness from her dad's side of the family, lol). I might try Heidi. I liked that. She's read several American Girl books, Just Grace, etc. She will NOT read books where fictional animals are sentient. I don't know why.
I remembered another one. My son read "Number the Stars" in school this year. He liked it - that is definitely one you want to read first or at the same time so you can discuss it. It is about Denmark during the German occupation.
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Old 05-13-2009, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
1,289 posts, read 2,328,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IHOP View Post
My problem with HP... he continually lies and the gist seems to be that it's okay. I have a problem with my kids lying to me. But there are several parts of the books that offer great discussion starters
A bit off topic, but apparently you missed the whole "I must not tell lies" bit in the fifth book.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lisdol View Post
Another great suggestion I saw somewhere was nonfiction as a good way for advanced readers to satisfy their need to read without reading inappropriate material.
I think you'd have to be careful with this method because I've read a great deal of nonfiction that has a lot of content inappropriate to readers of a certain age.
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Old 05-13-2009, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Northern VA
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I think TKAM is a little old for her right now. but I did love that book.

Lisdol, she read about Anne Frank a month or so ago. Next year she's going to read her diary.

I think I will try the Newberry books and talk to her school librarian. Thanks!
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Old 05-14-2009, 12:53 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,450,320 times
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If she has already been exposed to Anne Frank then Number the Stars might be interesting and appropriate for her.
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Old 05-14-2009, 01:11 PM
 
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I was also going to suggest checking the Newberry list as well as the Nancy Drew series. Those were both already mentioned. What about the Wizard of Oz (the original, not the abridged) and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory? She might was well learn young that the books are always better than the movies!
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Old 05-18-2009, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Aberdeen
168 posts, read 257,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puru View Post
A bit off topic, but apparently you missed the whole "I must not tell lies" bit in the fifth book.

Sorry for the late reply, I have been away from computer access for several days. Normally I would let something like this drop, but this is exactly why I have a problem with the books: Harry was punished with the whole "I must not tell lies" punishment for the one time he told the truth and went to the adults for help. See to me there is a message here that adults are not to be trusted. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed the books, we selectively read them as a family (meaning we read them, discussed points such as the above, and I skipped over inappropriate material such as the pre-marital sex in Eragon).
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