U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-23-2009, 08:00 AM
 
1,986 posts, read 3,471,031 times
Reputation: 1289

Advertisements

Prayer Death

This is the latest on the little girl whose mother and others prayed over her while she died of diabetes at the age of 11. The mother called 911 AFTER the child passed. Why would she do that? She didn't have faith in modern medicine as her daughter laid there unable to move or speak, but she suddenly gained confidence when there was no longer life in her daughter's body?

How ironic her epiphany came one minute too late. Will it be the same for this mother who is on the run with her son who could be cured with modern medicine?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-23-2009, 08:04 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 35,041,567 times
Reputation: 42372
This morning, Good Morning America had a small segment on the boy and his mother. They interviewed a young man named Billy Best, who had Hodgkins at 16, ran away from his family to escape chemo and survived with the use of vitamins and supplements. I thought the story made a nice balance to all the recrimination.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 08:16 AM
 
1,986 posts, read 3,471,031 times
Reputation: 1289
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
He's the patient. The patient should not require a reason to REFUSE treatment, if that IS his or her desire.
That's just plain insane. He is a mentally challenged 13 year old boy. He is incapable of reading, how could he possibly be capable of understanding the consequences of not getting medical treatment for his now growing tumor in his chest?
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanandpumpkin View Post
... I've refused treatment on behalf of my kids. I don't let them get flouride at the dentist's office, we've declined some vaccinations, and I've said "no thanks" when offered an antibiotic for my son's "sinus infection" (aka runny nose that cleared up within a few days on its own). My answer to "should parents be able to refuse treatment for thier kids?" is YES.
Question: Since you refuse treatment and do not medicate for fevers, etc., why even go through the expense (insurance, out-of-pocket, medicaid, whatever) of taking your child to the doctor for his opinion? If you're going to disregard his advice, what good is he? Why go at all?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,170,734 times
Reputation: 3481
Quote:
Originally Posted by miasmommy View Post
I'm sorry but I firmly believe that these parents just like any other parents have the right

Do you believe in religious freedom or don't you? The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution says, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof."
Well, at least they're being consistent. The Courts have ordered blood transfusions for minor children of Jehovah's Witnesses, as well.

I'm with whoever it was upstream who voiced a personal conflict ovver the issue, myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 10:00 AM
 
2,838 posts, read 8,854,883 times
Reputation: 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by stormy night View Post

Question: Since you refuse treatment and do not medicate for fevers, etc., why even go through the expense (insurance, out-of-pocket, medicaid, whatever) of taking your child to the doctor for his opinion? If you're going to disregard his advice, what good is he? Why go at all?
I wouldn't refuse all treatments... when my daughter had an allergic reaction to something, I went in and got a referral to an allergist, but I did not accept the pediatrician's advice to "go get some Zyrtec and don't worry about what she's allergic to, as long as that controls it." Many parents would do just that... but I wanted to know the cause of the problem, and not just cover it up with a bandaid.

As far as the sinus infection (or lack thereof), my son had woken up with a seemingly unprovoked spurting bloody nose. It was a Friday, we had recently moved to a new area, and I got nervous, so I took him in. By the time we got there, it was just a normal runny nose. The ped looked at him and said "here's an antibiotic, he probably has a sinus infection." I said that I'd rather not use the antibiotic, so he suggested I simply wait a few days and see what happens. By Monday, his "sinus infection" was gone. If it hadn't been a Friday, then I might not have gone in right away, but I liked having the assurance that he was okay before the weekend after such a nerve-wracking wake-up call. Making a conscious decision to refuse certain treatments does not mean that you're a negligent parent who does not take appropriate steps to care for your child's health. My husband had just started his new job, and our insurance had not kicked in yet, so it was out of pocket... thankfully, though, money was not an issue that I had to worry about when making a decision about whether to take him in to be seen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
2,868 posts, read 8,454,851 times
Reputation: 1500
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanandpumpkin View Post
I wouldn't refuse all treatments... when my daughter had an allergic reaction to something, I went in and got a referral to an allergist, but I did not accept the pediatrician's advice to "go get some Zyrtec and don't worry about what she's allergic to, as long as that controls it." Many parents would do just that... but I wanted to know the cause of the problem, and not just cover it up with a bandaid.

As far as the sinus infection (or lack thereof), my son had woken up with a seemingly unprovoked spurting bloody nose. It was a Friday, we had recently moved to a new area, and I got nervous, so I took him in. By the time we got there, it was just a normal runny nose. The ped looked at him and said "here's an antibiotic, he probably has a sinus infection." I said that I'd rather not use the antibiotic, so he suggested I simply wait a few days and see what happens. By Monday, his "sinus infection" was gone. If it hadn't been a Friday, then I might not have gone in right away, but I liked having the assurance that he was okay before the weekend after such a nerve-wracking wake-up call. Making a conscious decision to refuse certain treatments does not mean that you're a negligent parent who does not take appropriate steps to care for your child's health. My husband had just started his new job, and our insurance had not kicked in yet, so it was out of pocket... thankfully, though, money was not an issue that I had to worry about when making a decision about whether to take him in to be seen.

If you as so bent on 'refusing treatment', why did you take him there in the first place? Exactly what where you seeking from this doctor?


Refusing antibiotics or allergy medicine is a whole other ball of wax. Those are not life saving medications. This "mother" is refusing a drug that will save her sons life. She is his death wish.

I do think parents should have the right to refuse meds...but not meds that will save a life...by a 90-95% margin.

Point is...if you were told your child has a 5% chance of living unless they take this med...would you? This has nothing to do with a fever or a sinus infection. This boy is DYING.

Last edited by *Danielle*; 05-23-2009 at 11:56 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 12:04 PM
 
2,838 posts, read 8,854,883 times
Reputation: 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by *Danielle* View Post
If you as so bent on 'refusing treatment', why did you take him there in the first place? Exactly what where you seeking from this doctor?


Refusing antibiotics or allergy medicine is a whole other ball of wax. Those are not life saving medications. This "mother" is refusing a drug that will save her sons life. She is his death wish.

I do think parents should have the right to refuse meds...but not meds that will save a life...by a 90-95% margin.

Point is...if you were told your child has a 5% chance of living unless they take this med...would you? This has nothing to do with a fever or a sinus infection. This boy is DYING.
As I said in the post that you quoted, I simply wanted some reassurance before the weekend. I was scared when he woke up spurting blood; by the time I saw the doctor, I had calmed down and realized that it really wasn't an emergency.

And yes, I agree with you: of course I'd give my child chemo if those were the odds! I'm just wondering where the line is drawn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 12:42 PM
 
1,986 posts, read 3,471,031 times
Reputation: 1289
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanandpumpkin View Post

And yes, I agree with you: of course I'd give my child chemo if those were the odds! I'm just wondering where the line is drawn.
The line is between life and death. That is not difficult to grasp. When life is an option, the choice should be life as long as it's livable.

It's one thing choosing for oneself, but choosing for a child is quite another. This mother is making the decision for her son to relinquish his life for the sake of her beliefs. And her beliefs are not on solid ground.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
427 posts, read 1,212,389 times
Reputation: 351
I think that when the child's life is in danger then the courts need to step in. The same for courts that order blood transfusions for the children of jehovah's witnesses. They are a child, they are not really old enough to make a decision based on religion. It is one thing for an adult to refuse treatment, but a child is not able to make medical decisions.

My little brother is adopted from foster care, we got him when he was 10 weeks old, after spending weeks in a hospital because his parent fed him large amounts of salt, until his body shut down from severe dehydration. He barely lived. In my eyes allowing a child to die from a curable illness, or from something that can be managed like diabetes is the same as activly trying to kill your child.

Doing nothing is the same as killing them. These are not children with incurable diseases. And now thins mother stands a far greater chance of losing custody of her child. She is putting her beliefs on the child.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2009, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Nova Scotia
458 posts, read 1,138,175 times
Reputation: 444
This is touchy, because as a parent I feel I would do whatever it took to save my child. But on the other hand if my child looked at me and said "Mom I can not do this, please stop" I may agree, ONLY after I fully educate them. To make sure they understood what they are asking. But again back to doing everything to save my child. This is a question you can not actually answer until you are in that situation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top