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Old 05-24-2009, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,744 posts, read 37,239,681 times
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Default Unusual Rules at your house?

Have you imposed any unusual rules of behavior in your house, that you think are not applied in most other households?

I had a "no shouting" rule. If you want to talk to somebody in another room, you get up and go to the other room and talk. No shouting from room to room. If you answer the phone and its for somebody else, you go to where they are and tell them the call is for them. (We had no portable phones ln those days.) The rule applied to everybody, If my daughter was upstairs, I'd have to go upstairs to tell her supper's ready. It made the house wonderfully peaceful, and everybody seemed to enjoy all the face-to-face contact.
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Old 05-24-2009, 07:41 PM
 
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In our family when I was a kid -- and still now, even though I'm 38 -- the proper response to having our mother call our name was never "What?" or even a more respectful, "Yes, ma'am?" but rather "Coming!"

Mom would call to us and we'd call back, "What?" And there'd be silence. Then a little while later, another call to us, followed by a louder, more irritated "What?!?" Followed by more silence. Then there'd be another call, and this time we got wise and our response was this grudging, resentful, "Coming!" as we went to see what she wanted. Half the time she was just calling to ask us to fetch her a glass of water. Ha!

My mom and I joke about this today, but she still does it. And I still respond, like a good little girl, with "Coming!"
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Old 05-25-2009, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Australia
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I think these days that many rules that would have been considered normal or sensible in the past are now considered strict or restrictive. The thing I find interesting is that kids still come to our place and they accept the rules and so even though they may be ratbags at home, they try to follow the rules here. (Yes I know kids are always better behaved at someone elses house).

TV off when a visitor arrives.
No TV after school until 5pm. Use the hard disk recorder if you want to watch after school TV.
If a child comes into a room and wants to interrupt an adult they can say mum or dad only once then wait.
No ice cream or soft drink except for special occasions. So visiting kids get offered fruit - remember that.
Visiting kids have to call us Mr and Mrs...
We also have a family uniform - its just a fun thing but each year we buy matching T shirts in a colour or style and from time to time we will wear them together.
And we smack our kids. (ooh that will up set the PC brigade)
oh and they have a bed time and well during term time, they go to bed at bed time. Homework not finished - well do it in the morning.
We say grace before the evening meal.
You get called for dinner once. If you arrive after the meal has been served, you miss out. Tough luck. Go hungry. It happens about once a year per child maybe not even that.
No TV or computers in bed rooms. Amazes me howmany kids have TV's and or computers in bed rooms.

So I guess we are pretty unusual.
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Old 05-25-2009, 05:12 AM
 
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we do, but they don't do much good with a disabled kid, its like pissing in the wind sometimes. More often than not its the parents adjusting to the kid so that the kid won't want to (or is unable to) do those things anymore.

In our case he couldn't get out of bed before 7:30AM. But if anyone was downstairs he'd do it anyway and be very disruptive to that person's "peaceful time". As such we moved our laptops, and work stuff upstairs so that when he gets up and sees no one in there to yap at, he goes back to his room to entertain himself like we want him to do that early in the AM. That also gives us our peace until we are ready mentally (which isn't very much, but to have your thoughts just ripped short and have to suddenly without thought to what you may have been doing and without warning have to concentrate on what the Transformers did in a dream for the next 1/2 hour is a stressful and unwanted start to the day).

Spent a couple years trying to get him to follow that rule before we just gave up and moved our stuff upstairs. Less stress for everyone even if thats not the setup we really wanted, it was the only thing that made him stay in his room that early in the morning. (lack of stimulus)
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Old 05-25-2009, 05:15 AM
 
1,577 posts, read 2,335,442 times
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Each their own, but that wouldn't work at our place Not at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aidxen View Post
I think these days that many rules that would have been considered normal or sensible in the past are now considered strict or restrictive. The thing I find interesting is that kids still come to our place and they accept the rules and so even though they may be ratbags at home, they try to follow the rules here. (Yes I know kids are always better behaved at someone elses house).

TV off when a visitor arrives.
No TV after school until 5pm. Use the hard disk recorder if you want to watch after school TV.
If a child comes into a room and wants to interrupt an adult they can say mum or dad only once then wait.
No ice cream or soft drink except for special occasions. So visiting kids get offered fruit - remember that.
Visiting kids have to call us Mr and Mrs...
We also have a family uniform - its just a fun thing but each year we buy matching T shirts in a colour or style and from time to time we will wear them together.
And we smack our kids. (ooh that will up set the PC brigade)
oh and they have a bed time and well during term time, they go to bed at bed time. Homework not finished - well do it in the morning.
We say grace before the evening meal.
You get called for dinner once. If you arrive after the meal has been served, you miss out. Tough luck. Go hungry. It happens about once a year per child maybe not even that.
No TV or computers in bed rooms. Amazes me howmany kids have TV's and or computers in bed rooms.

So I guess we are pretty unusual.
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Old 05-25-2009, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Maine
650 posts, read 1,398,764 times
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We have a no light saber in the living room rule. The kids are free to use the force in any other room of the house though.
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Old 05-25-2009, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Here... for now
1,747 posts, read 1,814,791 times
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I don't know if it's unusual, but we have a shoes-free home. I don't dictate that people MUST remove shoes, but we do sort of subtly encourage it. Not only does it keep a home much cleaner, we feel it invites more informality. We're not stuffy, formal people.

All the kid visitors did it, even if it wasn't a rule at their homes. The did it as a show of respect for the way we wanted to treat OUR home. I liked that . Most of the adult visitors removed shoes, too. But not all.

Other than the shoe thing, ours was/is a pretty loosey-goosey household.
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:00 AM
 
535 posts, read 517,199 times
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Default I'm not sure these are that unusual?

After shower, but before bed, he has quiet time to reflect on the day. He can read or play with Legos but it must be in his playroom or room and he must be QUIET. I go with the notion bodies in motion tend to stay that way.

On days he has swim meets, he is not allowed to eat junk during the meet but he can have a junk food feast after he has swam/swum all of his events.

I am a huge proponent of sleep and if he stayed up late the previous night he must go to bed early the next. If he would sleep in I would get rid of this rule but his time clock is set so well he wakes up same time if he goes to sleep at 11 PM or 8 PM.

****He must snuggle with his mother at least once a week if he wants me to continue cooking for him******
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,744 posts, read 37,239,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nelly Nomad View Post
I don't know if it's unusual, but we have a shoes-free home. .

Are you Canadian? That used to be very common in Canada, but probably not so much anymore. I keep my shoes by the front door, and put them on for only two reasons. 1) going outdoors or 2) crushing cans.

In fact, in Montreal, people going to the doctor would leave their shoes out in the corridor or vestibule before entering the waiting room. In winter, people would never wear their outdoor boots or shoes into any building, even a department store or a post office. Since it's usually winter, they just got used to taking them off, and did so in summer, too.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-25-2009 at 08:13 AM..
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Here... for now
1,747 posts, read 1,814,791 times
Reputation: 1131
No, we're not Canadian. USA folks here. My mother and I pretty much went sockfeet in our home (not a "rule", it was more for comfort), so it just felt natural. Now, unless a home is visibly cruddy dirty, I generally take my shoes off in everyone's home.

I hope people don't mind!
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