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Old 06-01-2009, 03:28 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,513,337 times
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I worry sometimes that we make our kids' worlds too big, and unintentionally give them a sense of futility. To a greater extent, I try to keep their circle of concern in line with their circle of influence. (My apologies to Stephen Covey!) Does that make sense?
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Old 06-01-2009, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Australia
1,492 posts, read 2,658,738 times
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The media thrive on reporting the abnormal. So much so that we can start to think the abnormal is normal.

My experience is that young kids believe everthing they see on TV. If they see it they want it and if they want it, it must be good. It does not seem to be until they are around 10 to 12 that they start to realise that what they see on TV is probably not true. A fun way to demonstrate that with kids is to use a camcorder and interview them then edit the results so you mix up the questions and answers. It can be a bit embarassing in a fun way when you actually ask a boy if they like football and they say entusiastically yes and then you put it after a question like "do you like ballet".

So if the main input that anyone, especially a child gets, is TV then I would say that there is no way that they could have any real awareness of the world.

I hear that america has a very dodgy TV channel called Fox News owned by an Aussie ex pat and that this is really entertainment dressed up as news and people apparantly think it is true.
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Old 06-01-2009, 06:27 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,513,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aidxen View Post
I hear that america has a very dodgy TV channel called Fox News owned by an Aussie ex pat and that this is really entertainment dressed up as news and people apparantly think it is true.
Oh man, you do know how to throw a grenade into a conversation, don't you?
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Old 06-01-2009, 09:27 PM
 
3,566 posts, read 4,495,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
How much do your kids know and understand about the world? About nuclear weapons and terrorism and our president and the Supreme Court and social issues? Do they watch the news? With you? Do they talk about it? To you? Are you concerned about their sources of inforamtion?

When I was 6, in 1944, I was paging through a Life magazine replete with pictures of WWII, and I called out to my mother in the kitchen, "Mom, where is the "war"? "Europe" she replied. Did I know enough, for a 6-year old, about the war?
Could you have grasped any more of it?

When my son was in kindergarten there was an activity where the kids were to say what they wanted to be when they grew up. The strips of paper would then be tacked on to a board. They had already been made. My son said that he wanted to be a SC Judge. They did not have a strip and because he was adamant about it they made one for him. He was sitting on my lap while I had been studying cases when he was a bit younger. I would tell him about the cases. His teacher did not see that coming. Hell, I didn't see that coming.

War is something that we talk about. We first entered into these conversations out of necessity. One of things that I encountered on a consistent level is that there are people who say that he has the freedom to do anything that he wishes....especially with joining the military. I have been adamantly opposed to this. Three people, specifically, that would keep amping him up knowing that I was opposed. I have two brothers in the Marines, my father is a Vietnam Vet and on and on. On top of this, there is the patriotic shpeil going on at the school that does not address what is really going on. This annoys me. However, this is not something that we had been talking about yet. Outside of....Mom, who were the Nazis?

I think I was watching Why We Fight and there was a General named Ann something and she stated that she has forbidden her children to join the military. I thought to myself, did she just forbid this? Watch me. So, the next time that the subject came up I told him: You are forbidden to join the military. I then went back to two of the three people and asked them, in front of my son, and you each have three children and they are of age. Why did you not have them join? They don't jack with us anymore.

The real questions are, how do you explain death to a child? When dealing with social issues, current events, history, and war, this is the one thing that is often held back. When exactly is the appropriate time to fully explain drawn and quartered? So, he is involved when there are discussions of the causes of war and the repercussions of war and death.
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Old 06-02-2009, 04:44 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
339 posts, read 1,058,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aidxen View Post
My experience is that young kids believe everthing they see on TV. If they see it they want it and if they want it, it must be good. It does not seem to be until they are around 10 to 12 that they start to realise that what they see on TV is probably not true. A fun way to demonstrate that with kids is to use a camcorder and interview them then edit the results so you mix up the questions and answers. It can be a bit embarassing in a fun way when you actually ask a boy if they like football and they say entusiastically yes and then you put it after a question like "do you like ballet".
I think that is actually an excellent idea for slightly older kids. It's fun but teaches them to look at media with a critical eye. I think there are probably a lot of adults that could also learn a lot from such an exercise.

I also think discussing some of the aspects of advertising with kids could also be a very good exercise - asking them why they think something is presented in such and such a way and actively teaching them not to take anything that's presented as 'natural' - i.e. getting to the bottom of who benefits from an image being presented in a certain way. If they can carry those ideas forward in their life they will be a lot less susceptible to marketing efforts. Plus, you could actually apply the same analysis to a lot of news coverage.
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Old 06-02-2009, 07:15 AM
 
467 posts, read 845,706 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by aidxen View Post
The media thrive on reporting the abnormal. So much so that we can start to think the abnormal is normal.

My experience is that young kids believe everthing they see on TV. If they see it they want it and if they want it, it must be good. It does not seem to be until they are around 10 to 12 that they start to realise that what they see on TV is probably not true. A fun way to demonstrate that with kids is to use a camcorder and interview them then edit the results so you mix up the questions and answers. It can be a bit embarassing in a fun way when you actually ask a boy if they like football and they say entusiastically yes and then you put it after a question like "do you like ballet".

So if the main input that anyone, especially a child gets, is TV then I would say that there is no way that they could have any real awareness of the world.

I hear that america has a very dodgy TV channel called Fox News owned by an Aussie ex pat and that this is really entertainment dressed up as news and people apparantly think it is true.
Yes heavens forbid a boy likes ballet (or any type of dance).
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