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Old 07-14-2012, 07:26 PM
 
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Kids still living at home may need credit cards for many various reasons. Renting a car, reserving a hotel room, to be used in case of emergency, etc.

Having a credit card with a low APR and paying it off each month is also a good way to build a good credit rating. It's also something a parent can use to teach a child about budgeting and finances.

Credit cards are dangerous, yes, but also can be a useful tool.
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Old 07-14-2012, 07:33 PM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,728,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
II disagree that he'll only get minimum wage if he doesn't finish; there are many skilled trades that don't involve higher education, that make excellent money. My husband is a skilled tradesman who didn't finish his associate's, and he pays -all- our bills, we own our home, on a half-acre wooded lot (with the mortgage), we're never late on payments, we do home improvements, we live in one of the most expensive states in the country, and we sock away a few bucks for retirement every month. My part-time income covers the grocery bill and gas for our cars. We can even afford to go on vacation out of state once a year and stay in a luxury villa during the week we're away while he plays golf every morning on an Arnold Palmer course. So no, neglecting college doesn't stick you with minimum wage. What sticks you with minimum wage (assuming you don't -want- a minimum wage type of job - some of us enjoy a simple retail gig), is choosing to ignore life while it's occuring, and expecting it to just hand you everything you need.
Agreed. I know several people in my immediate circle who never went to college who earn over $100K annually (take home pay, after taxes) and have wonderful benefits (a couple of them have 4 weeks paid vacation a year plus annual bonuses averaging around $10K). Also, I know quite a few people who went to college, have 4 year degrees, and are burdened with school loan debt and working dead-end retail jobs. My sister went to college, accumulated $50K in school loans, and works as a tech support person, not even making $40K/year, with very few benefits.

You just never know. College seems like the wise choice, but it doesn't always work out to be the story with the happy ending.
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Old 07-18-2012, 03:52 PM
 
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You are wasting your money and time putting him in college now. He is not prepared and no motivation. Let him get a job and see how difficult life can be with no real job skills.
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Old 07-18-2012, 03:57 PM
 
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Nothing more motivating than working a minimum wage job...and getting to work on the bus. Been there, done that...
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Old 07-18-2012, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Lexington, Kentucky
6,282 posts, read 3,580,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
Nothing more motivating than working a minimum wage job...and getting to work on the bus. Been there, done that...
That worked wonders on my son! After a year of that, he was ready to settle down, study hard and get his degree!

The economy is so messed up right now, a lot of my friends have seen their adult children return home
for awhile - almost all are working jobs that are just not paying enough to support them in this economy,
or they need to stay at home and commute to college to save costs. (My own son is living at home and commuting to town to earn his engineering degree, at the University.)
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Old 07-18-2012, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,671,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SandyCo View Post
My son is going to be 19 in July. He has a D+ average after a year of college. He took the same math class twice with different professors, and withdrew from both because he was failing. He just failed his Spanish class and got a "C" in history. I'm ready to tear my hair out in complete frustration. He's not working part time (although he is looking for a job). He doesn't have a car, because I refuse to pay for the insurance, gas, etc. He spends his spare time on his computer (that he paid for with money that his grandfather had saved for him) and with his friends.

How do I light a fire under him?!

By contrast, his older sister is going to UC Berkeley. Her first semester there she ended up with one "C", and three "B"s. She's the shining star, no doubt, and she's extremely motivated.

I don't expect my son to be exactly like her. I do expect him to step up and take on some real responsibility. How much time should I give him? He can't support himself, not even with a roommate, on minimum wage.

I've asked him what he plans to do with his life. You know what he said? He wants to play poker!!! I tried to tell him that if playing poker and making a living at it were so easy, we'd all be doing it! He won't listen, of course. Help?!

You don't! For the most part....all you can do is ask the good Lord to help you survive, to give you the strength to not enable him, and to give HIM the wisdom to not turn to a life of crime for his survival. Clearly, he's going to have to go without, see his friends making something of themselves and buying their own things and want to make changes in his behavior. We all WANT our kids to fly, but unfortunately, many of them simply are too lazy to do so.
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Old 07-18-2012, 05:59 PM
 
18,856 posts, read 30,475,967 times
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I suggest you start discussing the military. Tell him he needs to move out and grow up. If he can't find a job....I wonder how hard he is really looking...there are jobs out there. But...that gives you an "in" to discuss job corps, city corps, military....get the paperwork and sit down with him to fill it out.

He has no reason to work...he is perfectly happy living at home, with his computer. Time to make some changes....unless you want him there for another ten years.
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Old 07-18-2012, 06:03 PM
 
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Tell him that the more money he makes, the hotter chicks he'll get.
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Old 09-11-2013, 10:22 PM
 
1 posts, read 704 times
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Default Be Careful - If he's trying

Quote:
Originally Posted by SandyCo View Post
My son is going to be 19 in July. He has a D+ average after a year of college. He took the same math class twice with different professors, and withdrew from both because he was failing. He just failed his Spanish class and got a "C" in history. I'm ready to tear my hair out in complete frustration. He's not working part time (although he is looking for a job). He doesn't have a car, because I refuse to pay for the insurance, gas, etc. He spends his spare time on his computer (that he paid for with money that his grandfather had saved for him) and with his friends.

How do I light a fire under him?!

By contrast, his older sister is going to UC Berkeley. Her first semester there she ended up with one "C", and three "B"s. She's the shining star, no doubt, and she's extremely motivated.

I don't expect my son to be exactly like her. I do expect him to step up and take on some real responsibility. How much time should I give him? He can't support himself, not even with a roommate, on minimum wage.

I've asked him what he plans to do with his life. You know what he said? He wants to play poker!!! I tried to tell him that if playing poker and making a living at it were so easy, we'd all be doing it! He won't listen, of course. Help?!

College can be a little overwhelming at first. I mean, trying to find where you fit into the bigger picture. My first year I got a letter after second semester from the Dean's Office. The letter stated to get with it or get out. Fortunately, I was catching up fast and completed second year at top of Dean's Honor List. If your son is really trying and wants college, he will get it. Give him some time to get in the College Groove. If on the other hand, he's not interested in college, put a fork in it and find something he is interested in. After all, college does not teach one how to be enthusiastic and doesn't care wit about what makes students passionate. That enthusiasm and passion is what comes from within and is never taught, and without either, individuals are truly setting themselves up for dismal failure. When your son goes to bed at night, and can't wait for the alarm clock to go off, then you'll know he has found his road to success, college or no college. GOOD LUCK!!
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,270 posts, read 86,094,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
Kids still living at home may need credit cards for many various reasons. Renting a car, reserving a hotel room, to be used in case of emergency, etc.

Having a credit card with a low APR and paying it off each month is also a good way to build a good credit rating. It's also something a parent can use to teach a child about budgeting and finances.

Credit cards are dangerous, yes, but also can be a useful tool.


It's all about being educated and disciplined enough to use the credit card responsibly.

We started teaching our boys how to handle credit when they got their first jobs at 16.

First lesson was, you pay that credit card off every month.

I am happy to say at 24 and 30 they still abide by this and neither has any debt (other than a small amount of student loans still being paid off by one).
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