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Old 09-10-2013, 09:10 AM
 
4,154 posts, read 9,089,945 times
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Back when people relied on paper state maps from AAA, they would show in red communities with at least one AAA-rated lodging or dining establishment, and with bold face and type size population. Lebanon would stand out on those maps with its black type, i.e. the largest town in PA that didn't rate any red coloring. Maybe one could think of an economic model that would preserve the seemingly selectively photographed nice old buildings. It might be more likely to happen there closer to the megalopolis compared to the Mon Valley. The "donut" of particularly ugly commercial sprawl around Lebanon City doesn't help create a positive impression either. Passenger rail would help immensely but especially with its location on a viable freight line that seems like a far distant proposition given PA's myopic politics. Kudos to the OP for seeing there really are things worth saving in arguably the armpit of southcentral PA.
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Old 09-10-2013, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Philly
9,798 posts, read 13,308,754 times
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https://www.facebook.com/UnionBeerHouse
Snitz Creek Brewery - Home
Quote:
The Snitz Creek Brewing Company is a locally owned brewpub located at 7 North 9th Street in Lebanon, PA. All of our beers are brewed onsite and we offer a variety of pub style foods to compliment our beers. We are proud to be the first to bring the craft of microbrewing to downtown Lebanon, PA.[SIZE=4] [/SIZE]
now I have a reason to visit this armpit. I take it you haven't been to chester?

Last edited by pman; 09-10-2013 at 10:51 AM..
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Old 09-10-2013, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
PP-did you happen to notice if there's still a train station? Lebanon is high on my list of places that should see restored train service
There is an old train station on North 8th Street. It was restored a while back (80's) and was a bank. Now I think it's vacant again. If you google "Lebanon, PA train station" you'll see it's a great building.
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Old 09-10-2013, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Philly
9,798 posts, read 13,308,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
There is an old train station on North 8th Street. It was restored a while back (80's) and was a bank. Now I think it's vacant again. If you google "Lebanon, PA train station" you'll see it's a great building.
Reading Railroad built 1900

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Lebanon_PA.JPG
cornwall and lebanon (later PRR) station

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...n_LebCo_PA.jpg
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
The buff-colored one with the tower is the one I was referring to. The red brick one is across the street and half a block south. I wasn't sure of the photo posting rules. Thanks for doing that.
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Philly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
The buff-colored one with the tower is the one I was referring to. The red brick one is across the street and half a block south. I wasn't sure of the photo posting rules. Thanks for doing that.
the second one is amazing though it appears its been a long time since it saw service (the railbed is a street!). the buff colored one is the one that could one day see service again since it's adjacent the main line to reading (and from there on to Philadelphia via Phoenixville).
seems like lebanon is actively improving itself, population grew by 4.2% between 2000 and 2010
Quote:
The Farmers Market operated continuously at this location until the mid 1960s when it closed due to expansion of the sewing factory. In 2003, Lebanon Landmarks, Inc. owned by Bill Kolovani purchased the Market House as part of a downtown revitalization plan. In 2010, Lebanon Farmers Market LLC purchased the historic building from M&T bank.

The Farmers Market has returned to its original home in the beautifully restored Market House that is once again the place to see and be seen!
Lebanon Farmers Market
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Old 09-10-2013, 01:18 PM
 
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Work is continuing on extending the rail trail in the southern part of Lebanon County Lebanon Valley Rails to Trails through the City and into the northern part of Lebanon County, eventually to Swatara State Park north of I-81 which would cross the Appalachian Trail as well. Lebanon Valley Rail Trail progresses - Lebanon Daily News
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Old 09-10-2013, 03:46 PM
 
Location: McKeesport
4,468 posts, read 6,992,534 times
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Those buildings were not necessarily "selectively photographed." If you noticed, I took a lot of photographs showing the entire streetscape. Lebanon is not a big city. Also, it is worth noting that most of the buildings were in an excellent state of preservation.
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Old 09-10-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,565 posts, read 2,385,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PreservationPioneer View Post
Those buildings were not necessarily "selectively photographed." If you noticed, I took a lot of photographs showing the entire streetscape. Lebanon is not a big city. Also, it is worth noting that most of the buildings were in an excellent state of preservation.
It's true. The city is, for the most part, well preserved. It's not nearly as far gone as actual hellholes like Chester or Braddock. Lebanon really just needs some $$$ and some TLC.
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Old 09-11-2013, 12:13 AM
 
Location: McKeesport
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I don't think I have ever been to an old city that was more intact. I think it's on par with places like York, Gettysburg, and Franklin, which as far as I can tell have been perfectly preserved. Sometimes, lack of investment is good for preservation. Look at what the booming economy is doing to downtown Pittsburgh - historic buildings demolished frequently for new buildings. Look what development dollars did to cities in the 1950s and 1960s - clear cut for urban renewal. Lebanon has been blessed - it's not a parking lot, and it's not blighted or abandoned.
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