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Old 01-04-2017, 01:21 PM
 
Location: The Flagship City
2,525 posts, read 3,171,309 times
Reputation: 1732

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Student loans don't seem to be calculated as income for tax purposes, so you're probably right that when considering the poverty line they wouldn't be considered.

That said, the poverty line is very low for a single person - only $11,000 annually. Many graduate assistants paid on an annual basis now make in the mid 20s - or even low 30s in some fields. So a lot wouldn't qualify as below the poverty line. Some undoubtedly would - I know law students are supposed to not work while earning their degree and get large cash grants.
Right and I know GA salaries are up, but my GA position did not pay for books and university fees, just tuition. So some of these graduate assistants might be spending their "salary" on books and university fees. Also, I just checked and my former GA position now pays $1,100 per month in 2017 so I guess this is above the poverty line, but not by much.
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Old 01-04-2017, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
31,199 posts, read 69,432,101 times
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I wish I knew where these "impoverished" CMU students got the money to drive around in newer BMW's and Mercedes-Benzes.
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Old 01-04-2017, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
6,300 posts, read 7,777,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
I wish I knew where these "impoverished" CMU students got the money to drive around in newer BMW's and Mercedes-Benzes.
Mommy and daddy.
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Old 01-04-2017, 01:53 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL -> ATL
4,756 posts, read 3,971,811 times
Reputation: 3874
Quote:
Originally Posted by trackstar13 View Post
Right and I know GA salaries are up, but my GA position did not pay for books and university fees, just tuition. So some of these graduate assistants might be spending their "salary" on books and university fees. Also, I just checked and my former GA position now pays $1,100 per month in 2017 so I guess this is above the poverty line, but not by much.
I get 150 a week for mine and that's after a raise for the 2nd year.
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Old 01-04-2017, 04:36 PM
 
12,840 posts, read 29,223,904 times
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Do college students really count in there? When our kids were in college, they were considered our dependents. I sort of remember not counting them on the census because they lived at home less then 9 months of the year, but they weren't really residents of where they went to college. If you only considered the money they earned while in college, two of them would have been below poverty level and that would skew the stats because they weren't paying their room and board, taxes, etc.

I found it interesting that Allentown had a 26.5% poverty rate, but Lehigh county, in which it resides has just a 12.1% poverty rate. Bethlehem, which adjoins Allentown had a 17.5% poverty rate but the county it resides in, Northampton, has an 8.8% rate. Adding to the college students in city discussion, there are several colleges within the city boundaries in Allentown and Bethlehem.
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Old 01-04-2017, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
31,199 posts, read 69,432,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
Do college students really count in there? When our kids were in college, they were considered our dependents. I sort of remember not counting them on the census because they lived at home less then 9 months of the year, but they weren't really residents of where they went to college. If you only considered the money they earned while in college, two of them would have been below poverty level and that would skew the stats because they weren't paying their room and board, taxes, etc.

I found it interesting that Allentown had a 26.5% poverty rate, but Lehigh county, in which it resides has just a 12.1% poverty rate. Bethlehem, which adjoins Allentown had a 17.5% poverty rate but the county it resides in, Northampton, has an 8.8% rate. Adding to the college students in city discussion, there are several colleges within the city boundaries in Allentown and Bethlehem.
Cities always tend to have higher levels of poverty than the suburbs for two reasons:

1.) Most social services agencies and non-profits that assist the poor tend to be clustered in cities, and those who are in need of such assistance often want to be as near to these resources as possible; and

2.) More often than not subsidized housing projects tend to be clustered in cities, either because they are more transit-friendly for lower-income people who can't afford a car OR because affluent suburbanites would balk at the notion of "the projects" being built across the street from their cul-de-sacs.

I can't think of many instances in PA where a city is wealthier, overall, than most of its suburbs. I can't think of a single one, as a matter of fact.

Altoona (poor) has Logan Township (rich).
Johnstown (dirt poor) has Richland Township (rich).
Pittsburgh (mixture of classes) has the North Hills and South Hills (rich).
Philadelphia (mixture of classes) has the "collar counties" (rich).
Harrisburg (poor) has the West Shore and surrounding townships (rich).
Erie (mixture of classes) has Millcreek Township and Summit Township (rich).
York (poor) has surrounding townships (rich).
Lancaster (poor) has surrounding townships (rich).
Wilkes-Barre (dirt poor) has the Back Mountain and Mountain Top (rich).
Scranton (poor) has The Abingtons (rich).
Allentown (poor) has Saucon Valley (rich).
Reading (dirt poor) has Wyomissing (rich).

This state is going to continue to bleed residents and be an eyesore overall until we stop neglecting, avoiding, and trash-talking the once-proud cities that helped to make the state so powerful 100 years ago.
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Old 01-04-2017, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,076 posts, read 4,341,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Cities always tend to have higher levels of poverty than the suburbs for two reasons:

1.) Most social services agencies and non-profits that assist the poor tend to be clustered in cities, and those who are in need of such assistance often want to be as near to these resources as possible; and

2.) More often than not subsidized housing projects tend to be clustered in cities, either because they are more transit-friendly for lower-income people who can't afford a car OR because affluent suburbanites would balk at the notion of "the projects" being built across the street from their cul-de-sacs.

I can't think of many instances in PA where a city is wealthier, overall, than most of its suburbs. I can't think of a single one, as a matter of fact.

Altoona (poor) has Logan Township (rich).
Johnstown (dirt poor) has Richland Township (rich).
Pittsburgh (mixture of classes) has the North Hills and South Hills (rich).
Philadelphia (mixture of classes) has the "collar counties" (rich).
Harrisburg (poor) has the West Shore and surrounding townships (rich).
Erie (mixture of classes) has Millcreek Township and Summit Township (rich).
York (poor) has surrounding townships (rich).
Lancaster (poor) has surrounding townships (rich).
Wilkes-Barre (dirt poor) has the Back Mountain and Mountain Top (rich).
Scranton (poor) has The Abingtons (rich).
Allentown (poor) has Saucon Valley (rich).
Reading (dirt poor) has Wyomissing (rich).

This state is going to continue to bleed residents and be an eyesore overall until we stop neglecting, avoiding, and trash-talking the once-proud cities that helped to make the state so powerful 100 years ago.
I'd add a third reason to your post: because the cities became deindustrialized as jobs fled to the south/other countries, those residents with the wherewithal to flee (to the suburbs) did, leaving behind those who couldn't leave (poor) or those who didn't want to (mixed classes).
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:15 AM
 
12,840 posts, read 29,223,904 times
Reputation: 7403
I didn't mean to imply that I was surprised that the cities had a higher percentage of poverty. I was surprised at the huge difference overall and because the city of Allentown and Northampton take up a large percentage area wise and population of each county.
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Last edited by toobusytoday; 01-05-2017 at 07:57 AM..
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Old 01-05-2017, 06:03 PM
 
5,805 posts, read 8,844,612 times
Reputation: 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by RightonWalnut View Post
Philadelphia would be in the same boat. Temple University, Drexel University, University of Pennsylvania, St. Joseph's, LaSalle, Thomas Jefferson, University of the Arts, etc. etc.

In fact, University City in Philadelphia and Oakland in Pittsburgh are almost the same exact animals.

Most cities in the US would probably be in the same boat.
Not its not Philly's media wouldn't be writing articles like this is if the majority of the poverty in Philadelphia was from Students. Philly's poverty problem comes from its large swath of Ghettos.

Another notion that lends itself to eschaton theory is that Pittsburgh (the city) does have the 2nd highest % Millennials concentrated in the city, after Boston.
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Old 01-06-2017, 07:01 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,615 posts, read 5,823,607 times
Reputation: 3614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Not its not Philly's media wouldn't be writing articles like this is if the majority of the poverty in Philadelphia was from Students. Philly's poverty problem comes from its large swath of Ghettos.

Another notion that lends itself to eschaton theory is that Pittsburgh (the city) does have the 2nd highest % Millennials concentrated in the city, after Boston.
Why do you post on Philly threads claiming that all we do is bash Pittsburgh and the rest of the state, when I have NEVER seen you post a positive thing about Philadelphia.


To me it comes off as a serious inferiority complex. Its like you know that Philadelphia is bigger, more powerful, and has more going for it, so you challenge and disregard every positive aspect of the city.


And no one claimed that the majority of Philadelphias poverty is from students, and NEITHER is Pittsburghs. And I and many others have stated before that a high poverty rate does mean a city is economically struggling. NYC is the most powerful city in the world, yet has a very high poverty rate. Find some new material, your irrational rants are becoming tiresome to read.



(FYI, I like both Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, but I do not deny that Philadelphia AND its metro is the most powerful city/area in the state.
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