U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 01-23-2018, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
2,540 posts, read 1,908,988 times
Reputation: 2657

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I am surprised other towns didn't make the list. In the last 8 years, I have watched PA decline. I used to think Alabama and Arkansas were poor...PA is at the same level. To top it off, the opioid crisis is getting worse. I don't see the conditions getting any better with our do-nothing-but-collect-a-paycheck government officials and the welfare-is-an-entitlement populace.

Well this is the current state of Pennsylvania:

The regions doing well; are doing quite well over all economically. These include:

1) Southeast PA (which is BOOMING; I am talking tens of Billions dollars worth of development) 5 Million
2) Pittsburgh (moderate growth, but a lot of investment especially in strong and well paid industries) 2.2 Million
3) Lehigh Valley (Allentown alone has had billions in investment in the past few years) 800k
4) Central PA (Lancaster - Harrisburg - York) The most modest growth, but it still has seen positive growth. 1 Million
5) State College, PA 150k


Total Population: Over 9 Million people. Which is 3/4 of the states population. The other 3 million are struggling. Which is a sizable amount of people. Pennsylvania is not the only place where this is occurring. All the way from Upstate NY to WI.

Outside of those areas, the state has struggled to remain competitive economically. Pennsylvania has one of the largest rural populations in the nation; and the rural parts of the state; are the areas that are struggling. On a statewide level though, the areas doing well, are exceeding the areas struggling. Significantly.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-23-2018, 11:07 AM
 
10,787 posts, read 7,827,187 times
Reputation: 3966
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazerj View Post
LOL. They have brand new condos in Old City that start at $2M. Philly is super poor.
But there are lots of poor people in Philly. It's close to 25%. Philadelphia is statistically the poorest city among the ten largest cities in the country.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 11:36 AM
 
232 posts, read 243,994 times
Reputation: 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
Well this is the current state of Pennsylvania:

The regions doing well; are doing quite well over all economically. These include:

1) Southeast PA (which is BOOMING; I am talking tens of Billions dollars worth of development) 5 Million
2) Pittsburgh (moderate growth, but a lot of investment especially in strong and well paid industries) 2.2 Million
3) Lehigh Valley (Allentown alone has had billions in investment in the past few years) 800k
4) Central PA (Lancaster - Harrisburg - York) The most modest growth, but it still has seen positive growth. 1 Million
5) State College, PA 150k


Total Population: Over 9 Million people. Which is 3/4 of the states population. The other 3 million are struggling. Which is a sizable amount of people. Pennsylvania is not the only place where this is occurring. All the way from Upstate NY to WI.

Outside of those areas, the state has struggled to remain competitive economically. Pennsylvania has one of the largest rural populations in the nation; and the rural parts of the state; are the areas that are struggling. On a statewide level though, the areas doing well, are exceeding the areas struggling. Significantly.
Poconos is not doing bad due to lv proxmity, nj ,nyc commuters and tourism.rest i agree there are spots in pa where devil saying good night.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
2,540 posts, read 1,908,988 times
Reputation: 2657
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
But there are lots of poor people in Philly. It's close to 25%. Philadelphia is statistically the poorest city among the ten largest cities in the country.

No doubt that the City of Philadelphia has some major poverty issues. I am not ignorant to that and we have to 100% address that and not be ignorant of that. BUT when we measure all of Southeast Pennsylvania, including the City of Philadelphia, it actually ranks around 12/13% poverty. Which is not on the high end at all. For example Metro NYC has a higher rate of poverty than Metro Philadelphia, despite the City of Philadelphia overall having a high rate.

The media never likes to report this; because well it just would not receive as many clicks. And so in terms of economic development, overall Southeast PA is exceeding many other MAJOR metros in terms of job growth and economic development. Which is my point in terms of the state's overall growth.

In terms of measuring poverty at the Metropolitan level (which clearly includes the urban core of each metro):

We pretty much are on par with:
*Charlotte
*San Diego
*Chicago
*Dallas
*Atlanta

And are exceeding:

*New York
*Tampa
*Orlando
*Houston
*Detroit
*Los Angeles
*Phoenix
*San Antonio
*Miami
*Riverside

https://www.census.gov/content/dam/C...ot-graph-3.pdf
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 04:43 PM
 
Location: A coal patch in Northern Appalachia
9,260 posts, read 9,243,686 times
Reputation: 11465
Quote:
Originally Posted by jate88 View Post
My hometown made the list of the poorest towns in Pennsylvania.

The 35 poorest towns in Pennsylvania | PennLive.com
Braddock ranked 35th and Indiana ranked 1st (poorest) tells me everything I need to know about this article. Anyone who has driven down Braddock Ave in Braddock and Philadelphia Street in Indiana know there is no comparison and the statistics don't make sense.

Coal Center with 135 people? German Township, South Mahoning Township, West Mahoning Township, Clarion Township, and probably the rest of the townships are not towns. In fact, based on the picture of Clarion Township, they should make it a state park.

Just another click bait article!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 05:00 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
41,527 posts, read 54,095,362 times
Reputation: 55902
Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
Braddock ranked 35th and Indiana ranked 1st (poorest) tells me everything I need to know about this article. Anyone who has driven down Braddock Ave in Braddock and Philadelphia Street in Indiana know there is no comparison and the statistics don't make sense.

Coal Center with 135 people? German Township, South Mahoning Township, West Mahoning Township, Clarion Township, and probably the rest of the townships are not towns. In fact, based on the picture of Clarion Township, they should make it a state park.

Just another click bait article!
Clarion and Lock Haven are both college towns. How many students are included in the numbers? Some of the population for Clarion has to include students.

Some of those areas are incredibly rural, Clarion Township, Bradford and West Mahoning Township are three such. I'm sure there are more.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Southwest Pa
1,440 posts, read 4,215,723 times
Reputation: 1694
Coal Center is technically a village but has two distinct areas. The "village" itself is what's left of the old town. A few streets of houses, post office, a bar and an 84 Lumber store and plant on the old slag heap site. 80 years ago, when the mine was active, a completely different town, as most around here were.

The actual zip code area runs quite large and takes in most of the surrounding farmlands, hollows and a couple of old "patch" towns.

Years ago there was talk of incorporating Coal Center into neighboring California Borough but C-C voted it down. There's really nothing to see there and little to do once you get there. It's just....there.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Southwest Pa
1,440 posts, read 4,215,723 times
Reputation: 1694
German Township in Fayette County, not a town of course. Several old coal patch towns are located within the boundaries but it's another place with no real reason to go there unless you have some personal history. Don't get me wrong, some fine people there, a few businesses, but nothing an outsider would find interesting.

Agreed though that it is what we around here would consider a "poor" area.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 06:19 PM
 
Location: A coal patch in Northern Appalachia
9,260 posts, read 9,243,686 times
Reputation: 11465
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Clarion and Lock Haven are both college towns. How many students are included in the numbers? Some of the population for Clarion has to include students.

Some of those areas are incredibly rural, Clarion Township, Bradford and West Mahoning Township are three such. I'm sure there are more.
Yes, I was wondering about the students being included in the population. If students are included, why didn't State College, California, Kutztown, Slippery Rock, Edinboro, Millersville, and West Chester make the list?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 06:32 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
41,527 posts, read 54,095,362 times
Reputation: 55902
Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
Yes, I was wondering about the students being included in the population. If students are included, why didn't State College, California, Kutztown, Slippery Rock, Edinboro, Millersville, and West Chester make the list?
Don't know. I can tell you, though, that Clarion Township, McKean County where Bradford is located and West Mahoning Township all have more cows than people. The last has a right fair number of Amish/Mennonites.

I would have thought Tionesta and Smethport would have been in the mix, as well as Summerville in Jefferson County.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top