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Old 02-23-2009, 03:23 PM
 
224 posts, read 440,953 times
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There are many different types of Amish. My uncle was black-bumper Amish. Their cars had to be all black. He bought a blue Buick and painted it with a can of black paint and a brush. My dad grew up Old Order Mennonite. The Elders of the church came one day and told my grandpa Enos that my dad's new buggy had rubber on the wheels and that was a no-no........to worldly. Good old grandpa told them "Take the rubber off your shoes and my son will take it off his wheels
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Old 02-23-2009, 05:21 PM
 
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I did not know Amish could have a car. I assumed they are Mennonite. I have seen those cars around before. I have heard that tractors have to have metal wheels so the families do not use them as vehicles.

There was a subdivision built near Harrisburg a few years ago in Hampden Township with Amish carpenters. I think it is called Hampden Court, off Skyport Drive. I can remember the crews building the houses, it looked like a barn raising.

Another equally unrelated point: I went to a weird little farmers market outside of Carlisle on Saturday and bought what was basically a soft pretzel with hamburger and cheese inside of it. It was very good. I was on US 11 and missed the turn in the square and kept going straight. There were several Amish merchants in there. I had no idea Cumberland County has any significant Amish population.
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Old 02-25-2009, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida but moving to White House, TN soon
33 posts, read 80,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BackToTheCityMouse View Post
The McDonald's in Juniata County has a hitching post so the Amish can tie up their buggies when they come in for a burger run.

Not all Amish are that worldly, but it was not unusual to see young Amish women in the K-Mart, Giant Foods (buying huge bags of bulk candies -- they were definitiely BBWs!), and even the Hallmark Shop. Saw Amish families many times at country estate auctions. In fact, an auction house near our home out there had an Amish runner -- a super nice guy.

After living near so many Amish, I began to see them as just people, with some different lifestyle choices, but very much like the rest of us. (Of course, I can't speak for the really conservative communities.) What I don't get are the locals, who view the Amish as some kind of sacred and magical beings with a direct line to The Almighty The Amish are fully human, with all the good -- and not so good - that implies.
I find them so facinating and would love to learn a lot more about their lifestyles. I will have to visit some of their towns sometime and see how I could get in contact with one to talk to them through writting the old fashioned way. Hehe! Thanks for all your information and please if you know of any way of getting in contact with one to become a pen pal please let me know. Thank you so much.
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Old 02-25-2009, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Harrisburg, PA
160 posts, read 403,574 times
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If you want to do some background reading before corresponding with an Amish penpal, I can recommend The Riddle of Amish Culture by Donald B. Kraybill. Kraybill's research was done in Lancaster County, published in 1989 by Johns Hopkins Uni Press.

I haven't read the entire book from cover to cover because, frankly, it kind of creeps me out. Not that I have anything against the Amish themselves, but I am disturbed by the influence they have had on central PA culture. Maybe not just the Amish and other 'plain people', but extreme religious conservatism in general. My late husband's family came to Pennsylvania from Austria during the 1700s (before the Revolutionary War). They were trying to establish a vineyard near Philly; I guess the cold climate during 'the Little Ice Age' had ruined their business in Europe (the same thing happened in PA) Flash forward to the 20th Century, and the family on the father's side were now teetotalers! If those 3 well-heeled, worldly, entrepreneureal brothers could see some of their uptight descendants today? I think they would be shocked
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Old 02-25-2009, 03:26 PM
 
224 posts, read 440,953 times
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One thing interesting is the Amish can not have pictures on the wall, not even of themselves. They believe that is pride. That is why they don't want their picture taken. Calenders are allow though for they have a purpose. When my grandpa died, we went to the funeral. I sat on a bench(with no backrest) and listened to a 3 hour sermon spoke in German. It was so hot, I thought I was going to die
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Old 02-25-2009, 05:27 PM
 
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I own a copy of the Riddle of Amish Culture. It is a very interesting read. I recall reading that there are something like 75 surnames in the Amish community and not surprisingly genetic problems. Dwarfism, hemophelia, mental illness and Cohen Syndrome are all far more common in the Amish community.
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Old 02-25-2009, 10:50 PM
 
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We lived among them in Chester Co. in a small town called Honey Brook. None of them drove. Some had drivers. I bought fencing from one young gentleman that carried 2 cell phones and only dealt in cash. He has a thriving business. There are several sects located there living on farms. I admired there hard work. I walked my dog near their farms and would see a young girl, maybe 14 or 15 yrs old handling a team of six big horses plowing a large field. Lancaster is mostly for tourists. They were very friendly people, not much on showers or baths or deodorants!!
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Old 02-26-2009, 06:05 AM
 
224 posts, read 440,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bnepler View Post
We lived among them in Chester Co. in a small town called Honey Brook. None of them drove. Some had drivers. I bought fencing from one young gentleman that carried 2 cell phones and only dealt in cash. He has a thriving business. There are several sects located there living on farms. I admired there hard work. I walked my dog near their farms and would see a young girl, maybe 14 or 15 yrs old handling a team of six big horses plowing a large field. Lancaster is mostly for tourists. They were very friendly people, not much on showers or baths or deodorants!!


I remember of some families having a containers of water by their stove so they have warm water to wash............but one real good fact is that their meals are awesome
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Old 02-26-2009, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida but moving to White House, TN soon
33 posts, read 80,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BackToTheCityMouse View Post
If you want to do some background reading before corresponding with an Amish penpal, I can recommend The Riddle of Amish Culture by Donald B. Kraybill. Kraybill's research was done in Lancaster County, published in 1989 by Johns Hopkins Uni Press.

I haven't read the entire book from cover to cover because, frankly, it kind of creeps me out. Not that I have anything against the Amish themselves, but I am disturbed by the influence they have had on central PA culture. Maybe not just the Amish and other 'plain people', but extreme religious conservatism in general. My late husband's family came to Pennsylvania from Austria during the 1700s (before the Revolutionary War). They were trying to establish a vineyard near Philly; I guess the cold climate during 'the Little Ice Age' had ruined their business in Europe (the same thing happened in PA) Flash forward to the 20th Century, and the family on the father's side were now teetotalers! If those 3 well-heeled, worldly, entrepreneureal brothers could see some of their uptight descendants today? I think they would be shocked
Wow! The book sounds interesting. Maybe you are right I should read up on the Amish first. I didn't realize they were that different. Thanks.

Kimberly
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Old 02-27-2009, 05:25 PM
 
Location: South Central PA
1,561 posts, read 2,910,922 times
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Hint: Use the internet.

You will learn significantly more about their lifestyle from an educational site, documentary, or book than you ever will from a forum.
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