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Old 08-17-2009, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Orlando, FL
270 posts, read 384,351 times
Reputation: 195

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I just got back from a week long driving vacation up in the northeast. I drove through much of central and southern PA. It's a very nice area. Lots of friendly small towns. I've come to like the locale a lot. While I drove through many small towns, I was surprised to see the large amount of elderly people still living in PA. I thought all the senior population left the northeast years ago. NYS is losing population due to high taxes, poor economic conditions, incompetent politicians and the cold winters. Why does PA still have a rather large elderly population? Do they get a big break on taxes? What's the draw for this group? Just curious.
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Old 08-18-2009, 03:18 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
3,134 posts, read 5,739,956 times
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Some people say we have more seniors than any other state. I'm not sure as I'd think Florida would have the most. At any rate I'm sure we've got to be in the top 5 or so.

All of our lottery proceeds are said to go to programs that benefit senior citizens and we're the only state to do that.

There has been a property tax/rent rebate for many years - up to $500 for seniors and the disabled. In 2009 the ceiling became $650 due to the additional income from casinos. I live in Allegheny County where there's a homesteading discount on property taxes. It's for everyone, not just seniors.

There's no income tax on social security or veteran's benefits and possibly some other things. You can receive SS and work another job. After you reach a certain plateau the excessive amount becomes taxable.
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Old 08-18-2009, 06:11 AM
 
Location: SouthEastern PeeAye
884 posts, read 1,402,451 times
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There's an out-and-back migration effect in many of the small towns. People get to be of working age, move away for jobs, and when they reach retirement, they move back to the small town where they were born and raised. Happens a lot in the small towns of the northeast part of the state.

Being familiar with a few small towns, you hear this story a lot: "After the war (referring to WW II), he moved to X because of a job, then when he retired he moved back...". That in-migration is still occurring to this day.

A big reason this happens is the cost of living can be very low in some of the small towns. Along with the factors mentioned above, it works well. If you are originally from the area, if you move back, you know the area, might have some family or property there, and because of the small town nature of life, you probably still know some people, or can quickly re-establish some connections.
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Old 08-18-2009, 07:45 AM
 
169 posts, read 253,981 times
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While still ALIVE, Penna is very good to seniors since pension and retirement earnings are exempt from state tax. Most localities also don't tax retirement income or interest and dividends.

Most don't know that as soon as you DIE, however, Penna becomes one of the worst because of its brutal inheritance tax, which is the worst in the nation for most families. There is no exemption, so even families of modest means end up paying it.
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Old 08-18-2009, 07:57 AM
 
11,159 posts, read 8,062,060 times
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Pa keeps more of its older residents than any other state. Its also 2nd in senior residents. And the lottery does pay for many senior programs. My mother has Pace for prescriptions and its a good deal according to her. They have very nice senior residential and assisted living places in many areas, plus there's alot to do and places to go, etc.
Pa's biggest problem is people who leave NYC and New Jersey for Pa's lower taxes and then want to turn Pa INTO NYC and NJ. Crime goes up, sprawl and congestion and taxes go up, etc.
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Old 08-19-2009, 06:34 AM
 
Location: NOT a native Pittsburgher
323 posts, read 513,565 times
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Actually a lot of seniors (and younger residents) are finding it more difficult to stay in the state. Yes, there is a property tax break, but when property taxes are over $3000 on a modest home, a few hundred dollars doesn't really help with a fixed income. Not to mention the cost of living and other taxes are on the rise. PA is a tax & spend state, so the only ones that really benefit are low income residents.
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Old 08-19-2009, 06:42 AM
 
Location: SouthEastern PeeAye
884 posts, read 1,402,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethany12 View Post
Actually a lot of seniors (and younger residents) are finding it more difficult to stay in the state. Yes, there is a property tax break, but when property taxes are over $3000 on a modest home, a few hundred dollars doesn't really help with a fixed income. Not to mention the cost of living and other taxes are on the rise. PA is a tax & spend state, so the only ones that really benefit are low income residents.
Not all areas of the state have $3000 per year property taxes. Some come in significantly under that amount, and as you might guess these are small town areas with very limited options for jobs and economic growth. That's the trade off.
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Old 08-19-2009, 07:17 PM
Status: "Preparing for winter" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Selinsgrove, PA
1,511 posts, read 4,513,728 times
Reputation: 523
Yes, our property tax is only about half that, and we have a 1500 SF home with an attached garage and full unfinishedbasement - not huge but not a "starter" home either. As PeeAye said, though, jobs are scarce and PA doesn't do much to try to retain current business or encourage new business to come here. Taxes are too high, and now anyone even thinking about manufacturing in the industrial parks around here will be thinking twice due to the plan to make I-80 a toll road.
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