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Old 02-18-2010, 06:33 AM
 
3,124 posts, read 5,252,815 times
Reputation: 1976
Default What do you call the middle of PA?

More than a few folks have remarked on a roughly T-shaped zone in the middle of Pennsylvania that is socially and politically more conservative, and much more rural, than the large major-league metro areas Pittsburgh and Philadelphia.

Let's define this area as covering area codes 717, 814, and the portion of 570 outside "the Poconos."

Having spent much of my life in this zone I recognize its diversity - Gettysburg, Youngsville, Mahanoy City, Artemas, Montrose, Quarryville, and Harrisburg are all quite different places from each other. Yet all have been bypassed by Whole Foods and IKEA, for good or ill.

I live in, love, and have deep family roots in this broadly defined region. I've noticed a couple of posts recently where some terms that have been used have been considered pejorative by other posters.

I would agree that it's better to be defined from within than from outside. Since there is some evident importance placed on a definition at this level, though, what should we call it?
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:01 AM
 
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I live an hour south of Harrisburg, down 81. This area is called southcentral PA. Already well known, at least around here I thought.
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Jefferson County
26 posts, read 51,608 times
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I'm not sure if I live in this T-shaped zone or not, but I am in the 814 area code. If I were in the "T" I guess I would be on the left edge of it or left top.

Regarding your comment about being passed up by Whole Foods and IKEA, It's a lot worse than that. The area I live in is very resistant to any kind of change whether it be beneficial for the community or not. It seems to me that the community I live in wants nothing more than antique shops and family style restaurants serving truck stop food - everyone else stay out.

But the quality of life living here outweighs the minor inconveniences of traveling to acquire quality goods.

As far as what do we call it? people in the area where I live call it Western PA.
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Old 02-18-2010, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Just East of the Southern Portion of the Western Part of PA
1,050 posts, read 1,940,612 times
Reputation: 1004
The State College Area is about as "middle of PA" as you can get.
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Old 02-18-2010, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Far from where I'd like to be
24,829 posts, read 30,109,705 times
Reputation: 35916
I call it "the middle of Pennsylvania," "central Pennsylvania," etc. Why is it so important to attach a label?
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Old 02-18-2010, 09:15 AM
 
3,124 posts, read 5,252,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firefightermom View Post
I live an hour south of Harrisburg, down 81. This area is called southcentral PA. Already well known, at least around here I thought.
I'm looking one level up on the geographic scale, for the answer to "PA is Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and [blank] in between".
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Old 02-18-2010, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,459 posts, read 10,863,512 times
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ki0eh wrote:
What do you call the middle of PA?

and

I'm looking one level up on the geographic scale, for the answer to "PA is Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and [blank] in between".
As the saying goes, PA has Philly in the east, Pittsburgh in the west, and Alabama in between.
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Old 02-18-2010, 04:45 PM
 
2,528 posts, read 2,339,058 times
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More like conservative in the central and the "progressive, liberal and elite" in the east and western part of the state... Glad I was born and raised in the central part. Couldn't handle all the fame and pressure of knowing what's best for the others!!
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Old 02-18-2010, 05:16 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
16,401 posts, read 15,167,019 times
Reputation: 15480
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Outsider View Post
I'm not sure if I live in this T-shaped zone or not, but I am in the 814 area code. If I were in the "T" I guess I would be on the left edge of it or left top.

Regarding your comment about being passed up by Whole Foods and IKEA, It's a lot worse than that. The area I live in is very resistant to any kind of change whether it be beneficial for the community or not. It seems to me that the community I live in wants nothing more than antique shops and family style restaurants serving truck stop food - everyone else stay out.

But the quality of life living here outweighs the minor inconveniences of traveling to acquire quality goods.

As far as what do we call it? people in the area where I live call it Western PA.
Yep, you're in it. And yep, that's what happened to the economy when the mines and factories started to close in the 80s.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
ki0eh wrote:
What do you call the middle of PA?

and

I'm looking one level up on the geographic scale, for the answer to "PA is Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and [blank] in between".
As the saying goes, PA has Philly in the east, Pittsburgh in the west, and Alabama in between.
James Carville made that quote famous. He's also worried that people will see his winkie with the new airport scanning machines.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bnepler View Post
More like conservative in the central and the "progressive, liberal and elite" in the east and western part of the state... Glad I was born and raised in the central part. Couldn't handle all the fame and pressure of knowing what's best for the others!!
Me too.
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Old 02-18-2010, 05:38 PM
 
Location: a swanky suburb in my fancy pants
3,391 posts, read 4,439,402 times
Reputation: 1477
I believe the term is Pennsyltucky. At least that's what they say here in Philly.

<LI class="g w0">[SIZE=3]Pennsyltucky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/SIZE]

[SIZE=3][/SIZE] "Pennsyltucky" is a slang word to refer to the rural part of the state of Pennsylvania outside the Pittsburgh and Philadelphia metropolitan areas, ...



Last edited by bryson662001; 02-18-2010 at 07:05 PM..
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