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Old 03-15-2012, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Chicago
1,948 posts, read 4,296,520 times
Reputation: 916

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
I feel no one has really touched on this so here I am.

All nurses don't work in hospitals. As hospitals close,more and more nurses will be needed in nursing homes and home health. I believe the nursing home is worse than the hospital for nurses. A high patient load of 50 to pass meds to and do wound treatments,and supervise Cna's.
Most new grads are going to end up working in nursing homes,because of the aging population of baby boomers.
Most school ads talking about a shortage of nurses don't mention that fact,because they just want to take your money.

There isn't a nursing shortage. There IS a nursing glut. Too many nurses,not enough positions. I have heard of nurses working as nurses aides because they were unable to find a nursing position.
.
Why are hospitals closing? Very true that there are a lot of jobs in nursing homes and home health, but the health care sector is doing nothing but expanding as a whole. Our country is aging.

I'm friends with around 15 nurses, many being new grads, and I cant think of anyone that was not able to find a job within a month or two. These same people are telling me that its not that easy, but then they get hired quickly. Maybe its not as easy to get a certain unit anymore?
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:10 AM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,488,520 times
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Depends on your area. My area (Boston area) went through a lot of downsizing in the 1990s and there were layoffs of RNs, a first. Due to HMOs and general desire to keep people out of hospitals (no five-day stays for ankle surgery!), people are in for much briefer amounts of time, and therefore are often sicker while there then before. For instance, people tell me that patients who might have been in intensive care are now on regular units with monitors and chest tubes and stuff.
Certainly new grads cannot walk into specialty units around here. It's been years since they could do that, although I must say anecdotally that it seems male RNs are more able to start in specialty units as new grads than women (the men do tend to be older and have other work experience).
My job in psychiatric has no shortage, multiple applications for everything. There are a lot of colleges, two-year and BSN, in the area, plus waiting lists for community colleges. Maybe my area is unusual with so many schools and so many younger RNs. I was under the impression that the average age of RNs across the country was up in the late 40s/50s, and retirements are expected. I sure hope to expect mine!
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:25 AM
 
5,507 posts, read 9,008,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
sure u can. when u r not nursing, u can buy small properties pay them off and get some more.
what u do after 430 pm is your business.
but u should never nurse bek u wana be rich u should nurse bek u wana make a difference and alleviate suffering.
anyway if you are worried about having enough money its not the size of the money bag its the holes in the bottom that need attention.
learning a trade should be #1 priority for anybody over 18 years old. forget university.
jr college or military vocational education certicate and license are great low cost avenues to get a trade, my favorite pick RN.
A RN with a four year degree is the one that is going to be getting the job.
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Old 03-15-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Midwest
2,975 posts, read 4,271,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by long101 View Post
Of course they are, just like cops.

An RN will never make a upper middle class income by themselves. Its a decent paying career without much education needed, will always increase in demand and you really dont make life or death decisions (everything is protocol). I personally think it is a great field to get into for the folks that like that type of work.
Not much education? Some RNs can have a master's or even a PHd. How can they still be blue collar?
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:29 PM
 
5,507 posts, read 9,008,596 times
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Originally Posted by nyanna View Post
Not much education? Some RNs can have a master's or even a PHd. How can they still be blue collar?
Not many do unless you are talking about nurse practitioner.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,948 posts, read 4,296,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyanna View Post
Not much education? Some RNs can have a master's or even a PHd. How can they still be blue collar?
All you need to become a nurse is 2 years or pre reqs and 2 years of nursing, grad school is not needed.

There are people working at Mcdonalds that have PHDs too, does that make flipping burgers a white collar job?
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Old 03-16-2012, 05:35 AM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,488,520 times
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An old argument. When I went to diploma school in 1980, teachers kept insisting "We ARE professionals." I didn't get why they kept on about that. They defined professional as having a licensing requirement, standards of practice, schooling requirements. I think of blue-collar as working by the hour, not by salary and 'sigh' being able to join a union (unless you work on a plantation such as mine). Management is salaried and cannot join a union.
I don't really care what anyone calls my job. I don't have to dress, get paid well and have good benefits and a pension, am responsible for my own well-being and that of my staff, and am responsible for the lives and health of patients. Call it what you will.
The four-year degree people have so little clinical experience, it hurts to work with them in an institution. They will get jobs first depending on where you are located. They usually will get the supervisor jobs and all first. I have 32 years experience and a master's in public health and could never get a supervisor job because I don't have a BSN.
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Old 03-16-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Chicago
1,948 posts, read 4,296,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Management is salaried and cannot join a union.
I don't really care what anyone calls my job..
For whatever reason people tend to think that a 'blue collar' job is somehow a lower class then a 'white collar' job. I know the definition is subjective, but I see anyone who's daily tasks are mostly manual as blue collar. There are plenty of blue collar workers that are making 6 figures.
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Old 03-16-2012, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Fayetteville, GA
7 posts, read 8,114 times
Reputation: 12
Nursing is not going to buy you a nice house and a Mercedes GL Class, but you will get by comfortably. The average nurse starts out at $22 a hour or so, with regular raises, and differential pay for evening or overnight shifts and of course I hear Private Duty pay more.
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:27 PM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,488,520 times
Reputation: 18836
I think blue-collar refers more to the conditions of working (hourly versus salaried) and other things, not just "manual."
An electrician works manually, might belong to a union, has to be licensed with certified training/skills, might make six figures. Is that "lower class," or blue collar or what?
I think "manual" just means that you take what is in your brain and you personally apply it, like an electrician or a repair person.
Remember that the collar colors originally come from actual shirts worn for work, a "work shirt" for the factory floor and a white shirt/tie for the factory office (but not the foreman). How about the phrase "to be called on the carpet" if you are ordered to see the boss about a problem? That's factory talk.
The few times I worked in software companies and interviewed at them, I was acutely aware of the feeling that I was in a "white-collar" environment.
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