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Old 03-19-2012, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Midwest
2,975 posts, read 4,274,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
What happens if you can't find work in your dream unit?

I don't think anyone is trying to discourage you,but just pointing out reality.
I have met plenty of people who fell for the "nursing shortage",wasted all their money,can't get a job,and now wished someone had warned them.

Is it an Adn or Bsn program?

You said a few years ago. Things have changed since then. If it was before 2008,the economy hadn't gone south yet.
But there are going to be cuts in many employers' budgets. The first thing that gets cut is usually staffing.

There are plenty of jobs where I'm from. And I have experience working in the healthcare field so I wont be surprised at what I am getting myself into
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Old 03-19-2012, 04:44 PM
 
12,850 posts, read 24,511,901 times
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Did the OP say a specific "unit" or just wanting to get into the field? Usually you do have to do med/surg before getting into any specialty. From what I've seen, there are rarely openings in Labor and Delivery because a lot of people seem to want to work there (not me!).
If OP really wants to be an RN and is part of the way there with pre-reqs, then s/he should march on. If the ideal job isn't around their corner, maybe it'll be a few years later, or in some other area or state. I mean, it's not exactly like trying to become the primary ballerina at the New York Ballet or something; there are jobs. It is tough, varying from area to area. Note that my job only hires new grads (of all ages) because they're cheap.
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Old 03-19-2012, 04:54 PM
 
8,195 posts, read 10,230,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Did the OP say a specific "unit" or just wanting to get into the field? Usually you do have to do med/surg before getting into any specialty. From what I've seen, there are rarely openings in Labor and Delivery because a lot of people seem to want to work there (not me!).
If OP really wants to be an RN and is part of the way there with pre-reqs, then s/he should march on. If the ideal job isn't around their corner, maybe it'll be a few years later, or in some other area or state. I mean, it's not exactly like trying to become the primary ballerina at the New York Ballet or something; there are jobs. It is tough, varying from area to area. Note that my job only hires new grads (of all ages) because they're cheap.
When they hire new grads,do they fire the workers who have been there a long time?
Working as a cna doesn't count toward nursing experience.
None of my jobs have even considered it.
As a matter of fact,when I was an lpn and became an Rn,they didn't even count my lpn experience a nursing experience. The reason I was told it doesn't count is because they are 2 different licenses with 2 different scopes of practice. So basically,I had to start as a new grad Rn with 0 experience. Being an Lpn didn't help me at all,even with finding a new grad position.
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Midwest
2,975 posts, read 4,274,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
When they hire new grads,do they fire the workers who have been there a long time?
Working as a cna doesn't count toward nursing experience.
None of my jobs have even considered it.
As a matter of fact,when I was an lpn and became an Rn,they didn't even count my lpn experience a nursing experience. The reason I was told it doesn't count is because they are 2 different licenses with 2 different scopes of practice. So basically,I had to start as a new grad Rn with 0 experience. Being an Lpn didn't help me at all,even with finding a new grad position.
How do you like being a RN? is it stressful?
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:10 PM
 
12,850 posts, read 24,511,901 times
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Right. A new RN is zero years of experience, and hired cheap.
My job does have openings periodically because it hires so many new grads with BSNs who are getting advanced degrees and move on relatively quickly. Also, with new grads, there tend to be a lot of younger women, many of whom are second incomes (in couples) or who go out on maternity leave and then come back part-time or per diem if at all.
Of course, when one of us pricey old war horses retires, the systems doesn't mind at all. No one gets fired or laid off, except a few egregiously lousy nurses who should never have been hired or kept past their 90-day probation, (Yes, G---, I mean you! and H__, we still think you had a ringer take your boards).
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:13 PM
 
12,850 posts, read 24,511,901 times
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Can't ask me if it's stressful. I've been doing it almost 32 years, RN, mostly psychiatric, some hospice, some Army Reserve. I did five months of med/surg nights at a a truly crummy hospital and it was a nightmare- horribly busy, no support, less knowledge, and on top of that, boring.
I think if a floor job (unit job) gives someone appropriate orientation/training and maybe a preceptor and allows them to learn at their own rate (the official "orientation" is usually pointless, I mean time spent actually doing the work under supervision and *as* a orientee, not filling a full work slot right away) you can learn and do fine.
If your sense of self-worth is dependent on being appreciated by people around you, it might be tough, or else that's my old memory. Being a "nice person" isn't the best way to become efficient without stress.
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,948 posts, read 4,299,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Right. A new RN is zero years of experience, and hired cheap.
I'm not sure what you consider cheap, but... I'm in Chicago and I know 2-3 new grads with no RN experience hired on making $60k +. Albeit I believe 2 of them are on nights, so you do get a stipend for that, but still.
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Old 03-20-2012, 04:24 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,443,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by long101 View Post
I'm not sure what you consider cheap, but... I'm in Chicago and I know 2-3 new grads with no RN experience hired on making $60k +. Albeit I believe 2 of them are on nights, so you do get a stipend for that, but still.
I agree-starting salary out of college for a BSN in our area is around $60K as well. That's about $10,000 above the national average for someone with a BA/BS.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:22 PM
 
8,195 posts, read 10,230,193 times
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Its not stressful at all. I'm in homecare,(aka the best kept secret in nursing).
We don't get benefits like all the others,but you get to make your own schedule,and can take vacation any time you want.

I also love ltc,(true ltc,not subacute).
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Old 03-22-2012, 03:16 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
16,498 posts, read 20,049,343 times
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Also bear in mind mandatory meetings/inservices. Where I work, the LPN's & RN's must all meet on Monday's, and you better be there, even if it's your day off! And that's not the end of it, every first Tuesday all-staff mandatory meetings as well! It's your day off? Tough!

I don't think anyone can predict what's going to happen when the Medicaid or Medicare madness finally comes to an end, the money runs out, or the funds are severely cut back. And any of us in the health care field car hear the clocks ticking!

I've witnessed it over the last 10 years, growing patient loads, 5 LPN's cut down to 3 at night, 7 CNA's cut down to 4. And God forbid someone should call in sick the last minute, and no overtime gobbler around to fill in!

It could be, to cut costs: replace some RN's with LPN's. Just like when I worked in the Accounting field in a big corporation to save $: 4 year accountants (RN's) being replaced by the equivalent of LPN's/ CNA's: Senior Accounting clerks.
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