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Old 04-21-2017, 09:30 AM
 
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Hi I'm asking this question, because pretty much all articles I read on income class stratification (Upper/Middle/Lower), revolves around households of two, or families of 3 or 4.

But if you live by yourself, what income ranges do you use to define whether or not you're Upper or Middle class?
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Old 04-21-2017, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Seattle
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I have lived by myself for a couple years. My idea of these classes would be something like this:

Lower class: $45,000 or lower

Middle class: $45,000 - $75,000
Upper Middle: $75,000 - $100,000

Upper Class: $100,000+

This is sort of my Pacific Northwest standard. For folks in California or New York, it's probably a bit different. And for folks in lower COL areas, it may also be somewhat different.
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Old 04-21-2017, 11:53 AM
 
Location: NY/LA
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Socio-economic classes are defined by a lot more than just income, but if you want to generalize, then I would think that Upper-middle class probably starts out at the top 15% income. Upper class would probably start out at the top 1%.

There are probably several sites out there where you can find the distribution based on your own location, marital status, etc.
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Old 04-21-2017, 12:08 PM
 
761 posts, read 336,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabogitlu View Post
I have lived by myself for a couple years. My idea of these classes would be something like this:

Lower class: $45,000 or lower

Middle class: $45,000 - $75,000
Upper Middle: $75,000 - $100,000

Upper Class: $100,000+

This is sort of my Pacific Northwest standard. For folks in California or New York, it's probably a bit different. And for folks in lower COL areas, it may also be somewhat different.

For non-millionaire status I would agree with the above numbers for a one person income
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Old 04-21-2017, 12:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tidaldream View Post
For non-millionaire status I would agree with the above numbers for a one person income
Man for one person that puts about 60% of the US in the lower class. The median individual income in the US is just under $30k/yr.
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Old 04-21-2017, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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Quote:
Man for one person that puts about 60% of the US in the lower class. The median individual income in the US is just under $30k/yr.
That might be a bit harsh of me, but in general I tend to think that's about right. Considering how expensive our healthcare is, how expensive our childcare and education are, how it's basically necessary to own your own transportation vehicle, I think a lot of folks fall into the lower middle and lower class spectrum. It's increasingly difficult for retired, older, and disabled folks to maintain a middle class status with the dip in pensions and social security likely being phased out. Gone are the day when we were a solidly middle class nation.
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Old 04-21-2017, 01:53 PM
 
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It may sound strange, but in America the upper class isn't defined by income but rather by wealth. Or in other words, the upper class doesn't worry about income, as they have more than enough wealth to tide them over for the next generation or two of their descendants; thus, like income, the size of one's family is immaterial to the question.

Consider Bill Gates. He's definitely upper class. It has nothing to do with how much he currently makes or how many children he and his wife have. In fact, assuming a starting wealth value of $50 billion, Gates and his descendants could lose/spend $100 million a year for the next four hundred years and, with about $10 billion left, still be considered upper class.

The corollary is that if you rely on an income to keep yourself and your family in the style to which you'd like to become accustomed to, then you're at best upper middle class.
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Old 04-21-2017, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Central IL
13,341 posts, read 7,115,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabogitlu View Post
I have lived by myself for a couple years. My idea of these classes would be something like this:

Lower class: $45,000 or lower

Middle class: $45,000 - $75,000
Upper Middle: $75,000 - $100,000

Upper Class: $100,000+

This is sort of my Pacific Northwest standard. For folks in California or New York, it's probably a bit different. And for folks in lower COL areas, it may also be somewhat different.
Waaaaayyyyy low for upper middle and upper class, even for a single person, much less a couple -especially if you're talking Seattle.
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Old 04-21-2017, 02:51 PM
 
18,236 posts, read 11,645,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityScape0322 View Post
Hi I'm asking this question, because pretty much all articles I read on income class stratification (Upper/Middle/Lower), revolves around households of two, or families of 3 or 4.

But if you live by yourself, what income ranges do you use to define whether or not you're Upper or Middle class?

Economic class is a construct; there are persons living well beyond their actual income and thus in a different economic "class", but are financing that lifestyle via debt.


However if you want to go purely by income: Here's how much you have to earn to be considered upper class
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Old 04-21-2017, 03:01 PM
 
Location: WA
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Upper income is $400,000 and up.
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