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Old 10-23-2018, 04:39 PM
 
21,671 posts, read 27,730,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post





In short, if you have any initiative and people skills, waiting tables is a pretty good way to make fast cash. They tried to up minimum wage for servers in Maine. Didn't work out so well.
That was an interesting article.

Nonetheless, not all states have tip credit statutes in place that allow restaurants to pay less than minimum, yet tipping still happens in those states and menu prices aren't necessarily astronomical. They don't seem any higher in Oregon than anywhere else, and servers get minimum + tips. I can see how suddenly switching gears in states where the tip credit has been in place for a long time would provide some members of the general public with the impression that tipping is no longer necessary, though.

 
Old 10-23-2018, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,960 posts, read 45,395,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by settled00 View Post
If we're going to pay food-servers as well as a college-educated professionals, do we really need to tip?
Here’s the thing. Why is the guy who collects your stinking garbage when it’s 90 degrees, worth less than the guy who sells you insurance, or the guy who sells you a car, or does your dry cleaning, etc? It seems to me that we have an uneven sense of the value of certain jobs.

The guy who owns a fleet of garbage trucks is worth more to society than another ambulance chasing lawyer.
 
Old 10-23-2018, 06:56 PM
 
11,678 posts, read 7,009,963 times
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Can we just all agree that everyone isn’t going to agree about tipping?

Reminds me a church service where you feel eyes on you when you go to stick something in the offering plate.
 
Old 10-24-2018, 02:58 AM
 
70,875 posts, read 71,228,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Here’s the thing. Why is the guy who collects your stinking garbage when it’s 90 degrees, worth less than the guy who sells you insurance, or the guy who sells you a car, or does your dry cleaning, etc? It seems to me that we have an uneven sense of the value of certain jobs.

The guy who owns a fleet of garbage trucks is worth more to society than another ambulance chasing lawyer.
jobs are priced by the markets . those jobs that we can not do for ourselves or don't want to do for ourselves pay more .

the more that can do something the less value it has .

in the land of the blind the one eyed man is king . if most of us had a disease and could not move our arms those who could pour coffee would make as much as doctors .

our grade school educated septic guy we had in the poconos built a multi million dollar business doing things others can't or won't .

i built my 40 year career around morphing where others weren't .

this is why some jobs are worth more than other jobs . tipping is a way of taking jobs we value little and appealing to the customer to boost the pay more than the market values them .
 
Old 10-24-2018, 03:29 AM
 
6,942 posts, read 3,030,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by settled00 View Post
oh how I want to comment on how they intimidate you with their iPad set to "recommend a starting place for tipping" because there are obviously a lot of service workers here on this thread. I'd rather be in Europe, as they're not quite as greedy or shall I say, crude? ...someday hopefully. Meanwhile I will tip what I deal appropriate which will always be lower than the semi-skilled self-entitled think they're worth.
People have safety nets in most of Europe. In the USA its dog eat dog, what ever strategy that can get you to empty your pockets they will use. There really is no common decency in the USA anymore, its all about the dollar .... so that's how people are doing to act.
 
Old 10-24-2018, 03:29 AM
 
530 posts, read 153,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Here’s the thing. Why is the guy who collects your stinking garbage when it’s 90 degrees, worth less than the guy who sells you insurance, or the guy who sells you a car, or does your dry cleaning, etc? It seems to me that we have an uneven sense of the value of certain jobs.

The guy who owns a fleet of garbage trucks is worth more to society than another ambulance chasing lawyer.
I most certainly do not put the garbage collectors as food servers. Garbage management is a government public health function. We need that. Most of us value the person who collects even in inclement conditions.
 
Old 10-24-2018, 03:33 AM
 
6,942 posts, read 3,030,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sas318 View Post
I'm staying at 15%. I don't give a rat's arse if restaurants are suggesting 18%. Why should they make more money off of me, especially when the consumer is doing more? For example, now restaurants have this little machine that you can stick your credit card in yourself to pay. If I'm doing more work, why should I tip more?
Because its the USA and money is king. If you dont want to pay then dont go, I dont.
 
Old 10-24-2018, 08:46 AM
 
6,432 posts, read 1,276,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Appetizers, soup, salad, entree, dessert along with beer/wine/cocktails all mean more work per table. Tables also turn over less in the evening.
Yes, of course, if one orders all that -- and if so, I consider that to be more fine dining than than casual.

So, let's say a couple comes in for a nice dinner, as you describe, and the bill comes to $200 before tip. At 15%, that would be a $30.00 tip; at 20%, a $40.00 tip. They spend two hours at the restaurant. (Btw, I don't personally know anyone who would order everything you describe.)

Now say three couples come in for breakfast, one after another, and they spend an average of 40 minutes each at breakfast, for a total of two hours. If each couple orders a basic breakfast with a beverage, and the average bill comes to $25.00 before tip, that would be a total of $75.00 for all three couples. At 15%, that would be only about a $4.00 tip per couple ($12.00 total for all three couples), and at 20%, it would be a $5.00 tip per couple, or $15..00 total for all three couples.

So in the above scenario, the dinner waiter's tips would be more than twice as much as the breakfast waiter's, and I really don't think serving one multi-course dinner for one couple is that much more work that serving three couples seated at different tables. However, I have never been a server, so that is just my guess.

In the instance where there are NO additional courses for dinner, the tip goes up to the same degree that the cost of the meal goes up -- for about the same amount of effort, I would think. (And for casual meals, my husband and spend just as much time at the table, no matter what time of day it is -- and sometimes we spend MORE time at breakfast than we do at lunch or dinner. Of course, YMMV!)


P.S. And why should ordering a $300 bottle of wine mean an additional $45.00 in tip (minimum) while ordering a $30 bottle of wine means "only" an additional $4.50 in tip (minimum)? Does the $300 bottle require any more work in serving? (Btw, both those questions are rhetorical. I once worked with a master sommelier who once worked for the Ritz-Carlton, and he told me that at the Ritz, the "presentation" and service is exactly the same, no matter what the cost of the wine is.)

Last edited by katharsis; 10-24-2018 at 09:03 AM..
 
Old 10-24-2018, 02:00 PM
 
21,671 posts, read 27,730,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, of course, if one orders all that -- and if so, I consider that to be more fine dining than than casual.

So, let's say a couple comes in for a nice dinner, as you describe, and the bill comes to $200 before tip. At 15%, that would be a $30.00 tip; at 20%, a $40.00 tip. They spend two hours at the restaurant. (Btw, I don't personally know anyone who would order everything you describe.)

Now say three couples come in for breakfast, one after another, and they spend an average of 40 minutes each at breakfast, for a total of two hours. If each couple orders a basic breakfast with a beverage, and the average bill comes to $25.00 before tip, that would be a total of $75.00 for all three couples. At 15%, that would be only about a $4.00 tip per couple ($12.00 total for all three couples), and at 20%, it would be a $5.00 tip per couple, or $15..00 total for all three couples.

So in the above scenario, the dinner waiter's tips would be more than twice as much as the breakfast waiter's, and I really don't think serving one multi-course dinner for one couple is that much more work that serving three couples seated at different tables. However, I have never been a server, so that is just my guess.

In the instance where there are NO additional courses for dinner, the tip goes up to the same degree that the cost of the meal goes up -- for about the same amount of effort, I would think. (And for casual meals, my husband and spend just as much time at the table, no matter what time of day it is -- and sometimes we spend MORE time at breakfast than we do at lunch or dinner. Of course, YMMV!)


P.S. And why should ordering a $300 bottle of wine mean an additional $45.00 in tip (minimum) while ordering a $30 bottle of wine means "only" an additional $4.50 in tip (minimum)? Does the $300 bottle require any more work in serving? (Btw, both those questions are rhetorical. I once worked with a master sommelier who once worked for the Ritz-Carlton, and he told me that at the Ritz, the "presentation" and service is exactly the same, no matter what the cost of the wine is.)
Well, I guess if you just order a grilled cheese sandwich with fries, you can get away with a breakfast-level tip. Or just leave whatever tip you want no matter what you order. It isn't mandatory.

Quote:
Btw, I don't personally know anyone who would order everything you describe.
Then their final bill would be less. No matter what the people you know do there are plenty of others who enjoy this meal structure when going out to dinner.

I haven't been a server since college, but I have owned a restaurant, and for the most part, breakfasts are far less bother, and even though a few like you and your husband spend more time at breakfast, it's not the norm. I also don't equate soups or salads before dinner with "fine dining." The family-style place down the street from me offers a dinner menu based on that structure. They do have items available such as sandwiches and burgers, but these don't seem to be more expensive than some of the breakfasts. I just tip $5 a meal at this place and don't fuss with percentages, but I've never had a meal there over $25. If I go somewhere else that's more expensive, I tip accordingly. It just isn't a big deal to me.

The IRS makes servers pay taxes based on a percentage of their sales, btw. Not interested in "debating" whether this is somehow right or wrong; just pointing out that's how it is.
 
Old 10-24-2018, 04:43 PM
 
70,875 posts, read 71,228,648 times
Reputation: 48456
my buddy had to kick in a percentage of his tips in to a pool for the bus boys and kitchen help.

well he got audited and the irs is charging him for the thousands of dollars that he did not count that he gave back in to the pool . he was supposed to 1099 everyone he gave a portion to and did not. he had to pay over 10k
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