U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Personal Finance
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-24-2018, 04:58 PM
 
21,671 posts, read 27,730,260 times
Reputation: 16037

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, of course, if one orders all that -- and if so, I consider that to be more fine dining than than casual.

So, let's say a couple comes in for a nice dinner, as you describe, and the bill comes to $200 before tip. At 15%, that would be a $30.00 tip; at 20%, a $40.00 tip. They spend two hours at the restaurant. (Btw, I don't personally know anyone who would order everything you describe.)

Now say three couples come in for breakfast, one after another, and they spend an average of 40 minutes each at breakfast, for a total of two hours. If each couple orders a basic breakfast with a beverage, and the average bill comes to $25.00 before tip, that would be a total of $75.00 for all three couples. At 15%, that would be only about a $4.00 tip per couple ($12.00 total for all three couples), and at 20%, it would be a $5.00 tip per couple, or $15..00 total for all three couples.
Also wanted to add that serving at the level described in your first example requires a much more developed skill set than plunking down breakfast plates. There's a reason why fine-dining jobs are much harder to get than those in the corner cafe.

 
Old 10-25-2018, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,840 posts, read 1,379,506 times
Reputation: 9941
Well here is one waitress glad that she went to work.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/yout...233658143.html

A waitress in North Carolina got a $10,000 tip, and all she did was deliver two waters.

Alaina Custer arrived at work at 4 p.m. this past Friday when her boss, Bret Oliverio, owner of the Sup Dogs restaurant in Greenville, N.C., assigned her a table that would change her life. “The two guys at the table started sipping their waters and looking at the menu, and then kind of just walked away,” Oliverio tells Yahoo Lifestyle.

He then sent Custer over to see what had happened. “So I went over there and I wasn’t paying attention, looking down at the ground, and I’m like, ‘They’re not even here,’” Custer tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “And then I looked at the table.” That’s when she hit the jackpot. “There was a note on the table that said, ‘Thanks for the waters,’ and a stac
 
Old 10-25-2018, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,188 posts, read 6,074,910 times
Reputation: 11402
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Hereís the thing. Why is the guy who collects your stinking garbage when itís 90 degrees, worth less than the guy who sells you insurance, or the guy who sells you a car, or does your dry cleaning, etc? It seems to me that we have an uneven sense of the value of certain jobs.

The guy who owns a fleet of garbage trucks is worth more to society than another ambulance chasing lawyer.
I think Garbage men actually do alright income wise. And the guy that owns a fleet of garbage trucks probably lives better and has a higher net worth than most ambulance-chasers.
 
Old 10-25-2018, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Texas
9,146 posts, read 3,540,336 times
Reputation: 18952
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Hereís the thing. Why is the guy who collects your stinking garbage when itís 90 degrees, worth less than the guy who sells you insurance, or the guy who sells you a car, or does your dry cleaning, etc? It seems to me that we have an uneven sense of the value of certain jobs.

The guy who owns a fleet of garbage trucks is worth more to society than another ambulance chasing lawyer.
I don't need any more insurance but I do need someone to collect my trash every day. Garbage men/women (also known as sanitation engineers) have one of the hardest jobs there is.
 
Old 10-26-2018, 08:43 AM
Status: "Excited to move to Vegas!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Beaverton, OR
5,411 posts, read 5,834,561 times
Reputation: 6022
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
We tip between 15% and 25%, unless the service is very poor and obviously not the fault of the kitchen being slow, in which case we will tip 10% anyway.

However, what annoys me is the fact that tipping is based on the price of the meal. I just don't understand why servers who work the breakfast shift with the average meal plus beverage costing about $11-$12 should get half the amount in tips as servers who work the dinner shift where the average meal is about twice that. (I am talking about moderately-priced restaurants that are not part of a chain.)

I would MUCH rather pay more for the food and not tip at all.
My GF tries to avoid anything but dinner shifts if possible. It’s not unusual at all for her to make $20 TOTAL in tips from an entire 4-hour lunch shift even though dinner is always $100-180. Usually she clears $150 from a 4-hour dinner shift not including hourly wage. But her total hourly wage is much less because they still have to schedule people for lunch shifts so you can’t really get out of it, meaning lunch is barely above minimum wage and a total waste of time for just as much work.

She hasn’t found an enormous amount of correlation between services provided and tips given. She’s had so many times customers were rude and she gave them attitude back, then magically they tipped 20-25% and baffled her when she was sure there would be a pathetic tip. And other times guys tried to ask for her number or left their numbers, or were otherwise incredibly friendly and left 10% or lower tips. The biggest correlation is, sadly, race. It’s a simple Google search to confirm this but black people flat out rarely tip at all and if they do the tip sucks. In a year working there any minority group leaves poor to at best mediocre tips 90% of the time while white people - especially those 35 and over - tip the best. Young people tip poorly no matter race most of the time. I don’t know why tipping seems to be a cultural or race thing, would love to understand why, but the results are what they are.

My GF works with this one hilarious black guy I’ve met a few times, he flat out refuses to wait on tables of black people. It’s hilarious because he just told her flat out “Oh hell no, they won’t give me anything!” My GF was like, but you’re black too..? “They don’t care! They’re the worst at tipping.” I thought at first maybe it was a race thing but my GF is half Asian and she says Asians aren’t much better at tipping, either. So it’s not a race-to-race thing but just a race in general thing. Washington Post ran an article about it in 2015, among others.
 
Old 10-26-2018, 12:09 PM
 
Location: A tropical island
4,542 posts, read 4,408,105 times
Reputation: 11167
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
Hereís a Tip, Donít Tip Your Waiters
https://www.nyunews.com/2018/02/19/2-20-ops-razuri/
I couldn't agree more, especially about the disparity in received tips by race. I have long said that it will probably take a Supreme Court case arguing that tipping results in lower wages for minorities, in order to finally get rid of our tipping system.
 
Old 10-26-2018, 12:20 PM
 
Location: A tropical island
4,542 posts, read 4,408,105 times
Reputation: 11167
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyRUMad View Post
Wow. I never realized how many cheap bastards posted on this board. Shameless...
It has nothing to do with being cheap. I'd rather pay twice as much for a meal in a "no tipping allowed" restaurant. And before you say I'm spouting BS, I go to "no tipping allowed" hair salons, even though their prices are much higher. I like to support businesses that pay the employees a fair wage without shifting that burden to the inconsistent whims of customers.
 
Old 10-26-2018, 12:27 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,528 posts, read 54,080,580 times
Reputation: 30755
There is no "tip police." When I go to a restaurant, casual or upscale, I go because I like the food there. I can go along with whatever their tip or surcharge policy is. What their people are paid is not my problem, I'm not about to research their policies before going in to eat. If they allow tips, I'll base it on the quality of the service,usually 15-20%, sometimes more, sometimes less. If they do a surcharge, I'll just pay it.
 
Old 10-26-2018, 03:14 PM
 
Location: The analog world
17,087 posts, read 9,802,637 times
Reputation: 22736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Are folks like me, who live on Social Security or other fixed income, justified in reducing the level of tipping?

The prices of restaurant meals have gone through the roof, partly to cover higher minimum wage (currently $11.50 in my state, rising to $13.50 in 2020; higher in some cities etc)., but way beyond that, to really outrageous levels ó at least where I live.

I used to automatically tip 20%, but now with restaurant prices where they are, I just canít afford it. Iím lowering my standard tip to 10%.

How about you?
Sorry, but you'll get no sympathy from me for projecting your financial shortfalls onto hard-working servers. If you can't afford to leave an appropriate tip, you can't afford to eat out. Simple as that. Next time, make your own lunch or dinner at home.
 
Old 10-26-2018, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,840 posts, read 1,379,506 times
Reputation: 9941
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayanne View Post
It has nothing to do with being cheap. I'd rather pay twice as much for a meal in a "no tipping allowed" restaurant. And before you say I'm spouting BS, I go to "no tipping allowed" hair salons, even though their prices are much higher. I like to support businesses that pay the employees a fair wage without shifting that burden to the inconsistent whims of customers.
and that's great but if you eat out, it is cheap if you are trying to make some type of social commentary off the backs of workers.

If I'm a waiter I really don't give a hoot about your "policies" or who you like to support. If it's customary to be tipped and your in my establishment and I do a good job, an excuse of what you'd like to see society as isn't really going to cut it for me.


I really can't understand why it's a hard concept. right now in the US the societal norm is wait staff gets tipped. If that's a policy folks don't agree with and you don't want to support it, easy. stay out of the restaurants.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Personal Finance
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top