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Old 10-13-2018, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,521 posts, read 20,913,887 times
Reputation: 13858

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Are folks like me, who live on Social Security or other fixed income, justified in reducing the level of tipping?

The prices of restaurant meals have gone through the roof, partly to cover higher minimum wage (currently $11.50 in my state, rising to $13.50 in 2020; higher in some cities etc)., but way beyond that, to really outrageous levels — at least where I live.

I used to automatically tip 20%, but now with restaurant prices where they are, I just can’t afford it. I’m lowering my standard tip to 10%.

How about you?

 
Old 10-13-2018, 07:46 PM
 
Location: my little town
1,189 posts, read 409,062 times
Reputation: 1265
I'd rather see a flat price without tipping, but mostly I stay out of restaurants. If you don't have a kitchen, that would be a complication, but most fast food places have some sort of salad or something healthy enough.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 07:47 PM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,270 posts, read 882,375 times
Reputation: 12457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Are folks like me, who live on Social Security or other fixed income, justified in reducing the level of tipping?

The prices of restaurant meals have gone through the roof, partly to cover higher minimum wage (currently $11.50 in my state, rising to $13.50 in 2020; higher in some cities etc)., but way beyond that, to really outrageous levels ó at least where I live.

I used to automatically tip 20%, but now with restaurant prices where they are, I just canít afford it. Iím lowering my standard tip to 10%.

How about you?
You can afford it.

If your budget is X, you order food where price + gratuity = X. It's not complicated.

If you don't want to tip, don't tip. It's not required. But if you want validation and reassurance that it's fine to order dishes that are so expensive that you cannot afford to properly tip, well, you're not going to get it from me.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
22,556 posts, read 10,432,078 times
Reputation: 20345
First, I think that tipping should be a reflection of the service. I tip anywhere from 0% to 25%.

However, I think good service deserves a good tip.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,521 posts, read 20,913,887 times
Reputation: 13858
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
First, I think that tipping should be a reflection of the service. I tip anywhere from 0% to 25%.

However, I think good service deserves a good tip.
I have always tipped 20%, in cash when possible, unless the service is especially poor. Iíve always felt that the low wages and physical and emotional demands of waiting on tables justified the tips I left.

But now, as I mentioned, the skyrocketing restaurant prices and higher wages for workers have made it difficult for me to justify tipping at the standard 20% level.

Iím interested to learn if others feel the same,
 
Old 10-13-2018, 10:49 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,238 posts, read 18,760,472 times
Reputation: 10164
Take your tip down to 15%, which was once considered a fair tip, maybe still is.

On the other hand if 10% is the best you can do, well Hell, you can’t rap people for doing the best they can do.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 11:07 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,586 posts, read 3,676,728 times
Reputation: 19717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Are folks like me, who live on Social Security or other fixed income, justified in reducing the level of tipping?
If you are on a fixed income, why are you eating out? Eating out costs more than staying home and preparing your own food. A meal at a restaurant can easily cost 5 to 10 times more than a meal you would make at home.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,071 posts, read 1,472,792 times
Reputation: 2355
I don't think you should tip less than what's culturally normal just because you have a certain income level. If you can't afford to tip what is customary, don't stiff the staff because of it. Just don't go out to eat or order take out instead. A lot of them rely on tips to make a living. You may not agree with tipping and think employees should be paid a higher wage so you don't have to tip, but that's not the current culture. Just like you wouldn't tip in Japan, you should tip in countries that have a tipping culture. I know the "normal" level of tipping varies from person to person but IMO 15-20% would be normal for average service. You can adjust your tip for service below or above average.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 11:32 PM
 
580 posts, read 171,801 times
Reputation: 1691
If we're going to pay food-servers as well as a college-educated professionals, do we really need to tip?
 
Old 10-14-2018, 01:41 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,036 posts, read 3,222,584 times
Reputation: 8222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Are folks like me, who live on Social Security or other fixed income, justified in reducing the level of tipping?

The prices of restaurant meals have gone through the roof, partly to cover higher minimum wage (currently $11.50 in my state, rising to $13.50 in 2020; higher in some cities etc)., but way beyond that, to really outrageous levels — at least where I live.

I used to automatically tip 20%, but now with restaurant prices where they are, I just can’t afford it. I’m lowering my standard tip to 10%.

How about you?
I'd stop eating out then. If you can't afford it, why should THEY suffer your cheapness? If they see you coming, I'd have the greeter send you to another workers area. I wouldn't care to have someone who is cheap and demanding good service and not reflecting it in my gratuity.

I work, make just $3.50 an hour over what they make, but am so entertained by their friendly actions, true good customer service and a real desire to have me happy I tip $7 on a 33. meal. That's 21% I truly suspect that the server who I deal with makes 3X what he's paid hourly in tips does that tell you something?

Last edited by toosie; 10-14-2018 at 05:35 AM.. Reason: Deleted orphaned response
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