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View Poll Results: Well?
100-k 4 3.85%
200-k 1 0.96%
500-k 6 5.77%
A million 13 12.50%
2 million 36 34.62%
5 million 27 25.96%
10-million 11 10.58%
Hjgher 0 0%
I'd never stop increasing wealth 6 5.77%
Voters: 104. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-08-2018, 01:33 PM
 
Location: SoCal
12,993 posts, read 6,212,273 times
Reputation: 9564

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
LOL. Yeah, like anybody can make tons of money doing what they're passionate about.

Forget the 99% of people who crash and burn.
I agree and I think it’s disgenious. Face it, one of my kids and Jonathan have wealthy parents. There’s always a safety net. Don’t tell that to the average Joe, they really have no place to go if things don’t work out. My kids are all self sufficient, but I don’t want to pretend otherwise.
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Old 12-08-2018, 04:36 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,958 posts, read 20,218,130 times
Reputation: 22591
3% * $3M = $90K/year
So, $3M
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Old 12-08-2018, 07:38 PM
 
13,755 posts, read 7,296,947 times
Reputation: 25165
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I agree and I think itís disgenious. Face it, one of my kids and Jonathan have wealthy parents. Thereís always a safety net. Donít tell that to the average Joe, they really have no place to go if things donít work out. My kids are all self sufficient, but I donít want to pretend otherwise.
Thereís a middle ground where you can stay in your field where you donít have any passion for it but youíve found a job that isnít awful.
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Old 12-08-2018, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Portugal
5,857 posts, read 2,853,053 times
Reputation: 11176
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
I guess I misunderstand the concept of "poll". I thought it was to elicit the opinion of the respondent in his own circumstances. Which means "your age" is specified, and "the job you expect from your rope". Which may be different for other people. Hence, a poll.
Yet all your responses have been directed as someone else's answers instead of answering the poll, do you think spending so much effort attempting to castigate someone else for not conforming to your idea of how the thread should go is an appropriate answer to the poll?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
There’s a middle ground where you can stay in your field where you don’t have any passion for it but you’ve found a job that isn’t awful.
Or the opposing angle of being in the field you're passionate for not earning much money. They both have their advantages.
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Old 12-08-2018, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Portugal
5,857 posts, read 2,853,053 times
Reputation: 11176
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonathanLB View Post
I would argue if you seriously just pursued a career for the money, that's pretty sad, because you gave up on a chance to do what you really love for a living and if you're doing that, you'd never retire.
I don't follow. If I pursue a career for money, retire early, then can pursue whatever interests I want regardless of whether it involves a paycheck... that means I gave up on a chance to do what I really love for a willing and I never retired?

What if someone loved traveling the world free of any schedules or other obligations and worked hard in a career just for the money, retired early, then spent years traipsing about the globe doing whatever the hell he wanted? That doesn't sound like someone who never retired or missed an opportunity to enjoy their passion, it sounds like someone who did it right and is enjoying the fruits of their labor.
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Old 12-08-2018, 08:00 PM
 
Location: SoCal
12,993 posts, read 6,212,273 times
Reputation: 9564
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Thereís a middle ground where you can stay in your field where you donít have any passion for it but youíve found a job that isnít awful.
Yeah, I think that is the truth for most people. None of my relatives love love their jobs, but they love the money, love the benefits, love being a provider for their children. They donít hate their jobs.
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Old 12-08-2018, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Portugal
5,857 posts, read 2,853,053 times
Reputation: 11176
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
LOL. Yeah, like anybody can make tons of money doing what they're passionate about.
Obligatory:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LCggmsCXk4
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Old 12-08-2018, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Central IL
15,079 posts, read 8,416,246 times
Reputation: 35319
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Why don't you just answer the poll? Would you retire with a half a million? Or keep going to the office every day to increase your ten million? Why is that question so hard for you to uderstand, or fathom somebody having a different viewpoint from yours?
Why so argumentative? People don't want to be as simplistic as you seem to be?

How "early" is early? I'd need more to retire at 40 than 50 than 60?
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Old 12-08-2018, 09:15 PM
 
13,755 posts, read 7,296,947 times
Reputation: 25165
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Or the opposing angle of being in the field you're passionate for not earning much money. They both have their advantages.
Yeah, but if you do something for 30+ years, you may have started by being passionate about it but it eventually reverts to being a job to earn a living. Since you have all those acquired skills and expertise, itís tough to do the midlife career change for a whopping pay cut. Most people do career changes because they have no other option.
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Old 12-09-2018, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
5,316 posts, read 4,036,370 times
Reputation: 7074
How many people have a job they truly love, and get paid a living wage for it? Much less one that is stable for the long term? Or will earn enough to be able to provide for a retirement?

I became a photographer which most people would say they love. But to make a living I had to run it like a business which resulted in actually spending 10% of the time behind the camera and the rest marketing and running a business. I also had to photograph subjects I wasn’t enamored with.
So I didn’t love the job, but I liked it more than being a roofer or something else.
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