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Old 06-19-2009, 11:18 PM
 
41,643 posts, read 44,893,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sueprnova View Post
After all these years we have no joint cc's only a joint bank account/mtg and cars. We don't have those additional cards...so it doesn't matter if we're married or not...we have nothing to do with each others cc's.
Or so she says.If she tires of you she can take out a credit card and have the billing address for correspondence sent to a post office box. Then runup the cards taking cash advances and stashing it for six monhts until your servng you.. Then file for bankrupsy. When asked by thye court what she did with the advances ;just say spent it. your stuck with the bills.
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Old 06-22-2009, 09:04 AM
 
2,151 posts, read 3,108,796 times
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Ooh, a chance for me to trot out my favorite song ... Prenup! Prenup! Prenup! I (heart) my prenup.

In my state, the law conjoins you financially at the hip, whether you want it or not. The only way around this was to set up a prenup, which addressed both aspects of our financial life: the day to day financial arrangement AND the what-if-the-marriage-goes-bad aspect. We now retain the right to completely separate property throughout the marriage. Neither of us ever wants to be responsible for the other party's finances. It's nothing but trouble!!

Back to the original post: Bill needs to run. He's getting pressure to get hitched from a woman who cannot control her spending. Although it does sound like he has some commitment issues (what the he**is up with "She might change"??? I call BS on that one.), Nancy is a disaster just waiting to happen. If Bill is really considering this, he should get an ironclad prenup. Which, in itself, just might solve the problem for him. My guess is that Nancy will be so offended, she'll walk anyway. Problem solved. :-)
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Old 06-22-2009, 10:42 AM
 
458 posts, read 944,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heiwos View Post

Also, gov't figures if you're sharing expenses, you have more money to pay taxes, so tax rates go up (hence rates just for married folk). When I was married our "marriage penalty" was to the tune of a nice vacation every year.
What's this? I'm pretty sure tax rates generally go DOWN when you get married.
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Old 06-22-2009, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
2,395 posts, read 3,988,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malamute View Post
Also as he had originally co-signed for the accounts, he was told flat out that divorce did not remove his obligation to the third party -- the creditors. She was the primary card holder however and only the primary could remove him -- because the credit was only given to her in the first place on the basis of his name being on the accounts.

So you do have to be careful when married or sharing a credit card account with an out-of-control spender.
He should've sent them a registered letter stating that he wanted to be removed from the card and if they didn't he would no longer be responsible for the charges. Anything up to that point he was responsible for because he was a co-signer not just an authorized user. If that didn't work then hire a lawyer to do it for him.
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Old 06-22-2009, 09:04 PM
 
Location: NE Florida
17,800 posts, read 21,164,248 times
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Lots of interesting replies to this thread

The only way a credit card can make you pay if if you are joint on the account which means the bill comes in both names. If one spouse adds the other as an authorized user they get all the benefits of the card but no responsibility. Yes a divorce lawyer can make the other spouse pay for some of the debt but the credit card companies do not follow the courts ruling.

If it is a joint account and the Judge decides one party will be responsible to pay the credit card company will continue to collect form both.

The one spouse however can go back to the judge or file a small claims case if the divorce decree

So if the spouse was an authorized user they can not collect from them, as a matter of fact in some states the Credit Card company can not even discuss it with the spouse.

A majority of credit card fraud is committed by family members, the problem is most family member refuse to press charges against the family member.
When I was working at the credit card company I would get calls form folks saying my spouse opened the card in my name, when I offered to transfer then to our fraud dept they saidno they didn't want to cause family trouble.

Another thing most folks don't realize if you give your spouse or child permission to use the card once and they take the card and use it again with out your ok that previous ok can be used to hold you responsible for the charges.
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Old 09-21-2009, 12:06 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,821 times
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i have a question, if a college couple were to get married at the end of the year, would they have to claim it on their fafsa the following year? or would they still have to use their parents taxes to see if they qualify for pal grants?
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Old 09-21-2009, 02:29 PM
 
10,050 posts, read 13,831,055 times
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I believe it's that you have to not be declared on parental taxes in the most recent tax filing in order to be "emancipated" in terms of applying for student aid.
Regarding the "shocking" statement that marriage is a business contract and you needn't be in love, I think all that poster meant was that, yes, marriage is a contract with the state. There are obligations and responsibilities that are legally connected with the marriage contract, and emotions aren't among them. People are free to love each other, and free to sign marriage contracts with the state with the one they love (if straight only, in most states) but the changes in relationship on paper are contractual, not emotional.
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Old 09-22-2009, 10:16 AM
 
41,643 posts, read 44,893,785 times
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Basically 'it reqally changes from satte to sate. Where I live once your devorced the ex become respeonsible for all debt he/she builds up. The attornet will notify the creditor and often they wioll cancel the card. It can be done in the newspaper by public ntice and I see the all teh time that sate I so and so will not be responsible for so and so's debt.Yes i states that still recognise common law marriages once the court decides your common law then your held to same standards as any marriage.
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Old 09-23-2009, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Oakland CA
7,375 posts, read 10,087,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sms0511 View Post
I think I have posted about this couple before, but there is a new issue:

Well, our friends Bill and Nancy have been together for 9 years, not married, 10th year anniversary coming up real soon -- they've been living together for almost 7 years now. Nancy, like the "steretypical" woman out there, has been aggressively pushing marriage to Bill, but Bill is not budging.

Bill confided to my future husband that, on top of being afraid of Nancy "changing" (ok, Bill thinks that "if it ain't broke, why fix it?"... so he's thinking if his relationship is perfect now, why change the status w/ a wedding?), Bill is also afraid that his credit would get ruined, because Nancy has raked about $40K of credit card bills, which is waaay beyond her own "purchasing power", and she's almost going bankcrupt.

Well, I've heard different things about this, because I also heard that the only way a married couple would get their credit "jointed" is if they purchase something TOGETHER (ie, house).

Which is true? And is anyone experiencing what Bill is experiencing -- not wanting to marry in fear of his credit being ruined by the other person?
We don't have enough information.

For instance -- what if Bill earned 250K a year and Nancy earned 50K year? And Bill was a speedy go getter living a jet set lifestyle and all Nancy's credit card debt was to keep up, because when they went to the latest expensive restaurant Bill insisted on going to when the Bill came Mr. Bill Moneybags insisted on splitting the check? You know, since they aren't married.

And by the way -- she can't dress in just any old thing, because he has an image to maintain and the woman on his arm can't wear stuff from Target. But they are her clothes and he isn't responsible...

Here's what I DO know. My brother in law had a wonderful warm loving woman in his life that totally accepted all his "idiosynchracies", of which there are MANY -- but she incurred a lot of debt going to vet school. He told her repeatedly he didn't want to "marry that debt" and after she was earning good money and started chipping away at it....

She left him, for someone for truly loved her. He's been alone and lonely ever since.

I'll take a good marriage any day over perfect ratings... spending troubles can and should be worked out. And are every day.
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Old 09-23-2009, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
2,395 posts, read 3,988,996 times
Reputation: 1660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
Here's what I DO know. My brother in law had a wonderful warm loving woman in his life that totally accepted all his "idiosynchracies", of which there are MANY -- but she incurred a lot of debt going to vet school. He told her repeatedly he didn't want to "marry that debt" and after she was earning good money and started chipping away at it....

She left him, for someone for truly loved her. He's been alone and lonely ever since.

I'll take a good marriage any day over perfect ratings... spending troubles can and should be worked out. And are every day.
That kind of debt is different than the person that lives well above his/her means. The key is the current behavior towards money. Also best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. I grew up with my parents worrying about money and it is a very scary way to grow up. I would never want my children to feel scared because mommy and daddy do not have enough money to pay the bills. I was very lucky to marry a man who was taught how to save as a child.
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