U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-27-2010, 11:33 PM
 
1,688 posts, read 6,907,055 times
Reputation: 1988

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiffela74 View Post
. If this isnt a sick joke, do NOT run over an animal that youve hit. Either get help, or be there and gently comfort as you can if the end is near.
Tiffela, I'm sorry for your loss but please note that you are talking about two very, very different things in the same breath.

It's one thing to hit a dog or a cat - ie, a pet. If someone called you, the animal was tagged, correct? I did not, at any point in time, advocate anything other than calling the owner/law enforcement and emergency veterinary attention if possible (ie, if the animal can be moved). It's domesticated animal that had owners, as witnessed by the tag. That's a given and that's what I referred to in the phrase "morally responsible thing to do".

That's one thing.

Hitting a wild animal is something entirely different and, indeed, the morality or the ethics involved are something else entirely. Wild animals do not want human beings around them - there is no "gentle comfort" to be given. To attempt to do so will result in one of two things, or possibly both - extreme stress for the animal and, potentially, injury to the human.

The OP - as it turns out - was referring to having had struck a deer on a road in the middle of nowhere, at night. The OP was not referring to having hit a pet. The two cannot be played by the same rules.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-28-2010, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,005,408 times
Reputation: 20425
Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveHorses View Post
The OP - as it turns out - was referring to having had struck a deer on a road in the middle of nowhere, at night. The OP was not referring to having hit a pet. The two cannot be played by the same rules.
Yeah, but the original post said "if you hit a cat/dog/wild animal" - so one could assume they're talking about pets as well. I agree it's different to hit someone's pet vs a wild animal, but the OP opened a discussion on both situations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2010, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,005,408 times
Reputation: 20425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley01 View Post
I can't stress enough the importance of getting pets microchipped..
It is a good idea to have your pets microchipped, but I learned the hard way that it doesn't always matter. When my sweet Gizmo (cat) was hit & killed by a car in Stockton CA, animal control picked her up and didn't bother to check for a microchip. She was chipped, but it took a week of worry and heartache to learn what happened... I finally went into animal control myself (after calling numerous times), and had the unpleasant task of finding her on the DOA list. When I asked why they didn't scan her and call me, they replied "we don't bother scanning animals who are DOA." WHAT??? So you don't think the owner wants to know their beloved pet is gone? Gizmo also had a collar and tag, btw, but apparently it had fallen off - or possibly was removed by whoever hit her.

Moral of the story is to check with your local animal control, and find out their policy on scanning DOAs for microchips. My sister is an attorney who used to work in city government, so she actually contacted Stockton AC and had the rules changed... she called it the "Gizmo clause," which changed the policies to require scanning of ALL animals, dead or alive. She also contributed money in Gizmo's name, telling them specifically to use it for a portable microchip scanner (to carry in the officer's trucks). Go sister!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2010, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,280 posts, read 6,144,638 times
Reputation: 1805
Interesting discussion. I haven't had the misfortune of hitting an animal with my car, but it's always in the back of my mind when I drive.

I would just urge people to be very careful when approaching an injured animal. I think being cautious around wildlife is pretty much a given, but even the sweetest-tempered pet can become dangerous if they are overtaken by pain and panic. I carry a towel or blanket in my car at all times for many reasons, but one is to keep both of us safe if I ever need to assist an injured animal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2010, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Texas
43,532 posts, read 52,616,956 times
Reputation: 70755
I hit a rabbit once on a dark country road - he ran in front of my car, then back to the side of the road (I sighed in relief), and then ran back into the road right under my tire! I was like, WTF?! Suicide bunny!
I didn't do anything for that rabbit. I am not sure would be much to do.

One night, my ex and I drove home from dinner and saw a figure in the middle of the road. It was a husky that someone had hit and left in the road. He appeared to be dead, but when we got closer (we got out of the car to check on him), he moved and looked at us. He was in really bad shape and close to the end, so my ex called the cops and we sat with him until he was gone (it was a matter of minutes). We were just glad he wasn't alone. The cops came and took him off the road.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2010, 06:48 AM
 
1,688 posts, read 6,907,055 times
Reputation: 1988
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Yeah, but the original post said "if you hit a cat/dog/wild animal" - so one could assume they're talking about pets as well. I agree it's different to hit someone's pet vs a wild animal, but the OP opened a discussion on both situations.
I agree - but my point is (as you state) that they require different actions/reactions. Nothing more really.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2010, 01:17 PM
 
2,890 posts, read 5,386,360 times
Reputation: 4611
A good friend, an animal lover, carries a gun in her car. She has the stomach and heart to put a wild creature out of its misery. It sounds cruel, but think about it . . . . If death is inevitable, would you rather wait an hour in terrible pain or just get it over with.

As for a cat/dog - I would try to get it to a vet, as it might be someone's baby.

Go Gizmo's aunt! What a wonderful way to honor her memory.

Stan4 - it's nice to hear your ex had a good heart and stayed with the husky. That was the kindest gift of all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2010, 04:38 PM
 
511 posts, read 1,983,115 times
Reputation: 743
For a cat/dog I would stop and attempt to get the animal off the road and safely contained and either rush it to the nearest vet myself or contact local animal control- bearing in mind of course the dangers of handling a strange animal in pain.

For wildlife there is not much to do but call game & fish and wait. Here, it is against the law to kill a hit-by-car deer- it must be done by an officer. If you put an injured deer out of it's misery you will face criminal charges. It is also against the law to transport live wildlife, so rushing something like a fox or a raccoon to the vet can also result in criminal charges, not to mention the risk of being exposed to diseases such as rabies. The laws varry a great deal from state to state... it's best to research you state's wildlife laws so that you know what kind of help you can (legally) offer to an injured wild animal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2010, 09:15 AM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,190,235 times
Reputation: 12760
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissNM View Post
A good friend, an animal lover, carries a gun in her car. She has the stomach and heart to put a wild creature out of its misery. It sounds cruel, but think about it . . . . If death is inevitable, would you rather wait an hour in terrible pain or just get it over with.

As for a cat/dog - I would try to get it to a vet, as it might be someone's baby.

Go Gizmo's aunt! What a wonderful way to honor her memory.

Stan4 - it's nice to hear your ex had a good heart and stayed with the husky. That was the kindest gift of all.
While that would be my wish for wild animals too, to put them out of their misery, it is not always legal to do so. In some states shooting an animal out of season, regardless of the reason, will get one in very serious trouble with the law. One is better off to call law enforcement to put the wild animal down if they are not certain of state laws.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2010, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,244 posts, read 14,015,160 times
Reputation: 6063
Quote:
Originally Posted by kahskye View Post
BBM - That's pretty sick! Unless you're a vet who can properly euthanize a dying animal, you call the police or an emergengy vet clinic. Usually the clinic can refer even a wild animal to proper rehab. Just because an animal is wailing, doesn't mean he's close to death. He could be wailing out in fear.
Not everyone lives in an area where the police will assist or where there is a rehab or 24 hour vet clinic. I'm in that situation now. The police will not come out for any animal - domestic or wild - hit by a car and animal control won't respond after hours. And there's no such thing as a rehab clinic for wildlife. Out here we do the best we can. And sadly, if you hit a deer or a dog with no ID in the middle of the night and it's critically injured you have to put it down yourself.

Now I wouldn't run it over again. I'd shoot it. But not everyone carries a gun I guess. Well, around me I'd guess at least 90% of the people do. But then again, only about 10% of the people here would care enough to stop anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top