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Old 11-03-2015, 08:37 AM
 
26,160 posts, read 15,349,598 times
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Yes and although its sad,its the nicest thing you can do!!!


Welcome to city-data Bones 27
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Old 11-03-2015, 09:04 AM
 
2,060 posts, read 1,303,786 times
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I've never hit anything, luckily enough. I remember a time when I was younger and my Mom was driving. A woman driving the car in front had hit a raccoon and pulled over to see what she could do, I guess.

It was easy to see that this raccoon wasn't going to make it, although it was still trying to run away with its front paws, it was basically otherwise squished. My Mom pulled over, got her hatchet from the back of the car (we had been doing yard work at my Dad's old house) and walked up to dispatch the poor thing quickly.

The woman started screaming, but then came to realize that the raccoon was better off dying quickly.
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Old 11-13-2015, 01:04 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
838 posts, read 587,303 times
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I hope these people posting here from the city at least listen to us country folk.

Rule #1-If you hit an animal, and that animal is bigger than you, DO NOT TRY TO HELP. When an animal is hurt, they can lash out in fear. Even a tame animal will bite his owner if hurt enough. We had a neighbor whose poodle was hit right in front of her house. We heard the screaming and didn't know what was happening. She tried to pick her dog up and he bit her right on the face. She had to have 11 stiches. The dog wouldn't let anyone near it. His hip was crushed as well as both back legs. Because we were in a neighborhood we didn't want to shoot the dog. She wanted to call the cops, but they advised her that they don't respond to animal calls unless the animal is blocking a road. She called animal control, who advised her that they didn't respond to calls outside of the city limits. She basically let the poor dog bleed to death in her front yard because she wouldn't let us do anything.

A deer can kick with enough force to break your legs. A horse, moose, cow can kill you. If you don't have a firearm stay in your vehicle. Call law enforcement if your vehicle is too damaged to move. Let them deal with the animal. Most times they are going to shoot the animal, whether you like it or not.

Please, for the love of God do not get out of your vehicle if you hit a bear, or a wolf, or a wild pig. These aninals sometimes travel in groups and they have been known to defend one another. Sure the one you hit maybe as dead as a doornail, but his buddies could be right in the woods.
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Old 11-13-2015, 06:44 PM
 
26,160 posts, read 15,349,598 times
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Ya lower life forms DO NOT UNDERSTAND you are trying to help......

Its risky as ya dont know what they may do......
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Old 11-13-2015, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,747 posts, read 4,163,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveHorses View Post
Meanwhile back on planet Earth.... NO wildlife agency is going to come out if you've just clipped Fido or Fluffy. Nor should they quite frankly, it's not their remit.

a) the "correct" answer to this all depends on where it happens - if you're in an urban or suburban area, fine. You can call law enforcement, you can get to a vet, you can do any number of things. If you're either traveling somewhere you're not familiar with (ie, a scenic area) or in a very rural area (where one is more likely to hit wildlife, just statistically speaking), you're faced with a whole different set of criteria.

b) as the OP stated, if you're on a back road in the arse end of nowhere, things are rather different. There's a huge and vast difference between hitting a deer, a raccoon, or even a wild hog - and clipping Fido on a street with a 35 mph speed limit. There's just no way what is practical, or indeed morally responsible, to do in one instance is the same in the other instance.

OP - deer are tricky and you're lucky you weren't injured. The statistics (easily available but it's too late and I can't be bothered) of the number of humans killed every year by a deer through the windscreen is quite phenomenal. With deer - if the deer moves off, the deer moves off and it probably will survive. If the deer is unable to move off &/or tries to get up and can't (deer necks are easily broken), is seriously visibly injured then the kindest, most human thing you can do is shoot it. If you don't happen to have a firearm about your person, call someone who does. If you're in an area with no phone reception... well, that's between you and your conscious but the fact of the matter remains that you are trying to put the animal out of its misery as quickly as possible.

So while the OP poses the question about running over an animal a second time and is lambasted for it... well, that's all very well and good for town-folk. However, in great swaths of emptiness, things aren't quite so clear cut. According to what's been written here, the animal should be left to suffer for... some indistinct period of time (assuming there is a way of contacting someone, which is a great big, fat assumption) because to aim a motor vehicle at some sort of injured/dying animal a second time is just a bit distasteful? Not in my book - if you haven't got a gun and the animal is seriously injured then you do what it takes to put the animal out of its misery.
Best answer so far. You do what you have to do in the middle of nowhere with no gun and no one else around.

My friend drives transport and she carries an ax to kill BADLY injured wildlife if there is no other way to help them. She was chased around and around her transport by a mother moose one time when she hit a moose calf. Finally another trucker came along and distracted the mother while my friend did the sad deed.

My brother used to drive trains in the wilderness of northern Ontario. Same thing: he carried an ax and backed up the whole train to put moose, deer and other wildlife out of their misery.

One thing I want to warn everyone about picking up cats and dogs: they can be very vicious when they are injured. If you have a pair of gloves handy, put them on, AND cover the animal's eyes with a coat or jacket to keep them calmer if you decide to take them to a vet. Even your OWN pet can be vicious when badly injured. Use caution.
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Old 11-13-2015, 08:43 PM
 
1,242 posts, read 1,255,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dude111 View Post
Ya lower life forms DO NOT UNDERSTAND you are trying to help......
Lower life forms? If that's how you think of animals then you've got a lot of evolving to do. People in pain can do some pretty nasty stuff too.

If I hit an animal that's a manageable size like a cat, dog, or other small wild critter, then I'll get out and see if I can help. If it's bad off then I'll finish it off. If it can be saved, I'll try to safely transport it using gloves, a box, or putting something over it. If it's big and mean I'll call animal control or (depending on the condition) leave it or finish it off. Can't stand to watch something suffer.

I keep a nylon leash in my car which can be used as a muzzle and a pair of gloves every since I ran into this issue a few years back.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Destin, FL
237 posts, read 169,285 times
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Thankfully the only thing I have ever hit was a suicidal squirrel. I tried my best to avoid him, even stopping and honking so he would run away, little ahole still came back and found his way under my tire.

I would be devastated if I hit someone's pet.
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Old 11-29-2015, 12:12 PM
 
Location: McKinleyville, California
6,413 posts, read 9,124,206 times
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This thread was not easy to read. Wednesday, day before Thanksgiving, I was exiting on an exit in Arcata California, I saw a small chihuahua, white running up the ramp towards the freeway, 101, I pulled over right away and got out hoping to stop it, the poor little guy just kept on running north onto the freeway. The girl behind me also pulled over, we chased that little guy for almost half a mile and by then he was over 500 hundred feet ahead of us in the slow lane, cars swerving around him, but he dashed into the fast lane and got hit by a car, then hit by a tow truck and a small truck. He ran nearly 3000 feet on the highway.

I texted the lady that works at our animal shelter on Facebook and within an hour had found out his name and that he had got off his leash in town and took off running. The dog was visiting his owner going to school here at the college. I and the girl running with me tried so hard to get the cars to stop, but it is 65 on 101, he did not stand a chance and it was a busy time of day at 4 pm.

I have five dogs, have always had dogs, would hate to have one get hit and treated like a nothing. I called the owner within an hour, she said the people that hit her dog, Romeo, got off the highway and came back around to retrieve his body and tags and that was how I found out about him. I have offered one of my redwood trees to be planted in his memory along the highway. Our mailman saw me running along the highway waving my arms and yelling, then my truck parked at the offramp. He did not know that a dog had been hit and killed. I use to run and ran really hard and fast, but that little dog was too fast for us, plus I was wearing my steel toe work boots. I cannot stress the importance of harnesses for dogs. Through Facebook I have connected with the dogs owner and the girl that ran with me, we are all grieving for this dog, there were three other people in a truck that had tried to help too and a family in an RV that blocked any other cars from hitting him again. Humboldt county is small and the same people use the highway every day, we find we are all connected someway or another through someone we know in common on Facebook. I know the girl that ran with me from having seen her somewhere, but we never met before this. We also had a cow get hit on 101 just down the highway from us Friday night, right before midnight, no one knows how it got on the highway.

Many years ago, 32 to be exact, I lived in lower Berkeley near both the railroad and the highway. A neighbor a few blocks from the tracks would always let his dog go for his own walks, sometimes appearing 6 or more blocks from where he lived. I was walking my dog to the park one morning and without me knowing it, that dog had followed behind us. I had turned around in time to see him crossing the tracks. I yelled at him to go back home, I heard a freight train coming and he just stood there, I saw him get hit, there was nothing I could do. I felt so bad for the dog and so angry at the owner. I knew where the owner lived, knocked on their door with no answer, so left a note telling them what happened to their dog and where he was at. I am so careful with our dogs and our cat is not allowed outside and when we had four cats, they were not allowed outside.
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Old 11-30-2015, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,302 posts, read 4,148,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDragonslayer View Post
This thread was not easy to read. Wednesday, day before Thanksgiving, I was exiting on an exit in Arcata California, I saw a small chihuahua, white running up the ramp towards the freeway, 101, I pulled over right away and got out hoping to stop it, the poor little guy just kept on running north onto the freeway. The girl behind me also pulled over, we chased that little guy for almost half a mile...
OT tip for anyone else who might find themselves in this sort of situation in the future: try chasing the dog for a short distance, then abruptly turning and running away from it. Most dogs love to play chase games; there's a reasonable chance the dog will turn and start chasing after you, and you'll be able to lead it away from immediate danger.

(I'm not saying it would have worked in this particular case, or that it's guaranteed to work in other cases, but it's a useful trick to have in your mental tool kit.)
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Old 12-01-2015, 10:27 AM
 
Location: McKinleyville, California
6,413 posts, read 9,124,206 times
Reputation: 4225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
OT tip for anyone else who might find themselves in this sort of situation in the future: try chasing the dog for a short distance, then abruptly turning and running away from it. Most dogs love to play chase games; there's a reasonable chance the dog will turn and start chasing after you, and you'll be able to lead it away from immediate danger.

(I'm not saying it would have worked in this particular case, or that it's guaranteed to work in other cases, but it's a useful trick to have in your mental tool kit.)
I have five dogs now, have had dogs all my life, I play tag with my dogs all the time. When I found a lost listing for the little guy later, it said that he was afraid of strangers and would run. He was running scared to begin with in a strange town, must have ran three blocks before running up the offramp. Most dogs listen to me if I give them firm commands, this little guy was not listening to anyone. Most of the time I have to fend off the dogs that want to slobber me with kisses or get pats and pets. I always carry an extra leash or rope in my truck, just in case. In my experience, little dogs are most likely to run scared like this guy did.
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