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Old 06-23-2011, 09:59 AM
 
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My dad lives on 40 acres and he has three big dogs and two small doxies and everytime he takes the dogs out for a walk he takes the shot gun too this is why because if my dad even sees anything in the woods remotely close he fires one shot in the air to let em know to take off cause the next shot is going through it . My dad has seen owls , hawks and coyotes and you name it on his property and some bears in the wintertime but he is a no nonsense kind of guy and will take care of business if he needs . Yes your animals are in danger if they are under ten lbs as another poster said .
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Old 06-28-2011, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
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Most of the tales of pets taken by birds of prey are bunk and if true, almost always involve kittens or puppies. The only bird that is a real threat to an adult cat or small dog is the golden eagle, a female can weigh up to 15 pounds. All predators have a high sense of risk/reward, and for a raptor to attack a mammal predator is very risky for the bird. An injured leg or broken wing dooms it to death. Raptor experts performed lifting tests some time ago, and it was found that the maximum weight that could be lifted and flown away with was one third the birds weight, no more. That means that a 13 pound eagle that kills a small 5 pound cat could not fly away with it. A great horned owl, widely viewed as a cat killer, averages 3 1/2 pounds, 4 at the most. For it to attack a predator at least double or even triple its weight would very likely cost it its life. Hawks, eagles, and owls for the most part hunt rodents and other small mammals, birds, fish, and carrion, not adult cats and dogs.
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Old 06-28-2011, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Rural Western TN
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just because it cant carry away more than about 1/3rd, doesnt mean it wont take the prey if it thinks its an easy catch...

ive seen hawks take full grown chickens that weigh 3-5lbs (i have chickens...i have weighed our chickens so i do know how big a normal egg laying chicken is...)
ive also seen birds of prey take on larger prey that was too big to take away, they simply land and eat on the ground if they feel its safe enough.

a "normal" sized dog or large cat id agree, not typically at risk, but many folks (myself included) have much smaller dogs, and the likes of toy breeds like chihuahuas and smaller cats ARE at risk. (my full grown female cat is only 4lbs, my smallest chihuhaua is 3lbs...my chickens are bigger than some of the dogs or cats...

rabbit is a main prey item for many raptors...and there are many dogs and small cats that are "rabbit like" from high above...and ive met many a rabit that outweighs 4 of our 6 dogs lol
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Old 06-28-2011, 02:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Most of the tales of pets taken by birds of prey are bunk and if true, almost always involve kittens or puppies.
A lot of it is mixing actual events and tales.

In the USA it's highly unlikely that any animal weighing more than 10 lbs (the number the US fish & Wildlife uses) can be lifted by any known US bird of prey. I think the mythbusters did it and came up with maybe 8 lbs or so. Outside the USA there are birds of prey that can lift more and that's where fact and fiction gets mixed. If you hear a person in some state say a bird took their 12 lb dog, we all know its false because it just can;t happen, but if it happen in Kenya, it's possible.

i think what happens is some bodys over 10lb dog was balled up and a BOP attempted to snach it but didn;t and the dog ran away and was found 1/2 mile away with cuts on its back so the owners think that it had to be the bird that took it that far away. So they know there are BOP outside the Us that may be able to do it so by god, that had to be what happened here.

I have seen BOP snatch small animals and my educated guess is they were all very small, none over maybe 6 lbs max. Also a lot of these stories are stories told from one person to another to another and soon some falcon snatch a hippo from the local zoo. Since there heard it from someone they don;t want to call a fibber, they repeat it over and over as if true even though scientifically it's not possible.
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Old 07-27-2011, 02:15 AM
 
Location: OCEAN BREEZES AND VIEWS SAN CLEMENTE
17,410 posts, read 7,249,915 times
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I have seen the terrible effects of what a coyote looks like attacking a little dog, almost killing it, if my friends did not come out when they did, and scare the coyotes. The terrible screeching and howling, is such a awful sound. Ripping apart the stomach area, it was the most terrible sight. The dog did live, but had major problems, poor thing.

We have a lot of Hawks all kinds where i live, i have seen them with their usual lunch, mice, squirrels, rabbits. But i do need to know something. Our little dog maybe not so little to some is a good 16 17 pounds, and very tough. Could a hawk, swoon down and try and take our dylan.
Is it true that hawks watch their prey for a while before actually swooning down and taking them. Could they also do this with smaller dogs and cats. I have personally watched a hawk a couple months ago, it was mostly red, with some gold coloring. This dang thing, had to come and sit on our fence, and eat it 's friggin luch, it was disgusting. This thing would not go away, until it was finished. I worry because our two dogs go out to use the bathroom out there. And this hawk, likes to make its presence known on our fence for whatever reason. Do i need to worry about this.
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Old 07-27-2011, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Rural Western TN
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at 16lbs your dog wouldnt be at risk from a hawk, 5lbs seems to be their tops.

if theres a nest neerby hes rotecting then he could begin to 'dive" to scare if the dogs get too close, but otherwise i highly doubt hes going to try anything on a 16lb dog
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Old 07-27-2011, 07:43 AM
 
29,468 posts, read 17,691,317 times
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Here an eagle deposited a fawn on some power lines recently.



I would agree that 10lbs would put you outside the CARRYING capacity of any bird in north america. However, eagles etc. are notorious for not carrying scales with them and might attack your pet anyway. They are capable of delivering a fatal wound instantly (spine etc.) Bald eagles have killed young deer and pronghorn etc so frankly I'd be keeping an eye open.

Good points about the coyotes, they are a threat to almost ANY dog. Read an article about someone with an 80lb lab that a coyote lured into chasing it and the lab spotted the danger and broke off the chase right as it was about to be encircled by the hiding coyotes. I've seen coyotes in broad daylight in my subdivsion and they would certainly snack on my 18lb dog.
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Old 07-30-2011, 02:50 AM
 
Location: OCEAN BREEZES AND VIEWS SAN CLEMENTE
17,410 posts, read 7,249,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Here an eagle deposited a fawn on some power lines recently.



I would agree that 10lbs would put you outside the CARRYING capacity of any bird in north america. However, eagles etc. are notorious for not carrying scales with them and might attack your pet anyway. They are capable of delivering a fatal wound instantly (spine etc.) Bald eagles have killed young deer and pronghorn etc so frankly I'd be keeping an eye open.

Good points about the coyotes, they are a threat to almost ANY dog. Read an article about someone with an 80lb lab that a coyote lured into chasing it and the lab spotted the danger and broke off the chase right as it was about to be encircled by the hiding coyotes. I've seen coyotes in broad daylight in my subdivsion and they would certainly snack on my 18lb dog.

That is good to know, and our little guy, just would not know and would try and attack the hawk, i have no doubt, he does not realize he is not a german shepard.

We do not have Eagles to worry about, but the hawks and coyotes we do. I too have seen coyotes in the daytime, browsing around i guess.

One time i went outside to check on our cat, and he was hiding under the car, and would not move, that is not like his usual self. Well i looked up the Street to my right, and there it was staring me down a friggin huge coyote. This dang thing, started coming towards me, so i got out the hose, and hosed the crap out of he or she. Got nervous for a while, because it just stayed still, looked me down, then went away. I was not going to let the dang coyote do something to my cat, i just was not.

I am noticing more and more coyotes, and seeing a lot of dead ones on the road, what is going on.
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Old 08-01-2011, 08:15 AM
 
29,468 posts, read 17,691,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Most of the tales of pets taken by birds of prey are bunk and if true, almost always involve kittens or puppies. The only bird that is a real threat to an adult cat or small dog is the golden eagle, a female can weigh up to 15 pounds. All predators have a high sense of risk/reward, and for a raptor to attack a mammal predator is very risky for the bird. An injured leg or broken wing dooms it to death. Raptor experts performed lifting tests some time ago, and it was found that the maximum weight that could be lifted and flown away with was one third the birds weight, no more. That means that a 13 pound eagle that kills a small 5 pound cat could not fly away with it. A great horned owl, widely viewed as a cat killer, averages 3 1/2 pounds, 4 at the most. For it to attack a predator at least double or even triple its weight would very likely cost it its life. Hawks, eagles, and owls for the most part hunt rodents and other small mammals, birds, fish, and carrion, not adult cats and dogs.
Sorry, but owls and other large birds of prey will definitely take out animals 3x thier weight and flying off with the prey is not always a requirement. They can eat some, rip up the prey and carry off smaller pieces and so forth. (Owls have 250 documented prey species including things like porcupines, racoon etc. which they silently swoop upon and pretty much instantly kill.)

There are many many you-tube videos of bald eagles putting the hurt down on things like coyotes.

P.S. The largest bird of prey ever, Haasts eagle (25-30lbs) used to prey on Moa's weighing >10x as much and Maori oral tradition has them occasionally killing people.
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Old 08-01-2011, 08:23 AM
 
29,468 posts, read 17,691,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by california-jewel View Post
That is good to know, and our little guy, just would not know and would try and attack the hawk, i have no doubt, he does not realize he is not a german shepard.

We do not have Eagles to worry about, but the hawks and coyotes we do. I too have seen coyotes in the daytime, browsing around i guess.

One time i went outside to check on our cat, and he was hiding under the car, and would not move, that is not like his usual self. Well i looked up the Street to my right, and there it was staring me down a friggin huge coyote. This dang thing, started coming towards me, so i got out the hose, and hosed the crap out of he or she. Got nervous for a while, because it just stayed still, looked me down, then went away. I was not going to let the dang coyote do something to my cat, i just was not.

I am noticing more and more coyotes, and seeing a lot of dead ones on the road, what is going on.
They follow natural population cycles and on top of that there are many other factors.

For example, in 1900 the countryside was dotted with small farms and hunting season or not a deer, pheasant, turkey, coyote, wolf etc. was fair game for either the dinner table or to remove a threat to livestock. Today, the countryside is thinned out and with the grocery store and the market for furs etc. down there just isn't as much pressure on either predators or more importantly their food sources. Deer population in the entire US was estimated at around 1million in 1900 and is probably more like 40million today. My dad tells me that in 1960 seeing a deer around was a big deal and you'd never see Turkey etc etc.
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