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Old 09-08-2018, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Canada
1,401 posts, read 839,997 times
Reputation: 4453

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TenderFrost View Post
I am not sure, even if you train your dogs to stay in the other room, if they internally don't suffer, as they merely obey your command, but certainly aren't exactly happy about it. I can feel it and see it every time I meet another Husky who starts having fun, but then the training kicks in, bite inhibition kicks in, killing all the fun instantly (you can see it in their eyes)...
I have to agree with OttoR on this one. If one has a dog who displays dependency toward the owner or separation anxiety issues, then teaching the dog to stay on command and not follow the owner around like a constant shadow is part of the process of breaking that dependency. I had a dog with (moderately severe) separation anxiety, and from the beginning taught her to sit/stay whenever she'd automatically jump up to follow me. Positive reinforcement and reward integrated with this training helped quite a bit in breaking that 'bond' (which to me isn't really a bond, it's a fear-based response by the dog in needing to feel secure by being with the owner 100% of the time). When I got my present dog, I also integrated this as part of his training, so he wouldn't start depending upon me to feel secure. Working on the issue by using positive reinforcement methods should eventually teach the dog to be secure on his or her own, and no longer feeling afraid/dependent/insecure, which is the entire point of the training.
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Old 09-12-2018, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 44,915,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bassetluv View Post
I have to agree with OttoR on this one. If one has a dog who displays dependency toward the owner or separation anxiety issues, then teaching the dog to stay on command and not follow the owner around like a constant shadow is part of the process of breaking that dependency.
I mostly agree with that too... my dog loves to be near me, of course, but I taught him early on to respect my personal space (and to not be anxious when I'm out of his sight). He often chooses to sleep on the patio when I'm in the living room, on the bedroom or bathroom floors when I'm asleep, and never puts up a fuss when I leave the house. Part of that is because I don't make a fuss either! When it's time for me to go to work, I simply toss him a treat and say "bye, Rudy" then walk out the door. He's never even been inside of a crate, as he has never given me any reason to get one.

The only time I (unintentionally) get emotional about leaving is when I'm going on a trip without him, and he can definitely feel my sadness - then gets anxious and sad himself. They feel and reflect our moods, so a mellow owner usually raises a mellow dog! People often ask how/why he is so calm, and I respond "because I am calm by nature." Ever notice how the high-strung owners tend to have spastic dogs?

Disclaimer: Obviously if you adopt an older/adult dog, their behaviors aren't as much under your control; so I'm only referring to dogs we've raised since puppy-hood.
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Old 09-13-2018, 05:03 PM
 
310 posts, read 85,497 times
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OK, I think I get the point now and can't really find anything inherently wrong with this approach, as long as it doesn't just suppress dog's base emotions (like, say, with bite inhibition).

You're basically saying, that the dog "grows" emotionally, assuming I get your meaning correctly ?


But, this is all generalization, not taking into account the nature of the dog. What about the temperament factor ?
I have intentionally picked the smallest husky of the litter, even though I was initially eying a different one. While all the other puppies were ferociously fighting for food in one huge pile, she was just shivering in the corner, afraid of all other puppies, hence deprived of food, hence smallest of them all.

She still gets scared of great many things, though much less than 18 months ago. Even at a dog park, she is different than other huskies, who are usually mellow (ignoring anything and everything).

My point is, that certain temperaments, by nature, don't really care for the human companionship (other than to show human the domination), especially if they're alpha male, or aggressive.
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Old 09-14-2018, 09:54 AM
 
1,201 posts, read 414,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
.

. They feel and reflect our moods, so a mellow owner usually raises a mellow dog! People often ask how/why he is so calm, and I respond "because I am calm by nature." Ever notice how the high-strung owners tend to have spastic dogs?

Disclaimer: Obviously if you adopt an older/adult dog, their behaviors aren't as much under your control; so I'm only referring to dogs we've raised since puppy-hood.
This is so spot on. This is also why people tend to have the same issues with every dog they have. It has been my experience that even older dogs/foster dogs pretty quickly begin mirroring their owner’s personality. All of my dogs, despite being different breeds, have had similar calm, laidback personalities, and a high level of self control. I had a long time friend comment to be in front of a bunch of other friends how I have always been “so LUCKY” to get great, easy dogs!!! She said this because every dog she had had was, in her words, psycho! I pointed out “luck” had nothing to do with it!
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Old 09-14-2018, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Talmadge, San Diego, CA
13,292 posts, read 25,176,194 times
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I would reconsider getting a second pet. It's going to cost you more per month, and more vet bills.
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Old 09-14-2018, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Talmadge, San Diego, CA
13,292 posts, read 25,176,194 times
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He already got the puppy.

2 month old puppy question...
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:13 PM
 
2,677 posts, read 1,057,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RunD1987 View Post
Hi, right now we have our ten year old rag doll cat. We were thinking of adopting this chihuahua mix and the agency says the dog is good with cats.

Right now have a 600 sq ft apartment. Next year we plan to upgrade to the 1 bdrm 700 sq ft apartment in March.

The cat has her own corner with cat tree, a bench she sleeps on, feeding area, and a dirt box. If we get a dog we corner off with gates the cat area so it be a little sanctuary for her not feel stressed.

Then the dog would have an area that is the size of 2 large play pens to their self and can easily run around.

So good or bad idea?

If we do get the dog plan on walking it 6 to 8 times a day.
In my region the SPCA will not allow adoption if the space at home is too small for the cat or dog to have a place away from unwanted noise and activity. Imagine if you were an indoor cat or dog. You can't go outside for fresh air anytime you want or go anywhere alone and quiet. You are stuffed into a corner in one 600 sq ft room with the TV and radio on all the time, overpowering smells, and people talking back and forth and walking around. Do the dog a favor and leave the idea alone.
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