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Old 09-14-2018, 09:47 AM
 
1,201 posts, read 421,666 times
Reputation: 3149

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Our vet has a special room for this purpose. It is decorated like a house and has outside air, toys, etc. We bring their blanket. It still scares them. The vet scares most animals and they hate the smell of the place. The one time I went, our dog was barely coherent anyway, she was in a great deal of pain. She was able to walk in, but barely.

The one that went badly, was a youngish dog. He developed a mental disorder that kept him constantly at the 6th of 7 stages of aggression. He woudl be sweet as pie and then suddenly randomly attack someone even people he knew and loved. After a year of trying to solve the problem, we decided it was just too dangerous to keep him alive. We could keep in inside/leashed/muzzles, but if he ever got out, he could easily kill someone he was 190 pounds.

We have always had very large dogs. They do not live very long (8-10 years if you are lucky). We have had to put down three dogs, a cat and a chicken (long story). It is hard.

For me the hardest pet loss was my Cockatoo Orville who was 30 years old. He was my buddy for most of my life. He died at home suddenly after surgery. I was away on a business trip. It would have been better for me if we had put him to sleep so I could say goodbye. My family stuck him in a bag and put him outside to freeze so I could see him before we buried him. It was awful. I think it might have been better if they hadn't, but I wish we would have known he would die from the surgery and could have put him to sleep gently rather than making him endure the surgery and then die anyway. He was miserable for the few days following the surgery.

I was lucky as a kid. Nearly all of our pets outlived my tenure at home. We had extremely long lived pets. (My favorite cat "Fred" lived to be 22).

I think it is especially hard on kids. Our first family dog was much beloved. He was the most awesome dog ever and still the best we have had or met. He had a giant tumor and could not stand up. We knew we would have to put him down. One day my wife decided to have the vet come to our house and put him to sleep while everyone was away. She thought it would be easier on everyone. She had me come home early to help the vet assistants load him into their van before the kids got home (he weight 210). The kids were furious they were not told and did not get to say a last goodbye. It took them a year to forgive her. Just FYI, that is a bad choice. Seemed like it might be better for them to just have him gone when they got home, but it was not.
I agree! We had a couple dogs that had to be put down when I was growing up. I loved both of these dogs dearly and as a little girl growing up out in the country, the dogs were my best friends. My mother shot a couple dogs (for killing chickens or harming the livestock or showing aggression) and a couple ďran away.Ē I NEVER believed her and was always so angry and upset to come home to a dog to find it was permanently gone with no opportunity for me to say good-bye. When we had to put our beautiful first Rhodesian down, I took all my kids. They were young, elementary school age, and were given a choice. We all sat on the floor with her and comforted her through the process. The vet let us stay in the room awhile with her while everyone sat there sobbing and stroking her. One of my sons asked if he could keep her collar. After everyone had a good cry, the vet came in and took her body away and we went home. Death is an important lesson for kids - every living thing dies. Learning to cope with death and move on is part of growing up. It does no one any good to pretend otherwise. I would have never let our friend and companion of many years, that 3 of my children had never known life without, be lead off by a vet tech to an exam room to be euthanized scared, in pain, and all alone just because we didnít have the spine to go in with her. It was hard, it was painful, it was incredibly sad to be a part of but it was the kindest thing for the dog and best for the kids. I have ZERO respect for anyone that lets their companion go out alone. Those people are selfish cowards.
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Old 09-14-2018, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,536 posts, read 62,986,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OttoR View Post
I agree! We had a couple dogs that had to be put down when I was growing up. I loved both of these dogs dearly and as a little girl growing up out in the country, the dogs were my best friends. My mother shot a couple dogs (for killing chickens or harming the livestock or showing aggression) and a couple “ran away.” I NEVER believed her and was always so angry and upset to come home to a dog to find it was permanently gone with no opportunity for me to say good-bye. When we had to put our beautiful first Rhodesian down, I took all my kids. They were young, elementary school age, and were given a choice. We all sat on the floor with her and comforted her through the process. The vet let us stay in the room awhile with her while everyone sat there sobbing and stroking her. One of my sons asked if he could keep her collar. After everyone had a good cry, the vet came in and took her body away and we went home. Death is an important lesson for kids - every living thing dies. Learning to cope with death and move on is part of growing up. It does no one any good to pretend otherwise. I would have never let our friend and companion of many years, that 3 of my children had never known life without, be lead off by a vet tech to an exam room to be euthanized scared, in pain, and all alone just because we didn’t have the spine to go in with her. It was hard, it was painful, it was incredibly sad to be a part of but it was the kindest thing for the dog and best for the kids. I have ZERO respect for anyone that lets their companion go out alone. Those people are selfish cowards.
I would be concerned with kids present to have one go like my wife described our insane dog we had to put down young. He had seizures and yelped/screamed for several minutes. We thought the vet messed up but they said that happens sometimes. Would not want kids to be there for that. In fact, I am very glad I wasn't (and I did not even like that dog).
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Old 09-14-2018, 11:18 AM
 
1,201 posts, read 421,666 times
Reputation: 3149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
I would be concerned with kids present to have one go like my wife described our insane dog we had to put down young. He had seizures and yelped/screamed for several minutes. We thought the vet messed up but they said that happens sometimes. Would not want kids to be there for that. In fact, I am very glad I wasn't (and I did not even like that dog).
I was concerned and spoke with the vet beforehand hand about it and if there might be anything upsetting to the kids (other than that their dog was dying). He assured me it would be like she went to sleep and that’s exactly how it went. He was kind and was very good to explain to the children why we needed to do it (because she was suffering) and what he was doing - “This is just a sedative that is going to make her very relaxed and sleepy so she won’t be frightened,” “this shot is going to make her heart stop instantly, she is unaware and she will not feel any fear or pain.” We stroked her with her head in my lap (we were sitting around her on the floor) as the sedative kicked in and she relaxed and went to sleep. Then he gave the injection and you could just instantly see the life leave her and her mouth sagged open but otherwise she never made a movement. He listened to make sure her heart had stopped and that was it. She was starving to death and her sustenance had come from an IV and she had pooped beforehand so we didn’t even have to deal with her bowels emptying.

With a foster dog, she was very nervous and they came up front to the waiting room and gave her a sedative as she sat on my lap. It took two doses and they said they gave her enough to drop a Great Dane. I held her on my lap stroking her until she relaxed completely. She still didn’t go to sleep. I carried her back and laid her on the table. It was waist high so I bent over and laid my body over hers and talked to her and rubbed her head, crying like a baby. Again, when they gave the injection, it was instantaneous. She was dead in a split second, really before the syringe was even pulled out. I’ve never heard of an animal properly euthanized having a reaction like you described but agree I would NOT want my children witnessing something like that! Nor would I want to see it and quite frankly, I would be livid if that how my dog went out.

What’s really hard is being with a horse and watching such a majestic beast go down. :-(
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Old 09-14-2018, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
9,623 posts, read 10,341,622 times
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I've been present for more than I wish to have been. Growing up, my sisters just couldn't bear to be present. I did it, because I didn't want our beloved pet to be alone.

Our last dog was put down about 3 years ago. It was tough as I really loved that dog. As much as I didn't want to be there, I couldn't NOT be there to comfort here.


All 6-7 of the euthanizations I've been present for have been peaceful. They just close their eyes.
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Old 09-14-2018, 11:40 AM
 
7,982 posts, read 3,468,264 times
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For most this is very difficult to do. After reading the previous posts, Iíll be there for my dog when his time comes, after all heís been there for me all these years. Thatís the least I could do for him. Iíll be crying and sad but he has given me a great life with his companionship.
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Old 09-14-2018, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,093 posts, read 5,912,934 times
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[quote=Tominftl;53084687]For most this is very difficult to do.


After reading the previous posts, Iíll be there for my dog when his time comes, after all heís been there for me all these years.


----------



It's quite crushing but I just make myself think of the pet and put my grief on hold until I get home.

Then, collapse in tears...
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Old 09-14-2018, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,708 posts, read 755,612 times
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I must be among the 10%. Both my dogs died in my arms after the injection. I was there to comfort them. Both were very ill and suffering when the time came. The first was 13, the second 15.


I find it tragic that we can mercifully put an end to the suffering of our animals but we can't do it for the people we love when they are suffering. Sigh.
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Old 09-14-2018, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,440 posts, read 2,766,106 times
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When my dog died, he peed on the vet. It's a reflex reaction, but he got her straight on. She said, Well, you got me one last time, didn't you?" and she was crying at the same time.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,756 posts, read 4,175,271 times
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I wish every vet made house calls for euthanasia. It would be so much less traumatic on the animals AND easier on the owners to not have to make that horrible, final drive to the vet's office.

I have been present for EVERY dog (and one cat), we've owned when they were being put down.

The last euthanasia on our beloved heart dog, really PISSED me off. The catheter method is so much easier on them and this vet didn't do it. We were on a trip and it was a vet we didn't know. She was a tiny little Yorkie/Poo and the vet just stuck the needle into her forearm and it HURT her enough to make her snap at the vet. That poor little dog never snapped at anyone in her whole 16 years and it made my husband and I sick to think that her last few seconds on earth were painful. You already feel so sad and horrible, but to have that happen was so much worse.

The dog before her had a catheter inserted into her for the euthanasia. She was cuddled in a soft blanket in my arms and the vet asked me if it was time and I said okay. He sat across from me with a plunger in his hand that was attached to a catheter to her. He just plunged it down and she was gone. She was looking up at me directly into my eyes and slowly lowered her head with no pain at all. It was sad of course, but so very peaceful.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,962 posts, read 22,127,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
An article on Dailymail.com quoted a "tired, broken-hearted vet" in South Africa as saying most people don't understand that if they do not stay with their pet during euthanasia, the pet ends up frightened and looking around desperately for their owner as they are euthanized.

Broke my heart. Vets say it is the responsibility of the owner to be there. I agree...it's hard but our last responsibility to our beloved pet.
Oh my gosh. This broke my heart, too. And quite frankly, it surprised me. I would have thought that the percentage would be reversed, that 90% of pet owners would want very much to be with their pet for euthanasia. I can't imagine not being with my pet. Euthanasia is most often chosen as the most compassionate option for a terminally ill or injured animal. So why would someone choose to not be compassionate enough to be with their pet for the procedure? Wow. I can't believe how upset this just made me!

I wonder if things are maybe different in South Africa than they are in the U.S. I wonder if someone were to start a poll on this forum, asking people if they stay with their pet for euthanasia, what the results would show.

(I'm glad you posted this, though, because I saw the original article as it was posted on Facebook recently, and than couldn't find it again. I googled "tired, broken-hearted vet" and it immediately popped up. This time I'm saving the link.)
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