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Old 09-14-2018, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,093 posts, read 5,897,864 times
Reputation: 30347

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
Oh my gosh. This broke my heart, too. And quite frankly, it surprised me. I would have thought that the percentage would be reversed, that 90% of pet owners would want very much to be with their pet for euthanasia. I can't imagine not being with my pet. Euthanasia is most often chosen as the most compassionate option for a terminally ill or injured animal. So why would someone choose to not be compassionate enough to be with their pet for the procedure? Wow. I can't believe how upset this just made me!

I know, I was upset too...wonder just how correct 90% is when I posted this...the vet was in SAfrica so maybe that figure came from there too.

I think we have very compassionate animal people over the whole country... by the answers here, CD posters certainly are...
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Old 09-14-2018, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,959 posts, read 22,113,760 times
Reputation: 10690
I've got to post one quick story about one cat I had to euthanize. (I've posted this before, but it was several years ago.) Anyway, her name was Annie and she was 18 years old at the time. Of all the pets I've ever had (both dogs and cats), Annie was the only one I never felt a real closeness with. I got her as a kitten and tried really hard to connect with her, but she just was too independent to really care. She'd occasionally want to be petted but most of the time, she didn't seem to have any desire for much human contact, much less love.

It was a September day of 1995. I made an appointment and took her in to the vet. When the vet asked me if I wanted to be with her, I said, "Of course." The vet didn't have me hold her, although I'm sure if I'd asked to she'd have let me. Instead she put down a soft blanket on her exam table and I laid Annie down on it. The vet and I talked for a couple of minutes and then she gave Annie the shot. I stood by her and petted her as the drug took effect but she was actually facing away from me. Then, suddenly, she turned her head, kind of craning to make eye contact with me. In 18 years, she'd never really made eye contact, but she did that day. She looked at me like she was looking into my soul. We just looked intently into each other's eyes until she died, and I honestly felt like she was trying to tell me, "I love you, even though it probably never seemed like I did, and I know you love me. So thank you for taking care of me and being my mom. I'll see you on the other side of the bridge."

Okay, now I'm really crying.
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,756 posts, read 4,169,753 times
Reputation: 15485
This might be hard for some posters to read, but it is something you should be aware of:

I see some of you were with your dog at the time of euthanasia and IMO, that is the right thing to do.

The next thing you should do is take your dog's body with you when you leave. If you leave it, your beloved pet's final resting place is in a heap of garbage. Don't fool yourself into thinking that the vets have a nice place under a tree somewhere peaceful to bury your beloved pet. No, the body gets taken to the dump.

When I worked at our local humane society, some people would bring their pets in to be euthanized and disposed of. So not only they weren't there for the dog in its final moments, the body went to the dump. I found it very sad that someone could do that to their pet and made sure I informed them as kindly as possible where the body was going to end up. Sadly, most of them didn't care and just left.

If it's winter and the ground is frozen, most vets have freezers for storage. You will have to pay for that storage until the ground thaws. Yes, I know in most places it is illegal to bury an animal in a yard. I would do it under the cover of darkness in my yard if need be. Put a nice flower bed on top.

OR: There are pet cemeteries.
OR: Some vets offer cremation services.
OR: Ask a friend with a larger back yard if you can bury your dog.
OR: If you have to, take a drive into a quiet wooded area, dig a hole and properly dispose of your dog's body.

Note to add: it MUST be a deep hole so that predators don't get at the body.

I just can't imagine how people can be comfortable having their dog's body in a dump for all eternity, so this is the purpose of my post. Just to make you aware.
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:11 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,287 posts, read 4,865,859 times
Reputation: 21683
My half brother is a vet tech in a neighboring town. When an animal has to be euthanized, they light a candle in the waiting room with a sign saying something like this: "Someone is saying goodbye to their pet for their last time. Please keep noise to a minimum while they say their final good-byes." I thought it was a wonderful idea and suggested it to my vet who started doing the same thing. It's bad enough when we have to euthanize our beloved pet but to hear people in the waiting room laughing or talking loudly just makes it even more difficult.

Last edited by chiluvr1228; 09-15-2018 at 05:54 AM..
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,756 posts, read 4,169,753 times
Reputation: 15485
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
My half brother is a vet tech in a neighboring town. When an animal has to be euthanized, they light a candle in the waiting room with a sign saying something like this: "Someone is saying goodbye to their pet for their last time. Please keep noise to a minimum" while they say their final good-byes." I thought it was a wonderful idea and suggested it to my vet who started doing the same thing. It's bad enough when we have to euthanize our beloved pet but to hear people in the waiting room laughing or talking loudly just makes it even more difficult.
Another kind alternative: Our vet does euthanasia at the end of the day when no one else is coming in with their animals.
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:57 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,287 posts, read 4,865,859 times
Reputation: 21683
Unfortunately both times when I had to euthanize my Chihuahuas I woke up in the morning to the realization that they were not going to make it. Maggie was having seizures and a grade 4 heart murmur and had to PTS in May of 2016, Abby was just very old and her organs were failing and she was PTS in August of 2016. I couldn't bear to keep them going till the end of the day. I wish more vets would come to your home to euthanize our beloved pets. I always wonder if they know when they are going in the car that they are going to the vet and that it is their last trip. That's about the only time mine ever went in the car. :-(
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Old 09-15-2018, 06:18 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,518 times
Reputation: 20
I took my 15 year old cat to vet and thought he had infection in gums/tooth but instead got the news that he had brain tumor and mass in stomach and was suffering. I was hysterical and in shock. She recommended I have him put down and would only let me say goodbye but not let me stay. I left and was so upset I left carrier behind. Biggest regret because it's been over a year and I keep thinking he was alone and looking for me. I wish I had done things differently.
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Old 09-15-2018, 06:32 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,287 posts, read 4,865,859 times
Reputation: 21683
I would send a strongly worded letter to that vet especially if they are working in a clinic and aren't the boss.
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Old 09-15-2018, 07:48 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,735 posts, read 9,027,441 times
Reputation: 11107
There's no way I wouldn't be around if I had a pet put down. You have to say goodbye.
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Lone Star State to Peach State
3,828 posts, read 3,513,483 times
Reputation: 6928
Had to put my 13 yr old schnauzer mix to sleep.
Seizures in his last month were too violent with no relief.
He was a very noble, no nonsense, stoic old boy.
I could tell he didn't like losing control.
It's almost as if he felt embarrassed afterwards.
He would climb into the guest room bath tub to be away from us.
We took him in aND watched him drift away.
DaMN now I'm crying.
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