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Old 01-17-2019, 04:39 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 323,050 times
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I am not saying it's wise for an older person to adopt a kitten or puppy, but circumstances vary and I doubt adoption agencies take certain things into consideration. Some people live a lot longer than others. Some large breed dogs have short life spans. Some people die unexpectedly young. Everything can not be determined. The agencies have the right to set the criteria for their animals. My sister's will provides for the care of her dog. Some people think that's nuts. I think it is a good thing.
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Old 01-17-2019, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Tulare County, Ca
1,158 posts, read 712,078 times
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For those of you who have made provisions for your pets in your will, would you mind sharing some specifics on it? I'm wanting to do that too, but don't exactly know how to set it up. Are you leaving money to a trusted person to care for your loved one, or to an organization of some kind?
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Old 01-18-2019, 02:59 AM
 
Location: Here and now.
11,917 posts, read 3,568,678 times
Reputation: 12844
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
As a lifelong cat owner and now a dog owner, I agree that we do have to be sensible when adopting an animal. Probably a 79 yr old person shouldn't be getting a kitten, but I think they could have a grown cat. Not necessarily a senior cat who will have expensive medical issues, just a cat that is not still a kitten. Maybe one of those fully grown cats that gets returned because it's not a cute little kitten anymore.

I noticed the locations of the posters who had a really hard time adopting a pet. They were mostly here in New England. I had such a hard time (impossible time) getting a dog that I've had to get my last two on Craigs List. Yet I'm in touch online with someone in a southern state who rescues animals all the time, doesn't get them spayed or neutered, and lets them run wild outside...they can't even find homes for pets down there.

And a relative who lives in a southern state has a puppy mill right next door to her! Seems that maybe the shelters are too strict in the NE and not strict enough in the south. A generalization, but that's how I see it.
There are rescues in the south that focus almost entirely on sending dogs to northern locations, and some seem very reluctant to offer them to anyone local. They usually have very high adoption fees. It seems to be a supply and demand thing, but I'm not sure what I think of it. That seems to me a bit like treating the animals as a commodity, especially if a good home could be found nearby.
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Old 01-18-2019, 03:11 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,658 posts, read 4,098,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Your story reminds me of a cat that I adopted from a lady who runs her own feline rescue outfit. Some years back, she put an ad in the paper that she had kittens available. I have enjoyed the company of cats all my life, but at that time, my beloved cat, "Traveler" had moved on to that big catnip patch in the sky, and I'd been without a feline friend for maybe 6 months.

I was longing for another kitten in my life, so I gave her a call and she gave me the third degree, including asking if I declawed my cats. I told her that I opposed declawing because it left the cat unable to defend itself. That was the right answer and I was allowed to come by and be paired with the felid the cat lady thought was the best match for me. She presented me with a lovely tortoise shell that was a feral rescue.

When I got home, I released the feral tortie into a room that I had carefully prepared with a luxurious cat bed, litter box, food, water, toys - the works! My new wild cat was not impressed, and when I let her go, she promptly vanished into a closet and was gone. For two months my kitten hid at the far back of the closet and I only knew she was still around because she ate the food and used her box.

The Cat Lady would check on our progress every week or so, and I would sadly inform her that my wild child was still wild. After 6 weeks the Cat Lady told me that I could swap the feral tortie for a tamer kitten, but I had a feeling and I told her "not yet." At the two month mark, I woke up one night to discover my elusive kitten sound asleep on my chest. I still have her to this very day and she turned out to be one of the sweetest cats I've ever had!
What an awesome story and good for you for sticking it out with her! I love hearing these happy endings
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Old 01-18-2019, 03:19 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,658 posts, read 4,098,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Why would anyone pay so much money for a dog or cat at a shelter, when there are many being offered free by private individuals? The shelters even try to force you to have them sexually mutilated-------you have to pay for it, even if you don't have it done. I've never had to go looking for a cat. They always come to my place on their own and adopt me. They are better suited to decide where and with who they will live, than anyone at an animal shelter.

Sexually mutilated
? What a ridiculous comment! Altering an animal so it can't get pregnant and produce more unwanted animals only makes sense. I suppose you think it's ridiculous to have a vasectomy to prevent YOU from making unwanted babies?

Speaking of shelters, go walk through one in the spring after all the litters are born and you might see the reasoning behind altering them. Litters and litters of kittens and puppies coming through the doors daily, who only stand a slim chance of being placed into a good, responsible, loving home. I've seen it. I worked at a shelter when I was younger.

Some people should be altered from propagating.
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Old 01-18-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,154 posts, read 554,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janellen View Post
For those of you who have made provisions for your pets in your will, would you mind sharing some specifics on it? I'm wanting to do that too, but don't exactly know how to set it up. Are you leaving money to a trusted person to care for your loved one, or to an organization of some kind?
I have one daughter, so she gets all of my assets and she has agreed to care for my two dogs for the rest of their lives. I would care for both of hers if anything happened to her and her husband. If my daughter and I were to both pass....say we were in a car accident together.....my will provides a significant sum of money to my son-in-law, who has agreed to take my dogs, with the rest of my assets going to charity. I have, however, allowed an "out" for my SIL, since this situation would result in his having 4 dogs (my 2 and their 2). He would keep my older dog for the rest of her life, because she is less adoptable, but would have the option of returning the younger dog to his rescue organization with a sum of money to be given to his adopter for his care. It is good to ask a person now if they would be willing to keep your pets should something happen. I have 100 percent trust in my daughter, so I am fortunate to have that person who I know would provide good care and love to them.
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Old 01-18-2019, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,154 posts, read 554,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catgirl64 View Post
There are rescues in the south that focus almost entirely on sending dogs to northern locations, and some seem very reluctant to offer them to anyone local. They usually have very high adoption fees. It seems to be a supply and demand thing, but I'm not sure what I think of it. That seems to me a bit like treating the animals as a commodity, especially if a good home could be found nearby.
There are not enough good homes nearby. Northern states have stricter laws and, thus, a smaller "unwanted" pet population. There are fewer backyard breeders in northern states due to stricter spay and neutering laws and higher licensing fees for un-neutered animals. In the south, we do not do a good job of legislating in this area, so our unwanted population is larger and that is why dogs are sent north. It is not inexpensive to take a dog from a kill shelter through rescue to adoption and the fees are justifiable. Further, if you don't have the money to pay an adoption fee, how do you plan to provide proper medical care? Veterinary costs are high.
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Old 01-18-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Here and now.
11,917 posts, read 3,568,678 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
There are not enough good homes nearby. Northern states have stricter laws and, thus, a smaller "unwanted" pet population. There are fewer backyard breeders in northern states due to stricter spay and neutering laws and higher licensing fees for un-neutered animals. In the south, we do not do a good job of legislating in this area, so our unwanted population is larger and that is why dogs are sent north. It is not inexpensive to take a dog from a kill shelter through rescue to adoption and the fees are justifiable. Further, if you don't have the money to pay an adoption fee, how do you plan to provide proper medical care? Veterinary costs are high.
I'm aware of the reasons behind this phenomenon, and of the costs associated with rescue work. I grew up in Missouri, which is pretty much puppy mill central. My point is that it costs money to transport these animals, at least in some cases (I know that sometimes volunteers transport them), and that cost could be deducted from the adoption fee for an appropriate local home, should one be found. The rescue I am thinking of (I've forgotten the name) doesn't even publicize the availability of these animals except in targeted northern states, leaving no alternative to having them shipped or driven to either their adoptive family or another rescue. There are good homes to be found here, so why not start locally, then expand the search?
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Old 01-18-2019, 04:49 PM
 
6,541 posts, read 3,679,910 times
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Originally Posted by LynnBBQ View Post
(snip)
I'm glad that they are selective and do their best to keep pets out of abusive homes. But I wonder how many potential good owners are turned off by the invasive background check?
If they're turned off, maybe they wouldn't be good pet owners.

When I adopted my cocker spaniel years ago, they came to my house to see the living conditions, whether I had a fenced yard, probably see if I was really poor or wealthy by my house, had me fill out a questionnaire, called my vet to verify that I had taken proper care of my prior pet. I thought it was a bit much, but I understood why. Sometimes people get a dog without a fenced yard, or don't have the funds to pay for medical care, or have a yard full of pit bulls, or whatever.
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Old 01-18-2019, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
34,949 posts, read 10,302,414 times
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Of course they have a right to--but don't get me started on how they wouldn't let a local, rural family adopt a 12-year old cat intended to be a mouser in their barn (yes, the cat, who would've thought she died and went to heaven, was later euthanized). That brought a lot of negative publicity for the "animal welfare" folks.

Or how, when DH and I were looking for a cat, we came across "Harry," a shy 14-year-old at one of the Humane Society's "satellite" offices. An elderly gentleman heard us ask about him, and said that the "adoption counselor" wouldn't let anyone see him because he'd just gotten there. When I asked, she said he had to "settle in," first.

I got right on the horn at home, and asked to speak with the director, who said, "Whaat?"...and added that, when the cats and dogs arrive at these points of adoption, they're ready. Meanwhile, poor Harry lost out on two possible owners who didn't care that he was shy or old.

Just because people work or volunteer at an animal welfare agency doesn't always mean that they make the best decisions for the animals.
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