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Old 01-11-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,344 posts, read 13,980,723 times
Reputation: 4265

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
There are many nabes with trollys today and no Gen Y folks. I mostly agree with Roto; notsure they are the top priority
Philly is behind with TOD in General and the zoning is preventing , change the zone and developers will swoop in and transform just about every corridor. Same goes for the Philly Metro , zoning is preventing TOD. NJ has been lucky enough to have smart growth policies in place since the late 80s , starting with the Suburbs and now just getting to Urban Jersey.
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Old 01-11-2012, 01:49 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,783 posts, read 2,290,193 times
Reputation: 1583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Philly is behind with TOD in General and the zoning is preventing , change the zone and developers will swoop in and transform just about every corridor. Same goes for the Philly Metro , zoning is preventing TOD. NJ has been lucky enough to have smart growth policies in place since the late 80s , starting with the Suburbs and now just getting to Urban Jersey.
I don't think that a truism like "Gen Y loves trolleys!" is going to fly as part of a legitimate TOD plan. Real money is involved here, and transit lines already exist. TOD plans prioritize transit, but not exclusively rail.
This is not a zoning issue. Someone will need to demonstrate that a trolley is both feasible and more efficient than an existing bus route. On many of those streets, I don't think that it is.
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Old 01-18-2012, 09:57 AM
 
Location: The City
19,357 posts, read 16,700,140 times
Reputation: 5787




Aquinas Realty plans to build a 12-story apartment building with ground floor retail at 2017-23 Chestnut Street, where the four-story YWCA Annex building now stands.



Aquinas hopes to build a 12-story apartment building at the former YWCA annex on Chestnut Street | PlanPhilly: Planning Philadelphia's Future
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Old 01-28-2012, 10:38 AM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,344 posts, read 13,980,723 times
Reputation: 4265
Railway Age - January 2012

Looks like Septa is getting ready to purchase 141 LRT cars , i guess that signals the restoration of the 23 & 56 Trolleys , and Waterfront network...for DPRA...
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Old 01-28-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: DC Suburbs of Maryland (by way of PA)
2,976 posts, read 4,238,215 times
Reputation: 2281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Railway Age - January 2012

Looks like Septa is getting ready to purchase 141 LRT cars , i guess that signals the restoration of the 23 & 56 Trolleys , and Waterfront network...for DPRA...
Interesting find. However, I think SEPTA should prioritize restoration of existing stations, as many are just downright decrepit (i.e., City Hall).

Hopefully more state/federal funding will start to loosen up in regards to public transportation very soon.
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Old 01-28-2012, 11:26 AM
 
Location: The City
19,357 posts, read 16,700,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Interesting find. However, I think SEPTA should prioritize restoration of existing stations, as many are just downright decrepit (i.e., City Hall).

Hopefully more state/federal funding will start to loosen up in regards to public transportation very soon.

Am pretty sure city hall is being redone, or at least parts of it with the Dilworth Plaza redo


Actually maybe not, this from yesterday just new elevators
Dilworth Plaza | PlanPhilly: Planning Philadelphia's Future
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Old 01-28-2012, 12:16 PM
 
Location: The City
19,357 posts, read 16,700,140 times
Reputation: 5787
Philly Shark: Philadelphia Region Forecast to Expect Healthy Population Growth
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Old 01-28-2012, 02:20 PM
 
Location: DC Suburbs of Maryland (by way of PA)
2,976 posts, read 4,238,215 times
Reputation: 2281
I think even these estimates might be a little conservative. From 2000-2040, the region grew about 5%. Although growth has likely slowed a little from a weakened economy, I think things will begin to pick up again relatively soon. A 15% growth rate to 2040 would not be out of the question.

We can especially expect more "priced-out" NY and DC area expatriates given the pricing trends in those areas.
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Old 01-28-2012, 04:32 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,783 posts, read 2,290,193 times
Reputation: 1583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I think even these estimates might be a little conservative. From 2000-2040, the region grew about 5%. Although growth has likely slowed a little from a weakened economy, I think things will begin to pick up again relatively soon. A 15% growth rate to 2040 would not be out of the question.

We can especially expect more "priced-out" NY and DC area expatriates given the pricing trends in those areas.
The big issue is that the job market in Philly will need to keep up with that hypothetical demand if it's going to be an attractive option for people in DC or NYC who hope to relocate. Professionally mobile people (ie the type that Philly would like to attract) are largely in NYC and DC for work/career reasons, not because they love the rents.
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Old 01-28-2012, 04:47 PM
 
Location: DC Suburbs of Maryland (by way of PA)
2,976 posts, read 4,238,215 times
Reputation: 2281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Philly is behind with TOD in General and the zoning is preventing , change the zone and developers will swoop in and transform just about every corridor. Same goes for the Philly Metro , zoning is preventing TOD. NJ has been lucky enough to have smart growth policies in place since the late 80s , starting with the Suburbs and now just getting to Urban Jersey.
That's not true at all. In fact, Southeastern PA has stronger zoning/Smart Growth policies than much of New Jersey.

There are plenty of areas in Philly 'burbs that are encouraging TOD development -- places like Ardmore, Conshohocken, Downingtown, Newtown, Wayne, Paoli, Malvern, numerous areas of Philly.

Are there NIMBYs that impede development? Unfortunately, but you can find that in many areas. Could it be further along? Absolutely, but the next cycle of development will definitely focus a lot greater proportion of development in urban centers/developed suburbs with existing public transportation infrastructure.

Last edited by Duderino; 01-28-2012 at 05:05 PM..
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