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Old 03-01-2012, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Bridesburg
99 posts, read 74,737 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphamale View Post
Yay!

Here's the racial breakdown....

White.....1
Asian.....0
Hispanic..2
Black......53

Does something seem weird here?
Only one white has been murdered in Philly this year?

 
Old 03-01-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Bridesburg
99 posts, read 74,737 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtom605 View Post
You can keep the ghetto from creeping up by not leaving the neighborhood. If there is a mass exodus in the coming years from areas like Mayfair, Castor Gardens, Holmesburg, Rhawnhurst, etc, then those areas will become the next Frankford, Oxford Circle, and Summerdale.













That's a nice thought, but people put houses up for sale for a variety of reasons. People die. People get divorced and go their separate ways. People need a larger house. People want private parking. People buy a house as a "starter" with plans on eventually moving to the suburbs. People lose their job and can no longer afford the house. People get transferred for work. People want better schools. People want a better area with nicer people.
These are all legitimate reasons people put a house up for sale ... The problem I'm seeing in Bridesburg is the old people are dying and leaving a house that needs to to be completely remodeled and investors are swooping in and turning them into rentals. Not Section 8, thank God, but it's bad enough. Young people nowadays don't seem to wanna buy a cheap house and fix it up as they go along, like the previous generations did. Everybody wants something pretty.
Holmesburg, Mayfair, Tacony and Wissinoming have BIG problems ... I know there are good people fighting the good fight, but I see no hope for these neighborhoods, they are "changing" and not for the better. The working class white people aren't going to be able to handle the lower class minorities, it's the same story that's been repeated thousands of times in America. And don't think there aren't problems in the Far NE ... the Far NE is loaded with dirtbag apartment buildings.
 
Old 03-01-2012, 04:30 PM
 
Location: West Cedar Park, Philadelphia
1,225 posts, read 1,213,522 times
Reputation: 668
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Burger View Post
That's a nice thought, but people put houses up for sale for a variety of reasons. People die. People get divorced and go their separate ways. People need a larger house. People want private parking. People buy a house as a "starter" with plans on eventually moving to the suburbs. People lose their job and can no longer afford the house. People get transferred for work. People want better schools. People want a better area with nicer people.
These are all legitimate reasons people put a house up for sale ... The problem I'm seeing in Bridesburg is the old people are dying and leaving a house that needs to to be completely remodeled and investors are swooping in and turning them into rentals. Not Section 8, thank God, but it's bad enough. Young people nowadays don't seem to wanna buy a cheap house and fix it up as they go along, like the previous generations did. Everybody wants something pretty.
Holmesburg, Mayfair, Tacony and Wissinoming have BIG problems ... I know there are good people fighting the good fight, but I see no hope for these neighborhoods, they are "changing" and not for the better. The working class white people aren't going to be able to handle the lower class minorities, it's the same story that's been repeated thousands of times in America. And don't think there aren't problems in the Far NE ... the Far NE is loaded with dirtbag apartment buildings.
And here I have to comment on why we need to keep having new houses? Every generation can't have a whole new set of suburban tract houses built for it. The housing crash ought to have been a lesson to us. Why aren't we learning? Make more with what you have. The houses in the NE are perfectly good even if they need updating, but that's part of the pride of homeownership is putting your own sweat equity into your house. In fact the craftsmanship that went into the houses in the NE is far better than most of this new suburban crap they're building now anyways. Why do we keep having to abandon our neighborhoods in favor of something new? We don't have the resources to keep being wasteful like this. Look at the destruction it's left behind. Go to any other industrialized country and they just don't behave this way. Nobody abandons, wholesale, entire cities like Americans will just because some snake oil salesman is willing to sell them the American Dream at 3,000-3,500sqft on a mortgage they honestly couldn't afford. We have sold out our neighborhoods because of this and its a shame. I'm just thankful that not every neighborhood was destroyed this way and that enough people still care to save some of them. Where I am whole tracts of architecturally significant homes have been saved because people actually care about their older neighborhoods, and take pride in having an older home that they put their work into fixing up. I like to think that hopefully, ultimately maybe people will stick around if we can fix some of the other problems the city has, but then which comes first? If good people leave because of the problems, you have less good people to counteract those same issues.
 
Old 03-01-2012, 06:39 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,789 posts, read 9,737,045 times
Reputation: 2122
good observations Mr. Burger.. Very true


Quote:
Originally Posted by The Burger View Post
That's a nice thought, but people put houses up for sale for a variety of reasons. People die. People get divorced and go their separate ways. People need a larger house. People want private parking. People buy a house as a "starter" with plans on eventually moving to the suburbs. People lose their job and can no longer afford the house. People get transferred for work. People want better schools. People want a better area with nicer people.
These are all legitimate reasons people put a house up for sale ... The problem I'm seeing in Bridesburg is the old people are dying and leaving a house that needs to to be completely remodeled and investors are swooping in and turning them into rentals. Not Section 8, thank God, but it's bad enough. Young people nowadays don't seem to wanna buy a cheap house and fix it up as they go along, like the previous generations did. Everybody wants something pretty.
Holmesburg, Mayfair, Tacony and Wissinoming have BIG problems ... I know there are good people fighting the good fight, but I see no hope for these neighborhoods, they are "changing" and not for the better. The working class white people aren't going to be able to handle the lower class minorities, it's the same story that's been repeated thousands of times in America. And don't think there aren't problems in the Far NE ... the Far NE is loaded with dirtbag apartment buildings.
 
Old 03-01-2012, 06:44 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,789 posts, read 9,737,045 times
Reputation: 2122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marius Pontmercy View Post
An Make more with what you have. The houses in the NE are perfectly good even if they need updating, but that's part of the pride of homeownership is putting your own sweat equity into your house. In fact the craftsmanship that went into the houses in the NE is far better than most of this new suburban crap they're building now anyways. .
Whats make you think every home in the burbs is new? It's simply is not true. Id say 90% of the homes in the burbs are 50 years old or older.. And I can tell you with 100% truth from a construction engineer background that my home in the burbs now is built way better then the airlight row home we had in the city. Not even close. That home had newspaper in the walls for insulation.
 
Old 03-01-2012, 08:12 PM
 
Location: West Cedar Park, Philadelphia
1,225 posts, read 1,213,522 times
Reputation: 668
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankgn87 View Post
Whats make you think every home in the burbs is new? It's simply is not true. Id say 90% of the homes in the burbs are 50 years old or older.. And I can tell you with 100% truth from a construction engineer background that my home in the burbs now is built way better then the airlight row home we had in the city. Not even close. That home had newspaper in the walls for insulation.
Most of the older homes in the "burbs" are in neighborhoods pretty similar to the ones in the NE. The NE itself is pretty suburban in character anyway. I just find it ridiculous that we abandon perfectly good neighborhoods to build brand new ones when we could re purpose the older ones. We'd be more efficient and we wouldn't let our cities go to pot the way we have.

Also there's many differences in construction between say a 20s rowhome, a 50s rowhome, and a 90s detached in terms of construction methods and materials. Almost all your older Philly homes are made with superior materials (old growth lumber, masonry, stone) than newer homes (young growth stick construction). Generally newer homes are better insulated to reduce heating costs. Newer homes are larger and don't share party walls, making them more expensive to heat, necessitating better insulation. Philly homes generally aren't insulated as well because at the time climate controlled homes didn't really exist, and they made up for this with the type of materials and kind of construction which has some heat saving characteristics (low percentage of exterior walls per unit, shared party walls and thicker walls). I wouldn't say newer homes are engineered better, just differently because the new houses have different sorts of problems than older ones did, and the design has adapted to best mitigate those problems. I still don't think you can beat the craftsmanship that went into some Philly homes, especially when you compare it to a crop of McMansions that was built as cheaply as possible to maximize profit for a developer. Not that there aren't rowhouses in Philly built the same way, just that I don't think there's any substitute for a good old house. You can't beat old growth timber and solid stone and masonry for staying power. A good Philly home will be around for centuries if its taken care of.
 
Old 03-01-2012, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista
2,199 posts, read 1,571,171 times
Reputation: 1817
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankgn87 View Post
Whats make you think every home in the burbs is new? It's simply is not true. Id say 90% of the homes in the burbs are 50 years old or older.. And I can tell you with 100% truth from a construction engineer background that my home in the burbs now is built way better then the airlight row home we had in the city. Not even close. That home had newspaper in the walls for insulation.

New homes are more air tight. They are built "better", but the end result is still severely lacking compared to much older homes due to the materials used to build them. The same hyper-manufactured poly materials that make new houses so much more air tight than old houses is also the same reason that none of them are going to last a century without extensive upkeep.

The place I live in right now is drafty as hell, but it's been standing here for 130 years and it'll going on standing here for a couple hundred more years just as long as the roof is maintained.

We have vastly improved techniques so that houses go up now quicker, sealed tighter, and more energy efficient than ever before. That is a good thing. We have also figured out how to make them cheaper... and that's good in a sense... but not in others. Many houses today are just not built for the long haul. look at the cheap pressed boards used to build houses today and compare them to the massive solid pieces of lumber used in the past. You keep an old house dry and it will last for centuries.. a newer house just isn't built with that type of time frame in mind.

Besides you are speaking only from construction engineer's point of view. There are more ways than that to judge the quality of a homes construction. The house I live in is a former mansion, unfortunately in it's 1970s conversion into 5 apartments much of the original details on the first two floors were lost. There is a beautiful bookshelf preserved in my apartment along with the hardwood floor. Everything else though from the molding to the fireplaces to even the plaster walls were torn out and replaced with modern materials in the 70s to make the conversion easier.

However the third floor has basically been entirely preserved as it once looked with the only change being the conversion of one bedroom into the kitchen. I've seen my neighbors apartment a few times and it's amazing. There were once 7 fireplaces in this building but today only the two on the third floor remain. The amount of detail in these stone fireplaces is nothing short of amazing. The molding is so ornate and detailed. Simple things like the banisters are just beautiful.

The amount of time, effort and genuine skill that used to go into building a home is dumbfounding in an age when houses are mass produced as though they are any other object on an assembly line. My house took almost two years to build, a couple of blocks away from me there is a development of thirty houses that will be completed within 6 months. They're going to be beautiful modern homes in a great neighborhood right next to the italian market! I'd love to live in one of them... but at the same time nothing in them will be unique or original. More time and thought probably went into carving the stone fire place that sits in the apartment above me than was spent on that entire development of 30 houses.

Whether you live in a new house or an old house there are benefits of both. Aesthetically speaking though it's no contest.

Last edited by phillies2011; 03-01-2012 at 09:49 PM..
 
Old 03-02-2012, 04:32 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,789 posts, read 9,737,045 times
Reputation: 2122
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillies2011 View Post
New homes are more air tight. They are built "better", but the end result is still severely lacking compared to much older homes due to the materials used to build them. The same hyper-manufactured poly materials that make new houses so much more air tight than old houses is also the same reason that none of them are going to last a century without extensive upkeep.

The place I live in right now is drafty as hell, but it's been standing here for 130 years and it'll going on standing here for a couple hundred more years just as long as the roof is maintained.

We have vastly improved techniques so that houses go up now quicker, sealed tighter, and more energy efficient than ever before. That is a good thing. We have also figured out how to make them cheaper... and that's good in a sense... but not in others. Many houses today are just not built for the long haul. look at the cheap pressed boards used to build houses today and compare them to the massive solid pieces of lumber used in the past. You keep an old house dry and it will last for centuries.. a newer house just isn't built with that type of time frame in mind.

Besides you are speaking only from construction engineer's point of view. There are more ways than that to judge the quality of a homes construction. The house I live in is a former mansion, unfortunately in it's 1970s conversion into 5 apartments much of the original details on the first two floors were lost. There is a beautiful bookshelf preserved in my apartment along with the hardwood floor. Everything else though from the molding to the fireplaces to even the plaster walls were torn out and replaced with modern materials in the 70s to make the conversion easier.

However the third floor has basically been entirely preserved as it once looked with the only change being the conversion of one bedroom into the kitchen. I've seen my neighbors apartment a few times and it's amazing. There were once 7 fireplaces in this building but today only the two on the third floor remain. The amount of detail in these stone fireplaces is nothing short of amazing. The molding is so ornate and detailed. Simple things like the banisters are just beautiful.

The amount of time, effort and genuine skill that used to go into building a home is dumbfounding in an age when houses are mass produced as though they are any other object on an assembly line. My house took almost two years to build, a couple of blocks away from me there is a development of thirty houses that will be completed within 6 months. They're going to be beautiful modern homes in a great neighborhood right next to the italian market! I'd love to live in one of them... but at the same time nothing in them will be unique or original. More time and thought probably went into carving the stone fire place that sits in the apartment above me than was spent on that entire development of 30 houses.

Whether you live in a new house or an old house there are benefits of both. Aesthetically speaking though it's no contest.
I agree.. BTW my home is 52 years old.. Built with Douglass fir (not pine)lumber with read 2x4's and real 8" main beams and was gutted down to the studs and re insulated with the best insulation of today and re walled with new drywall, new 40 year roof and new Pella windows.. Has the best of both worlds..
 
Old 03-03-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Bridesburg
99 posts, read 74,737 times
Reputation: 36
Finally, a normal priest:


Priest charged with patronizing a prostitute
 
Old 03-03-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,789 posts, read 9,737,045 times
Reputation: 2122
dressing up in your priest outfit & trolling again, burger?
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