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Old 03-21-2012, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ area
5,419 posts, read 2,985,755 times
Reputation: 2836
Default Should Philly follow the same path of Atlanta and demolish all of its Housing Projects to help decrease the crime rate?

In 2009 Atlanta became the 1st major U.S. city to eliminate all of its housing projects as way to decrease high crime rates and poverty. Since 2001 violent crime has dropped 50% in Atlanta and the homicide rate has dropped by 57%.

End near for Atlanta housing projects - US news - Life - msnbc.com

Crime in Atlanta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

My question to all of you is "Do you think Philadelphia should follow in the same footsteps as Atlanta and make serious efforts to eliminating all of its housing projects?" Do you think that would decrease the homicide rate and poverty for the City of Philadelphia in the long run?
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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Philadelphia has already been doing this...... Atlanta's a little late to this game. This was already done in South Philly and is currently being done in North Philly right next to Temple. I don't know why the article says Atlanta is the first to do this.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ area
5,419 posts, read 2,985,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Summersm343 View Post
Philadelphia has already been doing this...... Atlanta's a little late to this game. This was already done in South Philly and is currently being done in North Philly right next to Temple. I don't know why the article says Atlanta is the first to do this.
Atlanta was the 1st major city to the US to demolish all of its housing projects. Atlanta no longer has housing projects in its city limits. That's the big difference.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Atlanta was the 1st major city to the US to demolish all of its housing projects. Atlanta no longer has housing projects in its city limits.
Oh gotcha. Well Philadelphia is demolishing it's housing projects, so I guess your question is answered. Will it decrease crime? Hell yeah it will. You are a product of your environment. People who have nicer things tend to commit less crimes. Will it decrease poverty? No. We need better education and opportunity for the young to eliminate future poverty. There needs to be more initiatives and rewards for those who go to a trade school or charter school. There needs to be better opportunities for low income kids attending bad public schools but still get good grades and do well on state tests etc etc.
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
133 posts, read 104,090 times
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I have mixed feelings on this issue. On one hand, removing the housing projects from the city will certainly improve the safety of the neighborhood surrounding the projects. On the other hand, every action has an equal and opposite reaction. If the housing projects are removed, will there be a significant increase in the homeless population and/or section 8 properties?

Of course, getting rid of the housing projects could speed up the process of gentrification in the areas close to Center City. While most everyone on this board seems to like the gentrification happening in certain sections of North Philly, West Philly, and Kensington, I have a few reasons to worry about it. As a resident of Northeast Philly, I'm worried that the people who made those areas crime-filled ghettos will be pushed out into the Northeast (which has already happened to an extent).

What people need to understand is that the city will never be perfect in our lifetimes. There will never be a time when all sections of Philadelphia are nice and safe. I just hope that the city doesn't purposely push the ghetto out to Northeast Philly in order to attract yuppies and impress tourists.
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:41 PM
 
Location: southern california
47,991 posts, read 43,504,164 times
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no demolish section 8 and sell those units off as condos.
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
5,871 posts, read 3,938,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtom605 View Post
I have mixed feelings on this issue. On one hand, removing the housing projects from the city will certainly improve the safety of the neighborhood surrounding the projects. On the other hand, every action has an equal and opposite reaction. If the housing projects are removed, will there be a significant increase in the homeless population and/or section 8 properties?

Of course, getting rid of the housing projects could speed up the process of gentrification in the areas close to Center City. While most everyone on this board seems to like the gentrification happening in certain sections of North Philly, West Philly, and Kensington, I have a few reasons to worry about it. As a resident of Northeast Philly, I'm worried that the people who made those areas crime-filled ghettos will be pushed out into the Northeast (which has already happened to an extent).

What people need to understand is that the city will never be perfect in our lifetimes. There will never be a time when all sections of Philadelphia are nice and safe. I just hope that the city doesn't purposely push the ghetto out to Northeast Philly in order to attract yuppies and impress tourists.
The Northeast will not be taken over as long as there is a strong resistance there like we are seeing in Mayfair. I think most of the poor will be priced out of the city in due time. It's a messed up thing to say but it is true. Philly is growing along with the entire Northeast. Most of the poor will move to Camden and Chester and Wilmington... then they will be priced out of the area and move elsewhere. I don't think the Northeast will become worse off then what it is now as long as everyone living in the Northeast doesn't pack up and living. I see Upper North Philadelphia, Southwest Philadelphia and Logan/Olney/Fern Rock and the Southern fringe neighborhoods of the Northeast will remain ghettos for some time. But think... the crime and ghettos tried pushing into the Northwest but didnt get very far. Areas of the Northwest that are ghetto are now being gentrified and gentrification is pushing back. This is very evident in Germantown. There is still hope and a saving grace for the Northeast... it is not over yet.
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Old 03-21-2012, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
133 posts, read 104,090 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Summersm343 View Post
The Northeast will not be taken over as long as there is a strong resistance there like we are seeing in Mayfair. I think most of the poor will be priced out of the city in due time. It's a messed up thing to say but it is true. Philly is growing along with the entire Northeast. Most of the poor will move to Camden and Chester and Wilmington... then they will be priced out of the area and move elsewhere. I don't think the Northeast will become worse off then what it is now as long as everyone living in the Northeast doesn't pack up and living. I see Upper North Philadelphia, Southwest Philadelphia and Logan/Olney/Fern Rock and the Southern fringe neighborhoods of the Northeast will remain ghettos for some time. But think... the crime and ghettos tried pushing into the Northwest but didnt get very far. Areas of the Northwest that are ghetto are now being gentrified and gentrification is pushing back. This is very evident in Germantown. There is still hope and a saving grace for the Northeast... it is not over yet.
You're right, but not every neighborhood has the same amount of pride as Mayfair. My fear is that, in many of the other neighborhoods, people will just pack up and leave. Before the recession, that's exactly what was happening. I'm talking several for-sale signs per block. Then, once the recession hit in 2008, it all came to a halt. Perhaps people have realized that they can't afford big houses in the expensive suburbs and are just content to stay. Also, they may be more suspicious of realtors and banks who tell them that they can afford a home priced at X amount of dollars.

Although, with the economy apparently on the way back up, I have seen a recent uptick in for-sale signs. Not as many as before, but more than at anytime since 2008.

As far as the Northwest is concerned, I was in the area around Germantown High School recently and it didn't look too good. Plenty of boarded up and crumbling properties, but maybe I wasn't looking in the right spot. That said, some of the houses were huge and beautiful, unlike most in the Northeast.

I don't want the NE to decline (I live in the lower NE myself). And I also don't think it's inevitable. Perhaps 20-30 years ago, whites would simply leave a neighborhood when blacks and other minorities starting moving in, but it's not the same anymore. I'm white myself, but I've found that, if you take care of your property and your kids aren't running amok all day, then you'll generally be welcomed into the neighborhood.
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Old 03-21-2012, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
5,871 posts, read 3,938,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtom605 View Post
You're right, but not every neighborhood has the same amount of pride as Mayfair. My fear is that, in many of the other neighborhoods, people will just pack up and leave. Before the recession, that's exactly what was happening. I'm talking several for-sale signs per block. Then, once the recession hit in 2008, it all came to a halt. Perhaps people have realized that they can't afford big houses in the expensive suburbs and are just content to stay. Also, they may be more suspicious of realtors and banks who tell them that they can afford a home priced at X amount of dollars.

Although, with the economy apparently on the way back up, I have seen a recent uptick in for-sale signs. Not as many as before, but more than at anytime since 2008.

As far as the Northwest is concerned, I was in the area around Germantown High School recently and it didn't look too good. Plenty of boarded up and crumbling properties, but maybe I wasn't looking in the right spot. That said, some of the houses were huge and beautiful, unlike most in the Northeast.

I don't want the NE to decline (I live in the lower NE myself). And I also don't think it's inevitable. Perhaps 20-30 years ago, whites would simply leave a neighborhood when blacks and other minorities starting moving in, but it's not the same anymore. I'm white myself, but I've found that, if you take care of your property and your kids aren't running amok all day, then you'll generally be welcomed into the neighborhood.
Agreed... people are becoming more accepting. Germantown is JUST beginning the early stages of gentrification. There is a lot of interest in some big time developers in this area like Blatstein... who single-handedly redeveloped Northern Liberties and is currently heavily invested in the North Broad Corridor. Germantown has some bright days ahead of it... and development/gentrification will continue to push South and east into North Philadelphia as development from Center City and Lower North Philadelphia continues to push more North. Even development from East Falls is starting to slowly trickle into the Allegheny West neighborhood.
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Old 03-23-2012, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
925 posts, read 1,943,019 times
Reputation: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtom605 View Post
You're right, but not every neighborhood has the same amount of pride as Mayfair. My fear is that, in many of the other neighborhoods, people will just pack up and leave. Before the recession, that's exactly what was happening. I'm talking several for-sale signs per block. Then, once the recession hit in 2008, it all came to a halt. Perhaps people have realized that they can't afford big houses in the expensive suburbs and are just content to stay. Also, they may be more suspicious of realtors and banks who tell them that they can afford a home priced at X amount of dollars.

Although, with the economy apparently on the way back up, I have seen a recent uptick in for-sale signs. Not as many as before, but more than at anytime since 2008.

As far as the Northwest is concerned, I was in the area around Germantown High School recently and it didn't look too good. Plenty of boarded up and crumbling properties, but maybe I wasn't looking in the right spot. That said, some of the houses were huge and beautiful, unlike most in the Northeast.

I don't want the NE to decline (I live in the lower NE myself). And I also don't think it's inevitable. Perhaps 20-30 years ago, whites would simply leave a neighborhood when blacks and other minorities starting moving in, but it's not the same anymore. I'm white myself, but I've found that, if you take care of your property and your kids aren't running amok all day, then you'll generally be welcomed into the neighborhood.
Since the gas prices started to rise big time, a good number of those recent home owners that are contributing to the small uptick of sale signs on
many of their
blocks are not moving to the car oriented suburbs per se. They want to look into more walkable areas that they could afford and truth to be told ,those boring and bland looking brick airlite brick 2-story ,3 bedroom rowhouses on treeless streets built in the mid 20th century that are common in the lower Northeast Philly neighborhoods are not the most sought after when it comes to desirability. Alot of those folks that are moving are seeking other popular areas in the city such as many parts of South Philadelphia, Fishtown, Bridesburg, Port Richmond east of Aramingo Ave., the up and coming part of Kensington south of Lehigh Ave. and east of Front St., the Roxborough/Manayunk /Wissahickon area , East Falls, Fairmount and even the desirable increasingly family friendly University City -Clark Park area . The car oriented suburbs were the the destination in the 60s , 70s, 80s and even much of the 90s but that is no longer the case. I do not know if it the case for Philly ( I am originally from here but my job transferred me out to Ohio in '94) but it seems like that the neighborhoods where old school homes such as brownstones, Victorians, Italianates , American 4 Squares , Craftman s etc. predominate are becoming like the" cat's meow" and and areas where 50s, 60s and 70s style ranches, split levels, Cape Cods are seeing significant decline.
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