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Old 11-27-2018, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,055 posts, read 1,973,186 times
Reputation: 2557

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Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
I only made that distinction because Google Maps had the neighborhood of Cedarbrook shown on the map.
I live in the far SW, so it's all Mount Airy to me

Heck, I can't tell you how perturbed my friends or people I met from "up there" would be when I'd say dismissively: "Mt. Airy, Oak Lane, Germantown, whatever. It's all up there together." Honest to G-d, I was well into my 30s before I finally remembered which was where. A friend who lives in Mount Airy finally broke it down, and I cared enough to try to remember....basically she said, "Think east and west of Germantown Ave., and east and west of Broad. Mt Airy straddles Germantown. Oak Lane straddles Broad" Oh, OK I got it. I am however still working on differentiating Port Richmond, Bridesburg, and Frankford.

But I gather that folks in the far NE, don't know much about SW either. This from the person who is quick to ask people lumping all of SW together, "where do you mean in SW?, and point out that, "no, Eastwick IS NOT Kingsessing!!
Further distinction:

Stenton Avenue separates Germantown and Mt. Airy from West Oak Lane and "Cedarbrook".

Washington Lane separates Germantown from Mt. Airy, and Cresheim Creek separates Mt. Airy from Chestnut Hill. All three of these neighborhoods straddle Germantown Avenue, and each has an east and a west side, though you never hear people speak of "East Chestnut Hill" or "West Chestnut Hill" the way they speak of East and West Mt. Airy or East Germantown and Germantown (no West).

Port Richmond lies north of the former Reading Raliroad tracks leading to the Port Reading piers - that wide railroad right-of-way beneath which the junkies sleep - and stretches from Frankford and Torresdale avenues on the west to the Delaware on the east. Bridesburg lies above Port Richmond on the opposite side of Frankford Creek, which separates it from Port Richmond. The ex-Rohm and Haas (now Dow) chemical plant and I-95 separate it from Frankford, whose southern boundary is also Frankford Creek.

Frankford extends as far east as !-95. as far west as Roosevelt Boulevard, and north as far as Bridge Street. Above that on Frankford Avenue, you're in Wissinoming.
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Old 11-28-2018, 12:52 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,099 posts, read 26,308,271 times
Reputation: 8545
The weekly specials are labeled "surprises" in Lidl. When a store is going to open, they put aside an allotment for the store for a week or two. When the Delaware County store opens next week there will be more than just next week's allotment.
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Old 01-14-2019, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,055 posts, read 1,973,186 times
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German grocer Lidl months away from starting construction on the South Philly waterfront | The Philadelphia Inquirer | Philly.com
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Old 01-14-2019, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,055 posts, read 1,973,186 times
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Also, since it seems that the discussion of the ShopRite of Haverford (Avenue, Haddington)'s closing has vanished from this board:

I did read something recently that I think probably also contributed to Brown's decision to close the store:

An Aldi supermarket opened up recently not far from this ShopRite on the other side of the city line.

Aldi, as you know, has been on a tear of late, attracting not only those with limited budgets but more upscale shoppers.

That store would definitely eat into that ShopRite's customer base.
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:43 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,099 posts, read 26,308,271 times
Reputation: 8545
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Also, since it seems that the discussion of the ShopRite of Haverford (Avenue, Haddington)'s closing has vanished from this board:

I did read something recently that I think probably also contributed to Brown's decision to close the store:

An Aldi supermarket opened up recently not far from this ShopRite on the other side of the city line.

Aldi, as you know, has been on a tear of late, attracting not only those with limited budgets but more upscale shoppers.

That store would definitely eat into that ShopRite's customer base.
That sounds like the answer. Aldi has a goal to become the #3 grocery store in the US.
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:47 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,099 posts, read 26,308,271 times
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This is good news.
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Old 01-15-2019, 02:51 AM
 
6,408 posts, read 6,801,961 times
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1) I'd bet that store will do gangbuster business!

2) ALSO, just a quick question.....
What would you say are the differences between "Fresh Grocer" and "ShopRite?"
Given that they're sort of "sister" operations......if you had to differentiate them for someone who's not familiar what would you say about them? More limited selection? More international offerings? Different square footage? What? Why would. person pick one over the other?

Thanks

(This was prompted by MarketStEl's post about some Fresh Grocer and ShopRite in the Drexel Hill thread....but this thread is about supermarkets so I put it here so not to derail the other conversation.)

Last edited by selhars; 01-15-2019 at 03:06 AM..
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Old 01-17-2019, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,055 posts, read 1,973,186 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
1) I'd bet that store will do gangbuster business!

2) ALSO, just a quick question.....
What would you say are the differences between "Fresh Grocer" and "ShopRite?"
Given that they're sort of "sister" operations......if you had to differentiate them for someone who's not familiar what would you say about them? More limited selection? More international offerings? Different square footage? What? Why would. person pick one over the other?

Thanks

(This was prompted by MarketStEl's post about some Fresh Grocer and ShopRite in the Drexel Hill thread....but this thread is about supermarkets so I put it here so not to derail the other conversation.)
The differences between the two chains are vanishingly small, but:

it's my opinion that Fresh Grocer stores have a bigger selection of prepared foods to take home than ShopRites do. I chalk this up partly to the fact that the first Fresh Grocer opened at 40th and Walnut, on the edge of the Penn campus. Students living off-campus especially would probably go for such a big selection. The one near me - which is also right next to the La Salle campus - offers pizza, sushi, fried and rotisserie chicken, a salad bar, several different hot entrees each day (including several aimed to satisfy African-American tastes, like chitterlings), and a decent variety of sides. However, the lines at the store after work are longest at the hoagie counter.

I haven't checked this out for sure, but it also seems to me that Fresh Grocer stores have larger sections devoted to international food products, including Goya, Jamaican Choice, Chinese products and (at least at my local FG) Haitian specialty items. And it does seem that these selections are tailored to the neighborhood around the store.

Until Ron Burns and Jeff Brown scooped up several former Pathmarks and turned them into Fresh Grocers, I would say that the typical Fresh Grocer was smaller than the typical suburban supermarket. But even the smaller stores are pretty large. ShopRites are larger, though, and I think that may be why Burns converted the Drexeline Fresh Grocer, which predates the launch of Fresh Grocer and was larger than Burns' other FG stores, to a ShopRite.
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Old 01-17-2019, 11:03 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,099 posts, read 26,308,271 times
Reputation: 8545
Just out of curiosity, once Aldi and Lidl get dispersed around the city, do you think that they'll take out any competition? (Besides the one that you already figured out)
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Old 01-18-2019, 03:58 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,055 posts, read 1,973,186 times
Reputation: 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Just out of curiosity, once Aldi and Lidl get dispersed around the city, do you think that they'll take out any competition? (Besides the one that you already figured out)
Depends on where the stores are located.

I don't think Jeff Brown was talking completely through his hat; the sweetened-beverage tax wasn't the only reason that store is closing, but it probably left it more vulnerable to competition from a new Aldi, especially one located just over the city line.

I think that the city supermarkets that would be most vulnerable to an Aldi or Lidl opening near them would be:

--stores serving neighborhoods close to the city line, especially if the store opens on the other side of it and close enough to it to draw customers from the other store's patronage area

--Acme supermarkets serving neighborhoods with no other competition nearby

One of the things that has surprised me most about the supermarket picture hereabouts is how Acme has managed to migrate from being one of the most price-competitive chains as recently as 10 years ago to the absolute least price-competitive. I think that even Giant supermarkets, which have historically had prices on the high side, undercut Acme now. That chain once defined this region; now, it's just one among many. Beer and wine, however, may keep them afloat in many locations; they seem to have been pretty aggressive about locating not only beer and wine sections but even mini-pubs in their stores.
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