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Old 03-06-2018, 05:31 PM
 
5,210 posts, read 3,224,892 times
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I saw this the other day and saw it again today, so I figured I would share.

A report last week detailed the most gentrified zip codes in the country since the year 2000. The city of Philadelphia had two, zip codes on it: 19146 and 19123.

19123 has gentrified the 4th most in the country. The zip code is bounded by Callowhill St. to the South, Girard Ave. to the North, Front St. to the East, and Broad St. to the West.

19146 has gentrified the 8th most in the country. The zip code is bounded by Lombard St. to the North, Tasker St. to the South, Broad to the East, and the Forgotten Bottom to the West.

This LA neighborhood is the most gentrified in the US—and these other zip codes made the top 10



Those are pretty large portions of the city that saw dramatic demographic shifts already. I expect these areas to continue to gentrify for quite awhile.



If this study was done again in 2030, where do you think the most 'gentrified' places will be? Will it move north to 19125 or 19122? Will gentrification make it's way to Gray's Ferry eventually?



Is gentrification a good or bad thing?
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Old 03-06-2018, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
7,630 posts, read 3,661,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
I saw this the other day and saw it again today, so I figured I would share.

A report last week detailed the most gentrified zip codes in the country since the year 2000. The city of Philadelphia had two, zip codes on it: 19146 and 19123.
Here's the Local Angle version:

Two Philly Zip Codes Make List of Country's Top 10 Most Gentrified | Real Estate & Home | Philadelphia Magazine


Quote:
If this study was done again in 2030, where do you think the most 'gentrified' places will be? Will it move north to 19125 or 19122? Will gentrification make it's way to Gray's Ferry eventually?



Is gentrification a good or bad thing?

Answer to your last question first: Yes. I'll elaborate more below.

Now to the others: I refer to something I call "the Wave" when describing the changing fortunes of Philadelphia neighborhoods. This is the almost tidal flow of investment and rehabilitation into successive marginal neighborhoods outside the city core. I think if we were able to see an animated time series of maps depicting either median household income or median house prices by Census tract, you would be able to see the Wave spreading from Old City into Northern Liberties, the dam breaking in Hawthorne after the MLK Plaza towers were imploded and replaced by a rowhouse development, the transformation of G-Ho and the fitful patchwork reclamation of Point Breeze, plus some others.

19125 (Port Richmond) lies squarely in the Wave's path. There's a physical barrier that keeps it from entering the area more quickly, but it's entering.

Both 19121 and 19122 are a little more problematic, in part because of the 800-pound gorilla that straddles the two, Temple University. Temple has never figured out how to run plays from the Penn Urban Revitalization Playbook correctly, and thus it seems to stymie the right kind of investment more than it encourages it. Were APM (Associación de Puertorriqueños en Marcha, the mostly Hispanic community development and social-service agency based just to the east of the Temple campus) more in charge, I'd have more confidence that 19122 would see the Wave wash over it in a beneficial matter, but as long as Temple relies on its students more than its faculty, staff or neighbors to drive redevelopment, the Wave will flow around rather than through those two zip codes.

The Philadelphia Housing Authority is right now choking off the Wave's progress into Sharswood, the western part of 19122. (The Wave is already working its way through Brewerytown to Sharswood's west.) Which is somewhat curious and maybe ironic given how it got Hawthorne right. But the reasons there may be as much political as anything else; it managed to find good partners to execute a plan for the turnaround of MLK Plaza, while I have no idea who it wanted to favor in Sharswood, nor does anyone else.

Two physical barriers stand in the way of the Wave's washing over Grays Ferry. One is the elevated railroad viaduct over 25th Street. Like the ex-Reading embankment across Kensington, it's a psychological barrier, but it seems to me a bigger one than the Port Richmond one, despite the fact that the latter is wider. The other is the Schuylkill: even though Penn has planted a seed in Grays Ferry in the form of the Pennovation Works campus, the cross-river connections between U-City and Grays Ferry are less robust and negotiable than those tying U-City and Center City together. Elevated railroads themselves are not necessarily barriers; the Frankford Elevated is stimuatling redevelopment along it, and the - what's my posting handle? - in West Philly will do the same in due time. But there is a difference between the Market-Frankford Line and the other two rail routes: It carries people and the others don't. If they were adapted to carry passenger rail service, they too might serve as guideways rather than barriers.

Now, back to gentrification.

It's not the unalloyed force for evil its critics paint it out to be. In fact, it's closer to the opposite: It breathes new life into derelict, decayed or abandoned neighborhoods, and studies have shown that (a) it doesn't accelerate displacement and (b) the life chances and outcomes of the lower-income residents who remain improve when their neighborhoods gentrify. (c) Many residents of such neighborhoods, if you were to poll them, would say they welcomed the more upscale commercial amenities, and (d) it finally offers lower-income African-American homeowners (there are more of them in this city than in many others) a chance to cash in on their single sizable asset when they're ready to do so.

The downsides? It often forces low-income homeowners to sell before they're ready to, those same homeowners often don't realize their homes' actual value - house-flippers do, and the renters really get screwed. Except for the renters, we know how to deal with those other problems.
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Philadelphia is the most undervalued city in the nation.

And its value is slowly being realized from a multitude of angles.

Investment and development is certainly a positive, especially for Philadelphia, which has seen urban decay for over 50 years.

And there are still such wide swaths of Philadelphia neighborhoods, that have such mounting swaths of decay, still within close proximity to Philadelphia's core that you could say that the gentrification table, still has not shifted in unfathomable ways.

Although the real estate market, and growth of the cities neighborhoods are certainly something to be aware of.


I think the question should be less, is gentrification bad? Because we want investment in place.


What we want to ensure; is. Are we investing in communities, and how can we promote balanced growth and economic development so that we can reinvest resources into people.

I can't say the current zoning code is putting forth the BEST version of Philadelphia as it stands, and it is a shame because the powers that be, who want to protect their existing communities the most, in my opinion are the ones who are, pushing policies that only encourage the largest divides.
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Old 03-07-2018, 05:07 AM
 
Location: A neighborhood in Northeast Philadelphia
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I wish 19124 was gentrifying.
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Plymouth Meeting, PA.
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me too. I think it will over time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanis149 View Post
I wish 19124 was gentrifying.
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:33 AM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,405,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post




Now, back to gentrification.

It's not the unalloyed force for evil its critics paint it out to be. In fact, it's closer to the opposite: It breathes new life into derelict, decayed or abandoned neighborhoods, and studies have shown that (a) it doesn't accelerate displacement and (b) the life chances and outcomes of the lower-income residents who remain improve when their neighborhoods gentrify. (c) Many residents of such neighborhoods, if you were to poll them, would say they welcomed the more upscale commercial amenities, and (d) it finally offers lower-income African-American homeowners (there are more of them in this city than in many others) a chance to cash in on their single sizable asset when they're ready to do so.

The downsides? It often forces low-income homeowners to sell before they're ready to, those same homeowners often don't realize their homes' actual value - house-flippers do, and the renters really get screwed. Except for the renters, we know how to deal with those other problems.
I can't recall you ever giving an adequate, for me anyway, explanation of why many of those AA homeowners should sell at all. As long as they can handle the taxes they should stay put as their equity increases and they can make the generational shift of leaving property to heirs. Selling their property, to cash out(when they are "ready" as you put it) should not be viewed as if it was like winning a lottery.
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Old 03-07-2018, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
7,630 posts, read 3,661,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
I can't recall you ever giving an adequate, for me anyway, explanation of why many of those AA homeowners should sell at all. As long as they can handle the taxes they should stay put as their equity increases and they can make the generational shift of leaving property to heirs. Selling their property, to cash out(when they are "ready" as you put it) should not be viewed as if it was like winning a lottery.
If anything I said gave you the impression that I believe they should sell their homes if they don't want to, forgive me, for I surely didn't mean to endorse that as a plan of action.

But I do want to enable and empower them to do what most other homeowners in America can do, which is make a profit selling their home when they do decide to do so.

And what I want to discourage is anything that would force them to sell simply because the neighborhood around them has gotten pricier. Ditto selling to someone else who will unlock the value that should belong to them.

I don't disagree with anything you wrote above. Saying "when they're ready" does not imply that everyone will be ready to sell at some point; some won't want to for various reasons - they may want to leave the home to a child or relative, or they may have a sentimental attachment to it, or they may feel that even if they do sell and pocket a profit, they won't find something that they can afford somewhere else. The possible reasons are as varied as the homeowners themselves.

The point remains, though, that the process we label "gentrification" gives most of these homeowners the first real increase in equity since they bought their houses. They've been the victims of disinvestment for all this time, isn't it about time that was reversed?
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:25 PM
 
5,210 posts, read 3,224,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Here's the Local Angle version:
19125 (Port Richmond) lies squarely in the Wave's path. There's a physical barrier that keeps it from entering the area more quickly, but it's entering.
Agreed. Port Richmond has what all quality Philly neighborhoods have, good restaurants.

Quote:
Both 19121 and 19122 are a little more problematic, in part because of the 800-pound gorilla that straddles the two, Temple University. Temple has never figured out how to run plays from the Penn Urban Revitalization Playbook correctly, and thus it seems to stymie the right kind of investment more than it encourages it. Were APM (Associación de Puertorriqueños en Marcha, the mostly Hispanic community development and social-service agency based just to the east of the Temple campus) more in charge, I'd have more confidence that 19122 would see the Wave wash over it in a beneficial matter, but as long as Temple relies on its students more than its faculty, staff or neighbors to drive redevelopment, the Wave will flow around rather than through those two zip codes.
I disagree with you here. Temple has never been a hindrance to growth or a reason for the divestment of North Central when considering the actual factors at play imo. Maybe you could say that Temple's reliance on being a commuter school for most of it's history has something to do with the difference, but the overall general economics of the area are defined by industrial decay and that has led to a cycle of crime and poverty. What would APM do to develop the area in a 'beneficial matter'? I actually find all the development from Ridge Ave. north to be very appealing as an investment opportunity vs. places farther out in West Philly. I think the high rise tower being built at Broad and Masters St. is affirmation of major changes happening. Penn and Drexel combine for much more of an academic punch than Temple alone, and West Philadelphia housing was always in better shape than the tiny modest row houses that surround Temple (there are some gems tucked in throughout though).

Quote:
The Philadelphia Housing Authority is right now choking off the Wave's progress into Sharswood, the western part of 19122. (The Wave is already working its way through Brewerytown to Sharswood's west.) Which is somewhat curious and maybe ironic given how it got Hawthorne right. But the reasons there may be as much political as anything else; it managed to find good partners to execute a plan for the turnaround of MLK Plaza, while I have no idea who it wanted to favor in Sharswood, nor does anyone else.
Sharswoods will be Clarke's legacy in my opinion. The city is obviously doing something to attract so much development in Francisville. Is the PHA actually competent enough to pull off a Master Plan like the one they have proposed? The verdict is out still.

Last edited by thedirtypirate; 03-07-2018 at 03:40 PM..
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:27 PM
 
5,210 posts, read 3,224,892 times
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Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
I can't say the current zoning code is putting forth the BEST version of Philadelphia as it stands, and it is a shame because the powers that be, who want to protect their existing communities the most, in my opinion are the ones who are, pushing policies that only encourage the largest divides.
I agree. Up zoning around the subways and other avenues is an important step imo.

https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...evelopmen.html
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:32 PM
 
Location: The City
22,402 posts, read 33,807,883 times
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I think Temple needs a central street to build from, that may sound crazy with Broad running through it but Broad isn't lending itself to a neighborhood feel




maybe the back door from Brewerytown will get there and the new retail complex (hope isnt a box and paking lot)




I have a couple of student rental properties in Temple and follow the area, my students always tell me they don't like any of the Temple Options


Cecil B west of Broad could be so much more and a catalyst linking with Ridge coming from Brewerytown


like many neighborhoods it only takes one or two restaurants and a bar to set things in motion
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