U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Should Philly look to add a third subway line?
Yes, it would be a good long-term goal 18 50.00%
Yes, get on it right away 12 33.33%
No, it's not necessary 3 8.33%
No, it's not feasible 3 8.33%
Wouldn't really matter either way 0 0%
Voters: 36. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-11-2018, 08:43 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,705 posts, read 25,910,454 times
Reputation: 8260

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by PHL10 View Post
I'm not sure what your criticism is here but I use PATCO almost daily (live in CC and work in NJ). It operates as a heavy rail line, including great frequency (but with zoned fare) but since it terminates in CC, it is used primarily like commuter rail. I think this is what Oycumbler is getting at. The PATCO line would be used for intra-City travel (as opposed to just NJ to CC commuting) if it were extended through CC and in my mind, it wouldn't have to extend very far in order to function that way.
I asked the other poster with the big plans.

I specified the constraints. I don't think that the constraints registered. On the other hand, PATCO riders transfer to the Market Frankford El, the Broad Street Subway, etc. What is to stop SEPTA from building another line in proximity to PATCO.

I don't think that the poster has 1st hand knowledge of what he or she was saying.

PATCO is the Port Authority & is connected to the bridges, which subsidize PATCO. The River Line is NJT. What comes next? The bridges?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-11-2018, 09:52 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,705 posts, read 25,910,454 times
Reputation: 8260
Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
I have worked for the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.

SEPTA purchasing PATCO has been on a regional shortlist for quite a while as PATCO is owned by the Delaware River Port Authority.

I think the MAIN motivator behind this was SEPTA's planning infrastructure was more robust to aid in adding additional lines. (SEPTA is the 5th/6th transit agency in the nation and they have the internal systems to do transformational work with PATCO).


But do not ask me how that would work.


In recent days though Act 89 has totally transformed SEPTA's priorities. And Patco acquisition is much lower on the list.

South New Jersey is underserved by transit.

I have no idea what this relationship is truly intended to be.

But it has been a SEPTA agenda for a while.
PATCO exists because the feds were looking to make a example of what they were pushing for the 70s. They had the money to allow PATCO to build the other 2 lines. Trenton refused to play ball. That federal money was given to Atlanta. The River Line was much later & nobody wanted it. The Atlantic City line is a whole different thing.

Bridge tolls subsidize PATCO tickets. Unless SEPTA buys the bridges & PATCO, there's a disconnect.

Trenton has never had any interest in South Jersey for anything other than draining the tax money to use in North Jersey.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2018, 11:06 AM
 
912 posts, read 1,066,613 times
Reputation: 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Don't know whether you are joking or not.

Chances are they are going to have perpetual dry/fire seasons.

I was not joking. You asked for an idea on how to deal with the flooding earlier. So, I gave you one!
It might not be so feasible (at this time), but maybe in the future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2018, 11:44 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,705 posts, read 25,910,454 times
Reputation: 8260
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessimprov View Post
I was not joking. You asked for an idea on how to deal with the flooding earlier. So, I gave you one!
It might not be so feasible (at this time), but maybe in the future.
It's not such a bad idea. If a few tankers could be provided by FEEMA to pump flood water, then if the filled tanks could be taken, pro bono, on freight trains, & just dumped into the ground, since the ground would act as a filter, it could work toward alleviating 2 problems. If it took 6 months for the tanks to go coast to coast & get back, big deal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2018, 12:51 PM
 
Location: A neighborhood in Northeast Philadelphia
17 posts, read 6,197 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Philly should look into a new subway line. Adding a line in Northeast Philly would be my highest priority but I think most of the residents in the Northeast especially the far Northeast would strongly oppose any type of heavy rail subway expansion. In some of their minds, they have seen what has happened to Frankford as a long term result of being connected to the Market-Frankford line and don't want all that "negative baggage" in their neighborhoods or else the far Northeast will become a "there goes the neighborhood" type of area that you will find in other sections of the city.

Southwest could definitely benefit from having a subway line. Just build the line over whatever trolley line that has the highest ridership.
I live in the northeast and know many people that live here now would use better transit here. You take route 1 every day for long enough and you would end up hating it too.

It's just that the Northeast had a chance to get better transit

And they didn't take it
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2018, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,392 posts, read 10,020,548 times
Reputation: 5235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanis149 View Post
I live in the northeast and know many people that live here now would use better transit here. You take route 1 every day for long enough and you would end up hating it too.

It's just that the Northeast had a chance to get better transit

And they didn't take it
I'm sure some want better mass transit but that doesn't mean most want a new subway line. A new regional rail line in the Northeast would have a lot more support.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2018, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,772 posts, read 1,826,828 times
Reputation: 2295
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
I'm sure some want better mass transit but that doesn't mean most want a new subway line. A new regional rail line in the Northeast would have a lot more support.
I know why the residents of the Northeast freaked out at the prospect of a subway extension in the 1950s.

They didn't get one in the 1970s because Frank Rizzo, when told by outgoing Transportation Secretary (and old friend from his days in Philly) Willam Coleman that only one of two funding proposals the city had sent him could get money, told Coleman to fund the Commuter Tunnel.

Both the 1992 transit alternatives study the city conducted in its study of a possible Boulevard subway and an unscientific DVRPC phone poll around 2012 showed that Northeast residents did want a subway now and would ride it if one were built.

Three Regional Rail lines already serve the Northeast: one up its Delaware River side, one into the western end of the central Northeast (Fox Chase), and one that crosses its northwest corner. Given where the railroad lines run and what those lines connect to, a subway up the middle of the Northeast probably makes more sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 08:40 AM
 
8,315 posts, read 4,489,641 times
Reputation: 2767
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
It's not such a bad idea. If a few tankers could be provided by FEEMA to pump flood water, then if the filled tanks could be taken, pro bono, on freight trains, & just dumped into the ground, since the ground would act as a filter, it could work toward alleviating 2 problems. If it took 6 months for the tanks to go coast to coast & get back, big deal.

What I was kinda looking for was how do we manage the flooding from our rivers and creeks with something more inventive. Silos? Really? I guess if they are engineered, obviously, for that purpose and look attractive enough.

How do we manage the encrouchment of sea level change which is already affecting low lying areas at the mouth of the Delaware River?

And shipping water west? How feasible is it although I, of course, know that oil is piped over a ton of mileage around the country.

The reason I'm bringing this up is because young people on this board will be affected by these things in ways you and me probably won't be as much. It's, obviously, about their future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 08:45 AM
 
8,315 posts, read 4,489,641 times
Reputation: 2767
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I know why the residents of the Northeast freaked out at the prospect of a subway extension in the 1950s.

They didn't get one in the 1970s because Frank Rizzo, when told by outgoing Transportation Secretary (and old friend from his days in Philly) Willam Coleman that only one of two funding proposals the city had sent him could get money, told Coleman to fund the Commuter Tunnel.

Both the 1992 transit alternatives study the city conducted in its study of a possible Boulevard subway and an unscientific DVRPC phone poll around 2012 showed that Northeast residents did want a subway now and would ride it if one were built.

Three Regional Rail lines already serve the Northeast: one up its Delaware River side, one into the western end of the central Northeast (Fox Chase), and one that crosses its northwest corner. Given where the railroad lines run and what those lines connect to, a subway up the middle of the Northeast probably makes more sense.
Just a sidebar footnote about Bill Coleman. His older sister was my Mom's roomate in college at, what was, Hampton Institute, now Hampton U.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 09:19 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,705 posts, read 25,910,454 times
Reputation: 8260
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
What I was kinda looking for was how do we manage the flooding from our rivers and creeks with something more inventive. Silos? Really? I guess if they are engineered, obviously, for that purpose and look attractive enough.

How do we manage the encrouchment of sea level change which is already affecting low lying areas at the mouth of the Delaware River?

And shipping water west? How feasible is it although I, of course, know that oil is piped over a ton of mileage around the country.

The reason I'm bringing this up is because young people on this board will be affected by these things in ways you and me probably won't be as much. It's, obviously, about their future.
At first I thought that shipping water west sounded crazy. Then I thought about people pumping water out of flooded houses, only to have part of it seep back on.

Flood water is usually dirty & not fit to drink but California needs massive amounts of water. It's not a bad idea, if it can be done on the cheap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top