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Old 11-13-2018, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,027 posts, read 4,021,471 times
Reputation: 1378

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To me, in some ways, the South Jersey burbs are more a part of Philly culture than the PA burbs, for what I think are three main reasons:

1 - Many SJ residents once lived in the city. If they didn’t, their parents often did.

2 - The towns in PA are much more independent of the city. The PA towns have more jobs, colleges/universities, cultural/historical attractions, etc.

3 - Many people living in the PA burbs don’t like the city, and don’t go into it a whole lot. This permeates the independent aspect mentioned in #2 above. To me, SJ people are generally much more likely to go into the city, and IMO are much more likely to speak well of the city.
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Old 11-14-2018, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,108 posts, read 5,539,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Haha. I missed that. I would hope that Philadelphians would consider South Philly residents to be Philadelphians.
I think it was a typo and the OP meant to ask if Philadelphians would consider South Jersey residents....

I am from the suburbs of Philly and certainly consider myself a Philadelphian. My ex-boyfriend, however, when I first met him said he was from "South Jersey". I really didn't know what South Jersey meant -- did that mean the shore? (I later realized it's those lower counties in Jersey.) Anyway, so I would say people from South Jersey would normally not say they're from Philadelphia. Jersey does have its own quirky identity, like all the diners and catering places! But they certainly identify with the Philly sports teams and as part of the Philly metro area. Especially a place like Collingswood, which is right over the bridge.

But if you truly want to be a Philadelphian, move to Philly! I don't live there anymore but it is still my hometown, I still love it and go back as often as I can, including for the Eagles Super Bowl parade! It's a wonderful city and I think you'll love it.
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Old 11-14-2018, 01:56 AM
 
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
6 posts, read 1,796 times
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Thanks so much for these answers everyone - really helpful . Appreciate it!
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:23 AM
 
173 posts, read 64,199 times
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What follows is only my opinion/experience. South Jersey is absolutely part of Metro Philadelphia. In some ways, they are closer and in some ways more distant in their relationship to the City. SJ is obviously in a different state and have no common government with the rest of the metro. and that creates a certain separation. The majority of the metro in in PA so the center of gravity is always across the river. Maybe similar to the US/Canada relationship, Canadians generally are very aware of everything US where many/most Americans could really care less about north of the border. Outside of the shore, most PA residents of the Metro could care less what goes on across the bridges. Also, a certain amount of North Jersey (NY) culture finds its way down to SJ. This is a silly example but calling a “hoagie” a “sub” is not uncommon in SJ, even among people have been there for a few generations.

I also find that SJ picks and chooses to be a “Philadelphian” vs. a “Jersey Girl!” when it suits them. But I have to say that this split loyalty goes on in the PA burbs as well. The attitude of “Philadelphia is a sh*thole and why would I ever visit that third world mess?” is much more common in the PA suburbs than in SJ.
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Old 11-14-2018, 12:06 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,949 posts, read 4,562,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPP1999 View Post
To me, in some ways, the South Jersey burbs are more a part of Philly culture than the PA burbs, for what I think are three main reasons:

1 - Many SJ residents once lived in the city. If they didnít, their parents often did.

2 - The towns in PA are much more independent of the city. The PA towns have more jobs, colleges/universities, cultural/historical attractions, etc.

3 - Many people living in the PA burbs donít like the city, and donít go into it a whole lot. This permeates the independent aspect mentioned in #2 above. To me, SJ people are generally much more likely to go into the city, and IMO are much more likely to speak well of the city.
This made me laugh actually. Slight shade thrown at SJ for its lack of culture and attractions. But I do agree, suburban PA counties function as their own region and aren't really dependent on Philadelphia, unlike SJ which is almost entirely dependent on Philadelphia.

PA burbs are more comparable to NJ burbs.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
918 posts, read 439,769 times
Reputation: 973
This is all a historical narrative.

Southeast Pennsylvania has always been the more developed region.

DUH (We have Philadelphia).

It is the wealthier region. And also the region with more issues on our plate.

Southeast Pennsylvania population : Nearly 5 Million

South Jersey Population: 1.5 Million

Point of the comparison. S. New Jersey is great for what it is. I dont dislike it, but for a true unity of city and state mindset. Turn to Southeast Pennsylvania. Have you honestly met a Philadelphian or Pennsylvanian who like Jersey. Nah.

S. NJ is fine and dandy I truly don't dislike. Only when they think they share the assets of our region(southeast PA), which honestly are quite profound.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:55 PM
 
697 posts, read 530,401 times
Reputation: 749
Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
This is all a historical narrative.

Southeast Pennsylvania has always been the more developed region.

DUH (We have Philadelphia).

It is the wealthier region. And also the region with more issues on our plate.

Southeast Pennsylvania population : Nearly 5 Million

South Jersey Population: 1.5 Million

Point of the comparison. S. New Jersey is great for what it is. I dont dislike it, but for a true unity of city and state mindset. Turn to Southeast Pennsylvania. Have you honestly met a Philadelphian or Pennsylvanian who like Jersey. Nah.

S. NJ is fine and dandy I truly don't dislike. Only when they think they share the assets of our region(southeast PA), which honestly are quite profound.

"More issues on our plate" What do you mean by that?
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Old 11-15-2018, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,108 posts, read 5,539,935 times
Reputation: 6444
Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
This is all a historical narrative.

Southeast Pennsylvania has always been the more developed region.

DUH (We have Philadelphia).

It is the wealthier region. And also the region with more issues on our plate.

Southeast Pennsylvania population : Nearly 5 Million

South Jersey Population: 1.5 Million

Point of the comparison. S. New Jersey is great for what it is. I dont dislike it, but for a true unity of city and state mindset. Turn to Southeast Pennsylvania. Have you honestly met a Philadelphian or Pennsylvanian who like Jersey. Nah.

S. NJ is fine and dandy I truly don't dislike. Only when they think they share the assets of our region(southeast PA), which honestly are quite profound.
I don't have the slightest idea what you are talking about.

The OP is not asking for data and statistics. He's asking about a "feeling" and perception.
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Old 11-15-2018, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,726 posts, read 1,809,318 times
Reputation: 2265
Many South Jerseyites moved not just from Philly, but from South Philly. In terms of ethnic flavor, you'll find a lot more of the deracinated Italian/Irish flavor and much less WASPiness in South Jersey than you will in the Pennsylvania 'burbs (and in those, Delaware County more closely resembles South Jersey in this regard than the other three collar counties do).

Coming as I do from the one American metropolis that is an exception to this rule*, I've become quite aware of the dynamics of bi- or multi-state metropolitan areas in the US. Usually, when a metropolitan area includes territory in more than one state, the area in the state(s) that do(es) not contain the core city is generally regarded as in some respects separate from or lesser than the part that's in the same state as the core city. Take a look at St. Louis' Illinois suburbs (and East St. Louis and Camden are almost exact matches), or Chicago's in Northwest Indiana, or how New Yorkers regard North Jersey and to a lesser extent Southwest Connecticut.

I even pattern this behavior in the channel I run at Philadelphia magazine. You will occasionally find houses in South Jersey featured on our real estate channel, and the community guides I write venture into South Jersey too - like most everyone who's visited it lately, I sang the praises of Collingswood to high heaven. But when I do the weekend list of featured open houses, I almost always pick one house in each of the five Southeastern Pennsylvania counties and omit South Jersey. (I will occasionally do an all-South Jersey edition of this.)

*There is one other exception: Washington, DC, as the District of Columbia is part of no state. Its three constituent states or state equivalents tend to be regarded on an equal footing by the locals and the local media. This is even reflected in the now-common use of "the DMV" to refer to the region.
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Old 11-15-2018, 04:26 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,634 posts, read 25,862,144 times
Reputation: 8216
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Many South Jerseyites moved not just from Philly, but from South Philly. In terms of ethnic flavor, you'll find a lot more of the deracinated Italian/Irish flavor and much less WASPiness in South Jersey than you will in the Pennsylvania 'burbs (and in those, Delaware County more closely resembles South Jersey in this regard than the other three collar counties do).

Coming as I do from the one American metropolis that is an exception to this rule*, I've become quite aware of the dynamics of bi- or multi-state metropolitan areas in the US. Usually, when a metropolitan area includes territory in more than one state, the area in the state(s) that do(es) not contain the core city is generally regarded as in some respects separate from or lesser than the part that's in the same state as the core city. Take a look at St. Louis' Illinois suburbs (and East St. Louis and Camden are almost exact matches), or Chicago's in Northwest Indiana, or how New Yorkers regard North Jersey and to a lesser extent Southwest Connecticut.

I even pattern this behavior in the channel I run at Philadelphia magazine. You will occasionally find houses in South Jersey featured on our real estate channel, and the community guides I write venture into South Jersey too - like most everyone who's visited it lately, I sang the praises of Collingswood to high heaven. But when I do the weekend list of featured open houses, I almost always pick one house in each of the five Southeastern Pennsylvania counties and omit South Jersey. (I will occasionally do an all-South Jersey edition of this.)

*There is one other exception: Washington, DC, as the District of Columbia is part of no state. Its three constituent states or state equivalents tend to be regarded on an equal footing by the locals and the local media. This is even reflected in the now-common use of "the DMV" to refer to the region.
The real loser in the tristate area is Delaware, which many people tend to forget about completely, but it's still there.

I lived in South Jersey for over 40 years. In real life I never ran into the animosity towards South Jersey that a few posters are comfortable in voicing on this board.
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