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Old 12-22-2018, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Fishtown, Philadelphia
7 posts, read 2,066 times
Reputation: 14

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
This is a good example of gentrification. It is good when it happens organically but disruptive if driven by external factors (read new residents coming in).
Happy to be considered good gentrification?
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Old 12-22-2018, 08:00 PM
 
8,539 posts, read 4,659,201 times
Reputation: 2854
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUGGLES99 View Post
and as an add, millennials are fkg up the world.
That's funny because the very oldest of the Greatest Generation thought the same thing about the Silent Generation. Silents should rightly get credit for the invention of rock n roll. Watch the old movie Bye Bye Birdie to get a bit of education about that or watch the James Dean classic, Rebel Without A Cause.

Greats also had a bunch of kids during the late 40s/50s into the early 60s, i.e. Baby Boomers. Some of the very oldest Boomers and youngest Silents caused a fair amount of havoc protesting the Vietnam War in the late 60s.

Generational conflicts and misunderstandings are pretty normal.

Plus the older millennials I'm around are having children and buildings families. Something you should be in favor of I would think.
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Old 12-23-2018, 04:59 PM
 
Location: In the heights
20,818 posts, read 22,383,498 times
Reputation: 10796
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUGGLES99 View Post
and as an add, millennials are fkg up the world.
Under which generation did Philadelphia and many urban US cities see continued and steady decline, eh?
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Old 12-25-2018, 01:53 PM
 
79 posts, read 30,462 times
Reputation: 87
Personally I don't see Frankford gentrifying anytime soon on the scale of Fishtown. I find it interesting that you would decide to skip over Kensington and Harrowgate which is most likely due to how hard those neighborhoods are being affected by the opiod crisis. I think Lehigh Avenue and the underpass immediately after prevent development further in Kensington. Over my way in Port Richmond there are a few new homes that I agree look sleek but seem very shoddy construction.
Frankford can really be split into two neighborhoods that can be night and day. The Northwood section (West of the El) is a stable lower middle class neighborhood with plenty trees and beautiful twins. The rest of Frankford east of the El has more a similar built environment to pre gentrification Fishtown. This section is much rougher and in the next ten years I can see it possibly stabalizing with a few new homes and new businesses. However unless Philly lands something on the scale of Amazon's HQ2 I don't see full gentrification taking off in the near future. Frankford now is much rougher than the Fishtown I remember as a kid and change in Frankford will come slower than in Fishtown due to distance to Center City and what is currently happening between Frankford and Fishtown around Somerset and K&A. Good luck and I would be very curious how this turns out for you guys
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Old 12-26-2018, 10:44 AM
 
Location: The Best Philly, West Philly
926 posts, read 653,271 times
Reputation: 2310
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7thgen View Post
Agreed about the badlands. Some investors are buying up around that area but being a Philly native I can't see west of the El and north of Lehigh ever getting better. I won't have kids while living in Frankford. We're both entrepreneurs and moved to Fishtown long before anything cool showed up. We see Frankford with a lot of the same attributes that Fishtown had back 10 years ago. We're just trying to be ahead of the curve and be a part of another Philly neighborhood that used to be beautiful, making its return to its intended state.
I'm a Philly native as well, although I'm probably younger (23) than you since I'm technically Generation Z. I'm not sure about Fairhill, but I can definitely see the areas west of the El (Norris Square and West Kensington) becoming as revitalized as East Kensington. I walk through those areas frequently, and new homes are popping up at places I would have never imagined as a kid a decade ago: Front and Huntingdon, 5th and Norris, 4th and Cecil B. Moore, etc. I used to take the train into Temple before finding a place on campus, and I always used to look out the window and see how vacant Ludlow (approximately Girard to Cecil B. Moore, 9th to 6th Streets) was back in 2016. Two years later, and new housing is sprouting up everywhere in that neighborhood!

If we can keep the positive trends and job/population growth going, then the 2020s will be a very interesting decade for the city. I'm expecting Strawberry Mansion, East Parkside, Belmont, and parts of Kingsessing to undergo revitalization. There aren't explicitly bad parts of South Philly anymore, so I expect it to continue to densify and grow wealthier. I think that development will eventually jump across Lehigh Ave and reach at least Somerset Street, the area around Tioga will continue to become its own little enclave due to all the industrial loft conversions, and I believe that Frankford certainly has the bones to become revitalized. Cobbs Creek and some of the neighborhoods north of Market Street in West Philly will be interesting to watch, as will Germantown.
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:04 AM
 
160 posts, read 282,107 times
Reputation: 91
Last year I drove through Harrowgate on Tioga St and couldn't believe how much garbage and litter was on the streets, what a dump. I hope to never see have to pass that way again.
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Old 12-27-2018, 05:19 PM
 
1,230 posts, read 1,533,812 times
Reputation: 1037
Don't do it.
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Old 12-28-2018, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Fishtown, Philadelphia
7 posts, read 2,066 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan2013 View Post
I'm a Philly native as well, although I'm probably younger (23) than you since I'm technically Generation Z. I'm not sure about Fairhill, but I can definitely see the areas west of the El (Norris Square and West Kensington) becoming as revitalized as East Kensington. I walk through those areas frequently, and new homes are popping up at places I would have never imagined as a kid a decade ago: Front and Huntingdon, 5th and Norris, 4th and Cecil B. Moore, etc. I used to take the train into Temple before finding a place on campus, and I always used to look out the window and see how vacant Ludlow (approximately Girard to Cecil B. Moore, 9th to 6th Streets) was back in 2016. Two years later, and new housing is sprouting up everywhere in that neighborhood!

If we can keep the positive trends and job/population growth going, then the 2020s will be a very interesting decade for the city. I'm expecting Strawberry Mansion, East Parkside, Belmont, and parts of Kingsessing to undergo revitalization. There aren't explicitly bad parts of South Philly anymore, so I expect it to continue to densify and grow wealthier. I think that development will eventually jump across Lehigh Ave and reach at least Somerset Street, the area around Tioga will continue to become its own little enclave due to all the industrial loft conversions, and I believe that Frankford certainly has the bones to become revitalized. Cobbs Creek and some of the neighborhoods north of Market Street in West Philly will be interesting to watch, as will Germantown.
Oh yea Norris Square & West Kensington is well on its way to becoming the next Olde Kensington/Ludlow. I'm mainly talking about the next move up - beyond the tracks and into El Campamento area and how we feel it may just jump right over K&A/Fairhill area. Eventually, all cities will follow the path of DC & Boston over the past decade where virtually the whole city has become revitalized.

With the number of people from our generations, millennials & gen Z, that are looking to live in a city, its bound to happen in Philly as well. Philly is just a laggard and it always has been
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Old 12-28-2018, 11:46 AM
 
839 posts, read 339,658 times
Reputation: 1613
Where are these millennials getting the money to buy 500k homes? Trust fund babies? Does sphilly have a lot of high paying jobs?
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Old 12-30-2018, 08:25 AM
 
957 posts, read 1,091,958 times
Reputation: 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonaldJTrump View Post
Where are these millennials getting the money to buy 500k homes? Trust fund babies? Does sphilly have a lot of high paying jobs?
I think so. Some people I run into talk big, but when I see the jobs they have, then it's unlikely they got it on their own even though they act like it.
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