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Old 02-04-2019, 06:22 PM
 
90 posts, read 12,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeanie Beanie View Post
I heard on the news that there was a first-time Chinese New Year festival in the Northeast this weekend, complete with red and gold fireworks and a dragon dancing in the street. The news story said that the Northeast has become a magnet for Asian families that have been priced out of New York. Could this be the sort of cultural revitalization that the area is looking for? Your thoughts...
A firm 'yes' to "Chinatown Northeast."


Smart, civil, non-violent, working people who value education and a dollar and want to own and live in their own homes are exactly what the area needs.

Last edited by Indiana Tony; 02-04-2019 at 06:57 PM..
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Old Today, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,188 posts, read 2,025,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
On a smaller scale there was also black flight of sorts. Lots of educated and middle class blacks left W. Philly, for instance, once issues like red-lining became less omnipresent. I know about it because that's what my parents did. My mom grew up in the suburbs so it seemed natural for them. A lot of their friends ended up in West Mt Airy and Cedarbrook. Another set of their friends were among the first residents of Yorktown in N. Philly. Still others others went to S. Jersey.
(emphasis added)

Ahem. I'ma hafta sic Diane Richardson on you.
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Old Today, 11:24 AM
 
477 posts, read 374,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
(emphasis added)

Ahem. I'ma hafta sic Diane Richardson on you.
Haha. I noticed recently that yet another sign identifying the neighborhood as Mt. Airy has been installed. The new one is closer to Ms. Richardsonís house on Gilbert Street. The sign is in the median where Michener Avenue, Vernon Road and Greenwood Street intersect.
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Old Today, 11:32 AM
 
90 posts, read 12,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
Haha. I noticed recently that yet another sign identifying the neighborhood as Mt. Airy has been installed. The new one is closer to Ms. Richardsonís house on Gilbert Street. The sign is in the median where Michener Avenue, Vernon Road and Greenwood Street intersect.
A woman's body was found in a trash can right on the street in East Mount Airy (1800 block of E. Cliveden) yesterday morning.


The article said both 'East Mount Airy' and 'Cedarbrook.' Which is it?
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Old Today, 11:47 AM
 
477 posts, read 374,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indiana Tony View Post
A woman's body was found in a trash can right on the street in East Mount Airy (1800 block of E. Cliveden) yesterday morning.


The article said both 'East Mount Airy' and 'Cedarbrook.' Which is it?
Itís not Cedarbrook. That specific location on Cliveden is open for debate. Iíve heard people refer to it as East Mt. Airy and as West Oak Lane. As for Cedarbrook, Iíve yet to meet someone who lives within its supposed boundaries who refers to it by that name. I can tell you for certain as someone who lived there in the 1960s when the neighborhood was predominantly white that everyone referred to it as Mt. Airy back then. Cedarbrook came into use when East Mt. Airy Neighbors was formed and they set the organizationís eastern boundary at Stenton Avenue. Here is a link to MSEís article on the neighborhood. Itís worth reading. https://nextcity.org/features/view/p...ods-mount-airy
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Old Today, 11:52 AM
 
90 posts, read 12,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
Itís not Cedarbrook. That specific location on Cliveden is open for debate. Iíve heard people refer to it as East Mt. Airy and as West Oak Lane. As for Cedarbrook, Iíve yet to meet someone who lives within its supposed boundaries who refers to it by that name. I can tell you for certain as someone who lived there in the 1960s when the neighborhood was predominantly white that everyone referred to it as Mt. Airy back then. Cedarbrook came into use when East Mt. Airy Neighbors was formed and they set the organizationís eastern boundary at Stenton Avenue. Here is a link to MSEís article on the neighborhood. Itís worth reading. https://nextcity.org/features/view/p...ods-mount-airy
Thanks.


Ms. Richardson must have complained to the news and had the headline changed to 'Cedarbrook.' I get it.
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Old Today, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,188 posts, read 2,025,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indiana Tony View Post
As far as 'diversity' being pushed out of Fishtown and Kensington: If you're talking about racial diversity, it isn't true. The people "moving up" at that time from those neighborhoods were majority white. The 'diversity' mostly arrived through Section 8 and the working-class being able to afford cheap rowhomes.
Fishtown remains mostly white even now. What changed there is the socioeconomic status of the residents more than their race.

But that change has made it possible for people like me to visit, and even move, there without feeling like we're taking our lives in our hands.

And the new arrivals in Fishtown are upgrading that neighborhood.
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Old Today, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,188 posts, read 2,025,175 times
Reputation: 2641
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
Itís not Cedarbrook. That specific location on Cliveden is open for debate. Iíve heard people refer to it as East Mt. Airy and as West Oak Lane. As for Cedarbrook, Iíve yet to meet someone who lives within its supposed boundaries who refers to it by that name. I can tell you for certain as someone who lived there in the 1960s when the neighborhood was predominantly white that everyone referred to it as Mt. Airy back then. Cedarbrook came into use when East Mt. Airy Neighbors was formed and they set the organizationís eastern boundary at Stenton Avenue. Here is a link to MSEís article on the neighborhood. Itís worth reading. https://nextcity.org/features/view/p...ods-mount-airy
For a little more historical background: The outsiders give the neighborhood that name because it was the name of the golf course that occupied all of its territory (under a different name) prior to 1921, when it moved across the city line into Cheltenham Township. (It moved again, to Blue Bell, in 1961, when the Pennsylvania Department of Highways (now PennDOT) announced it would run the Fort Washington Expressway (Route 309) right through it; a shopping center and several large apartment towers occupy the site of the second golf course now.) That golf course, by the way, opened in the late 1890s as the Mt. Airy Golf Club. The Mt. Airy course closed in 1908 when developers bought half its land for building; the remaining half reorganized as the Stenton Country Club.

I can't find any evidence yet of what the land was used for between 1924, when the Stenton Country Club property was sold, and 1946, which is when the oldest church I've identified in the neighborhood yet was built. (There's another church that looks older; it's a stone Gothic Revival structure that looks something like a Carnegie library on the outside. I haven't yet checked out its construction date.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Indiana Tony View Post
Thanks.


Ms. Richardson must have complained to the news and had the headline changed to 'Cedarbrook.' I get it.
Um, no, you don't, Tony. Go read my article. That's the last thing Diane Richardson would do. She - and everybody else in what I referred to as "upper East Mt. Airy" in that story - would sooner die than say they live in Cedarbrook.

But don't think the crime doesn't upset them. Again, read my article; while I was researching it, an aide to a fellow campaigning for a state representative seat in the district that includes this area was shot execution-style in broad daylight while he was talking to someone on the street in front of the small strip of shops on Vernon Road right where that second "Welcome to Mt. Airy" sign was just erected. That murder rattled everyone's nerves there.

One reason the confusion persists is because the rest of Mt. Airy lies entirely within the boundaries of pre-consolidation Germantown Township, just like Chestnut Hill and Germantown (a separate borough at the time of consolidation in 1854) do. What some call Cedarbrook lies in pre-consolidation Bristol Township, which also includes both Oak Lanes, Ogontz and Fern Rock. Because of this, the City Planning Commission also puts this neighborhood in North rather than Northwest Philadelphia. I don't think it belongs there either.

The old boundary is visible in street addresses along Stenton Avenue. The street's east (south) side lies within Germantown Township, and addresses there follow the Germantown grid. The west (north) side, in Bristol Township, follows the city grid, bent about 45 degrees off axis. The north-south streets in it continue the addresses of Ogontz Avenue, which is in the 7000s where Wister Street (Germantown's eastern (southern) border) crosses it; they're in the upper 5000s in Germantown at that point.
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Old Today, 04:47 PM
 
477 posts, read 374,451 times
Reputation: 749
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
For a little more historical background: The outsiders give the neighborhood that name because it was the name of the golf course that occupied all of its territory (under a different name) prior to 1921, when it moved across the city line into Cheltenham Township. (It moved again, to Blue Bell, in 1961, when the Pennsylvania Department of Highways (now PennDOT) announced it would run the Fort Washington Expressway (Route 309) right through it; a shopping center and several large apartment towers occupy the site of the second golf course now.) That golf course, by the way, opened in the late 1890s as the Mt. Airy Golf Club. The Mt. Airy course closed in 1908 when developers bought half its land for building; the remaining half reorganized as the Stenton Country Club.

I can't find any evidence yet of what the land was used for between 1924, when the Stenton Country Club property was sold, and 1946, which is when the oldest church I've identified in the neighborhood yet was built. (There's another church that looks older; it's a stone Gothic Revival structure that looks something like a Carnegie library on the outside. I haven't yet checked out its construction date.)



Um, no, you don't, Tony. Go read my article. That's the last thing Diane Richardson would do. She - and everybody else in what I referred to as "upper East Mt. Airy" in that story - would sooner die than say they live in Cedarbrook.

But don't think the crime doesn't upset them. Again, read my article; while I was researching it, an aide to a fellow campaigning for a state representative seat in the district that includes this area was shot execution-style in broad daylight while he was talking to someone on the street in front of the small strip of shops on Vernon Road right where that second "Welcome to Mt. Airy" sign was just erected. That murder rattled everyone's nerves there.

One reason the confusion persists is because the rest of Mt. Airy lies entirely within the boundaries of pre-consolidation Germantown Township, just like Chestnut Hill and Germantown (a separate borough at the time of consolidation in 1854) do. What some call Cedarbrook lies in pre-consolidation Bristol Township, which also includes both Oak Lanes, Ogontz and Fern Rock. Because of this, the City Planning Commission also puts this neighborhood in North rather than Northwest Philadelphia. I don't think it belongs there either.

The old boundary is visible in street addresses along Stenton Avenue. The street's east (south) side lies within Germantown Township, and addresses there follow the Germantown grid. The west (north) side, in Bristol Township, follows the city grid, bent about 45 degrees off axis. The north-south streets in it continue the addresses of Ogontz Avenue, which is in the 7000s where Wister Street (Germantown's eastern (southern) border) crosses it; they're in the upper 5000s in Germantown at that point.
Part of that land remained a driving range until the late 1930s or early 1940s. Also some of that land was developed with houses prior to WWII. A decent portion of the houses between Washington Lane and Upsal were built before the war. Some were built as early as the 1920s. Also the 900 block of Dorset was built in the ‘30s unlike all of the surrounding blocks which were developed after the war. The houses in the immediate vicinity of Enon were built between the late 1930s through the war years. Orleans built the row houses along Michener and nearby streets. Despite the fact that he was Jewish he was forbidden by lenders to sell to Jews. Of course after the war many Jews moved into that area.

St Raymond was founded in November 1941 and worshiped in a barn owned by the Nolan family (who weren’t Catholic but allowed the congregation to use the barn) until the current church on Vernon Road opened in 1949. The land in the area that wasn’t developed was farmland / estate land until the post-war era. My father grew up in West Oak Lane and he and his friends used to walk up to the area to play in a branch of Tookany Creek (it starts as a spring beneath the playground at Edmonds and runs underneath Greenwood Street) and the east branch of the Wingohocking which runs under Mansfield Avenue. They weren’t put in culverts until after the War.

If you are over that way go check out the mid 19th century farmhouse that sits between Rodney and Lowber just to the north of Gorgas. It was built by the Unruh family for one their children. They owned most of the land in the neighborhood during the 19th century. In fact they donated the land occupied by Ivy Hill Cemetery.

Stenton Golf Club changed its name to Cedarbrook because the land they purchased was part of Cedarbrook Farm which was a well-known landmark in Cheltenham at the time. Cedarbrook Middle school bears the name for the same reason. It was built on what remained of Cedarbrook Farm at the time.
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