U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-05-2019, 08:59 AM
 
143 posts, read 95,491 times
Reputation: 189

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
This does not apply to Asian immigrants. I think it's limited to Hispanics, they have disdain for English which is perplexing given their insistence on immigrating to the US
Not only is this a generalization, but it's an incorrect one. I live in a heavily Asian neighborhood, and almost none of them speak anything close to English. Their kids, maybe, but the adults are content to live in their own bubble.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-05-2019, 09:04 AM
 
143 posts, read 95,491 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Good schools and poverty are ALMOST completely linked. Chestnut Hill and Mount Airy are two examples where the schools should be better, but nearly everyone with money sends their children to private school. Jenks should be a top city school.

On the other end, it takes time to change a school once money arrives, assuming people invest in the school. There can be a delay for sure.
CH and Mount Airy were two areas I thought of immediately. Far Northeast, too.

The "good" city schools weren't always good. It took pioneering parents to say, "You know what? We're going to stay and make this work." And from that sprung some of the best rated schools we have today. Problem is, people usually want the "perfect" school today, instead of settling on a "good" school and working to make it better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 10:41 AM
 
Location: The Best Philly, West Philly
944 posts, read 660,935 times
Reputation: 2359
There's one huge component that often gets overlooked when it comes to discussions about the Philly SD: the part that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania plays in it. Across PA, urban and rural SDs--which typically host a larger number of students living in poverty--are underfunded compared to suburban SDs. This is due to how SD funding is linked to the property taxes that a SD can collect. Districts that host a larger number of students on the lower end of the socioeconomic continuum often can't bring in the revenue required to properly fund schools, therefore exacerbating many conditions that some people would find to be "unfavorable." Aside from that, parental involvement, outside influences, and a lack of extracurricular activities (again, due to a lack of SD funding) are all factors that lead to the perception that an area has "bad schools."

IMO, the Philadelphia School District is heading in a positive direction. Julia R. Masterman is already the #1 ranked HS in PA (#43 in the nation), while Central, Franklin Towne, MaST, Tacony Academy, and other public high schools also rank favorably. McCall, Penn Alexander, Adaire, and others are great examples of quality elementary and middle schools in the city. Even schools that don't rank as favorably as the others, such as Roxborough and Northeast HS, have AP and honors courses. I'm 23 and a while away from having kids of my own, but I wouldn't have a problem sending them to city schools if the future wife and I decide to live in Spruce Hill, Queen Village, Northern Liberties/Fishtown, and certain other neighborhoods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 02:25 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,172 posts, read 4,732,703 times
Reputation: 2444
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan2013 View Post
There's one huge component that often gets overlooked when it comes to discussions about the Philly SD: the part that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania plays in it. Across PA, urban and rural SDs--which typically host a larger number of students living in poverty--are underfunded compared to suburban SDs. This is due to how SD funding is linked to the property taxes that a SD can collect. Districts that host a larger number of students on the lower end of the socioeconomic continuum often can't bring in the revenue required to properly fund schools, therefore exacerbating many conditions that some people would find to be "unfavorable." Aside from that, parental involvement, outside influences, and a lack of extracurricular activities (again, due to a lack of SD funding) are all factors that lead to the perception that an area has "bad schools."

IMO, the Philadelphia School District is heading in a positive direction. Julia R. Masterman is already the #1 ranked HS in PA (#43 in the nation), while Central, Franklin Towne, MaST, Tacony Academy, and other public high schools also rank favorably. McCall, Penn Alexander, Adaire, and others are great examples of quality elementary and middle schools in the city. Even schools that don't rank as favorably as the others, such as Roxborough and Northeast HS, have AP and honors courses. I'm 23 and a while away from having kids of my own, but I wouldn't have a problem sending them to city schools if the future wife and I decide to live in Spruce Hill, Queen Village, Northern Liberties/Fishtown, and certain other neighborhoods.
You make some valid points about the Commonwealth, but the PSD is far from good, or even solid, so it's not an issue of perception. The schools you mentioned are largely outliers.
Its often a very tough decision for many parents who enjoy the city life but want the best for their children, and 9 time out of 10, the suburban schools are the answer. If I had children, I would not want them in Philadelphia Public Schools (minus a few), and I don't think I, or anyone should be chastised for that viewpoint.

Just trying to show you the other side of the argument.

There is hope for the PSD (partially what the soda tax is for), but I think we are at least a decade away from having any sort of sustainable improvements on a large scale.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,128 posts, read 2,001,554 times
Reputation: 2602
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan2013 View Post

IMO, the Philadelphia School District is heading in a positive direction. Julia R. Masterman is already the #1 ranked HS in PA (#43 in the nation), while Central, Franklin Towne, MaST, Tacony Academy, and other public high schools also rank favorably. McCall, Penn Alexander, Adaire, and others are great examples of quality elementary and middle schools in the city. Even schools that don't rank as favorably as the others, such as Roxborough and Northeast HS, have AP and honors courses. I'm 23 and a while away from having kids of my own, but I wouldn't have a problem sending them to city schools if the future wife and I decide to live in Spruce Hill, Queen Village, Northern Liberties/Fishtown, and certain other neighborhoods.
Aren't some or all of the three schools I boldfaced public charters?

On your list of great quality elementary and middle schools, you left off the other school besides Penn Alexander whose district parents kill to get into: William T. Meredith.

But you might also be interested in the anecdotes I collect in a mental file labeled "The Philadelphia public schools aren't as bad as everyone says they are."

The anecdotes come from parents of children in public schools that don't rate as highly as these, such as Andrew Jackson in East Passyunk or Lingelbach on the Germantown/Mt. Airy border.

The stories I heard from parents of children in those schools provide anecdotal ammo for that small but growing body of research that finds that public schools are as good (or as bad) as the parents who decide to enroll their children in them make them. (And that kids from "good" families can do quite well in "bad" schools.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 02:50 PM
 
Location: The mountain of Airy
5,212 posts, read 5,127,876 times
Reputation: 3464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fireshaker View Post
CH and Mount Airy were two areas I thought of immediately. Far Northeast, too.

The "good" city schools weren't always good. It took pioneering parents to say, "You know what? We're going to stay and make this work." And from that sprung some of the best rated schools we have today. Problem is, people usually want the "perfect" school today, instead of settling on a "good" school and working to make it better.
As a parent myself, the question isn't so much of wanting a good school to be perfect. It's wanting a school to be baseline decent, so you can be somewhat assured that the investment into your child (which is a big risk) will be the right investment. Especially if you have more than one child. For example, I would be very willing to invest in a school that's sitting around a 5 and showing some improvement (or even staying the same). But a school that's ranking as a 2 or a 3 is too much risk.

Any "pioneering parent" has had to live the life and be really involved. And in the end, risk is there for them and their child. The risk of your child being behind when they go to high school, take exams or go to college is a scary one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 04:56 PM
 
945 posts, read 2,281,199 times
Reputation: 522
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
As a parent myself, the question isn't so much of wanting a good school to be perfect. It's wanting a school to be baseline decent, so you can be somewhat assured that the investment into your child (which is a big risk) will be the right investment. Especially if you have more than one child. For example, I would be very willing to invest in a school that's sitting around a 5 and showing some improvement (or even staying the same). But a school that's ranking as a 2 or a 3 is too much risk.

Any "pioneering parent" has had to live the life and be really involved. And in the end, risk is there for them and their child. The risk of your child being behind when they go to high school, take exams or go to college is a scary one.

I used to live in Delaware County and moved to Minnesota for my job. Been looking to move back, but the bad schools are not helping. For me, I have sent my child to a low ranked school and a top ranked school. The difference are so noticeable. The amount of homework, the type of students in class, accountability. My main problem with public schools is that they are basically babysitters. They aren't CHALLENGING students. just doing the bare minimum. As a parent, there's only so much you can do. And let's say your child is excelling. Then it becomes well this school is too easy for my child
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
999 posts, read 571,989 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by daboywonder2002 View Post
My main problem with public schools is that they are basically babysitters. They aren't CHALLENGING students. just doing the bare minimum. As a parent, there's only so much you can do. And let's say your child is excelling. Then it becomes well this school is too easy for my child
My main problem with this is that you don't know what you're talking about. If you truly think all public schools do is babysit and never present kids challenging work, come spend a day with me, a public teacher. Stop parroting ridiculous talking points.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 08:36 PM
 
150 posts, read 85,609 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fireshaker View Post
The "good" city schools weren't always good. It took pioneering parents to say, "You know what? We're going to stay and make this work." And from that sprung some of the best rated schools we have today. Problem is, people usually want the "perfect" school today, instead of settling on a "good" school and working to make it better.
^This. My neighborhood public elementary schools (Manayunk/Roxborough) are heavily supported by the parents and community, and as such their reputation is better than other public schools in the area. I've spoken to a teacher at one of the schools who has all the necessary supplies for all of her kids largely due to parent fundraising. The ratings online aren't everything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 08:56 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,172 posts, read 4,732,703 times
Reputation: 2444
Quote:
Originally Posted by daboywonder2002 View Post
I used to live in Delaware County and moved to Minnesota for my job. Been looking to move back, but the bad schools are not helping. For me, I have sent my child to a low ranked school and a top ranked school. The difference are so noticeable. The amount of homework, the type of students in class, accountability. My main problem with public schools is that they are basically babysitters. They aren't CHALLENGING students. just doing the bare minimum. As a parent, there's only so much you can do. And let's say your child is excelling. Then it becomes well this school is too easy for my child
I can almost guarantee that virtually every public school district in Delaware County is superior to virtually any private school and superior to those in Minnesota. Where exactly were you located? Chester?

The Philadelphia suburbs are nationally known for their top notch public school districts. Claiming that public schools teachers are babysitters is one of the most ridiculous statement I have heard on city-data, and I have seen some bad one.

P.S. I am graduate of Penncrest High School in Delaware County and I turned out pretty well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top