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Old 02-11-2019, 05:06 PM
 
67 posts, read 29,666 times
Reputation: 44

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So I've spent a few days here and already like it. I currently live in Boston, really Somerville. I live in a 500 sq. ft. 4th floor (top corner) apartment with a decent view, although of nothing in particular. The apartment building was built in 1920s and has a bust of Charles Lindberg on the front, to give an idea of the age of the the place.

I'm paying about $1,800 a month, including heat, water, sewage. Electricity and gas are extra, about $50/mo. There's a W/D in the basement, no A/C in the unit and no dishwasher (which I don't miss). I'm about 5 minutes walk from the Davis Square subway/T stop in Somerville, which is nice, because Boston proper is about 25-30 minute subway ride. I pay around $150/mo for groceries for 1 person, a little organic but mostly whatever is cheapest. The subway costs $85.50/mo for unlimited, but is slated to go up 5% in the coming months. I have no car. I enjoy the area farmers market's when they're available in spring/summer/fall.

How much would living in different parts of downtown Philadelphia set me back?

Thank you!

(I made it out to the Terminal today, but so late some vendors had left for the day, One Liberty for the view, and the Mint.)
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Old 02-12-2019, 08:23 AM
 
Location: New York City
5,200 posts, read 4,757,769 times
Reputation: 2462
Groceries, food, drink, transit, etc. is more of less the same between the two cities. The big difference is the cost of renting / buying.

If you have an $1800 budget you could live in a nice studio / 1 bedroom almost anywhere in the city. Certain buildings (newer or highrises) in the best parts of the city run in the $2500-3000 range, but $3000 for a 1 bedroom is the upper limit.

So basically your $1800 will take you a lot further in Philadelphia, and its a cooler city
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Old 02-12-2019, 08:49 AM
 
Location: The City
22,141 posts, read 31,407,776 times
Reputation: 7611
1800 will go a longer way in Philly


What type of place do you want?


If you wander out of the core just a bit you can get a lot more for your money; for example a place like Bella Vista might offer a decent 1BR for 1200 whereas buildings in center city proper might be closer to 1800 for a studio; likely more amentities than the 1800 in Somerville




What type of neighborhood/vibe are you looking for


Thanks for bringing some winter down from Boston
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
963 posts, read 492,044 times
Reputation: 1021
You mentioned you were staying in Rittenhouse. 1800 affords a nicer apartment in Philadelphia than you have now in Sommerville, which is not in the city and takes you 30 mins to commute to Boston proper via subway.

You could live 1 block from Rittenhouse Square (literally right on beautiful Spruce St.) and live in the middle of the 2nd largest downtown in the nation and one of the most walkable cities in the nation. No need for a SEPTA pass.

Also Philadelphia has alot more edge than Boston. Glad you are enjoying!

Fun Fact: More people are moving from NYC to Philadelphia than Philadelphia to NYC.

NYC real estate market I get. But I have always thought that Boston and DC lately are overpriced for what they offer. I would live in neither.

Congratulations. You have discovered America's best kept secret. Its birthplace. Philadelphia.
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Old 02-12-2019, 08:55 PM
 
8,662 posts, read 4,753,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
You mentioned you were staying in Rittenhouse. 1800 affords a nicer apartment in Philadelphia than you have now in Sommerville, which is not in the city and takes you 30 mins to commute to Boston proper via subway.

You could live 1 block from Rittenhouse Square (literally right on beautiful Spruce St.) and live in the middle of the 2nd largest downtown in the nation and one of the most walkable cities in the nation. No need for a SEPTA pass.

Also Philadelphia has alot more edge than Boston. Glad you are enjoying!

Fun Fact: More people are moving from NYC to Philadelphia than Philadelphia to NYC.

NYC real estate market I get. But I have always thought that Boston and DC lately are overpriced for what they offer. I would live in neither.

Congratulations. You have discovered America's best kept secret. Its birthplace. Philadelphia.
Tbh, I don't think Phila. is that much of a secret anymore.
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Old 02-13-2019, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,181 posts, read 2,025,175 times
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30-minute commute from Davis Square to Downtown Boston via subway?

The trains must have gotten real slow since I last visited.

The signs atop Harvard Square station when that was the terminus of the Red Line advertised "8 Minutes to Park St.", and that was indeed how long it took to make the four-station journey.

Davis Square is the second station past Harvard Square on the Red Line extension. I know Harvard-Porter is longer than Harvard-Central, and Porter-Davis about as long as Harvard-Porter, but not so much longer that it takes 17 minutes to traverse the distance between those three stations.

And sure enough, a schedule check on the MBTA website shows that it takes 6 minutes to get from Harvard to Davis.

I think 15, 20 at the outside, minutes is more like it.

Living in Center City Philadelphia, you probably won't be taking the subway unless you live in, say, Old City and work in University City. (I took the trolley subway - color-coded green, like in Boston - from my home in Washington Square West to the Penn campus when I lived at 12th and Locust; when I lived near 12th and Pine, I took the Route 40 bus along Lombard Street westbound and South Street eastbound.) You will be doing more walking - ISTR that the last time I saw stats on this, about 30 percent of Center City residents walked to their jobs, one of the highest walking mode shares for any downtown in the country - and taking the surface buses if the weather is lousy. (And if your home and your workplace are close enough together, you will be walking even if the weather is lousy.)
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Old 02-13-2019, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
963 posts, read 492,044 times
Reputation: 1021
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Tbh, I don't think Phila. is that much of a secret anymore.

It is gaining popularity. But I don't think word is fully out or we have fully shed some of our negative connotations.

While we have gotten plenty of positive press coverage. Nationwide I would not say Philadelphia has reached the 'hot' city trend that Portland and Austin and Denver for example share, where its the hip place to go and see and live.

Mostly we are seeing a regional northeast realization of the city IMO.

(Even though we are most certainly better than the 'hot cities' mentioned) - Philly bluntness is real
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Old Yesterday, 07:14 PM
 
67 posts, read 29,666 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
30-minute commute from Davis Square to Downtown Boston via subway?

The trains must have gotten real slow since I last visited.

The signs atop Harvard Square station when that was the terminus of the Red Line advertised "8 Minutes to Park St.", and that was indeed how long it took to make the four-station journey.

Davis Square is the second station past Harvard Square on the Red Line extension. I know Harvard-Porter is longer than Harvard-Central, and Porter-Davis about as long as Harvard-Porter, but not so much longer that it takes 17 minutes to traverse the distance between those three stations.

And sure enough, a schedule check on the MBTA website shows that it takes 6 minutes to get from Harvard to Davis.

I think 15, 20 at the outside, minutes is more like it.
Fair enough.

I'm including time to walk to the station, walk from Park or Downtown Crossing to my destination, and waiting for the train to arrive. I timed my commute to State St and Washington and it ran around 35 minutes from home to office.
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Old Today, 04:33 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,181 posts, read 2,025,175 times
Reputation: 2641
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb885 View Post
Fair enough.

I'm including time to walk to the station, walk from Park or Downtown Crossing to my destination, and waiting for the train to arrive. I timed my commute to State St and Washington and it ran around 35 minutes from home to office.
Oh, okay. That figure also makes sense.
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