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Old 03-06-2019, 03:54 PM
 
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This January, I just moved into the philly neighborhood and into a row house and wondering how well can you hear your neighbors? How loud or quiet they are? It's my first time living next to someone side by side. I'm used to having noise come from below or upstairs from living in an apartment and am trying to get used to it coming from right next to my wall, especially in my room. Mostly when I'm in the living room, the first floor, I don't hear much but when I stay in my room and my neighbors are talking or moving things around I can hear it making me wonder well if I can hear them they can surely hear me. I'm more of a quiet/private person so I feel like I have to walk around, move things or do anything silently because they'll hear me. (it's also because I feel like I'm used to banging sounds and sometimes when neighbors yell or party that's when I usually can really hear them but with the row-house I can hear their conversations even when they aren't being that loud, which makes it uncomfortable when I think about how they can hear me). Do you interact with your next door neighbors? I have one neighbor who is practically super silent but the other that sounds like they are always slamming their drawers at times. Also, this is going to be a weird question, but can you hear your neighbors make sounds on their mattress? I ask because I'm in the smaller room with no space for a desk so I'm mainly doing my homework, reading, typing on my bed and sometimes when I'm typing, which is sometimes late at night, I'm typing really fast and then I hear bang sounds come from my neighbor as if they are trying to tell me to be quiet. My bed doesn't make squeak sounds but it sometimes makes a crunch kind of sound only when I really 'dig' deep into the bed like if were to step on the bed with some of my weight. So it's made me some what self conscious of whether or not they can hear my bed makes. Also I'm not sure but I do hear noises that are similar to someone going on to a mattress or coach from their side which again makes me wonder if they can hear mine (It has happened on more than one occasion and the bang noises they make are really loud, not just slamming the drawers but loud enough that it shakes my room a bit. I haven't had any interactions with them and they haven't approached me about it so I'm wondering if this is a passive aggressive thing they're doing or I'm just overthinking and they're just doing their own thing and its just coincidence, it's also an odd question to bring up to a neighbor I don't know, you know... talk about awkward) Some examples would be nice of the type of noise you guys experience (like can you hear their T.V, talking on the phone, music, walking up and down the stairs, at times I can hear them cough) and the type of neighbors you guys have (like older/elderly people, young couples, families that have kids) so I can get a better picture of if this is just the norm and have some getting used to, to do. (also any suggestions to minimize the sound coming from the neighbors side? like sound proofing) The one neighbor that is making a lot of banging sounds, sounds like they have kids that don't go to school and these are small kids like they are in middle school and there are times when they makes so much banging sounds at the middle of the night that it kinda gets to me.

Side note: I'm a renter and am wondering if the banging noise gets too bad, am I allowed to ask the landlord to do something about it? like add more drywall/insulation or whatever to reduce the sounds) but I know that the noisy neighbors aren't.

Last edited by Mayflower012; 03-06-2019 at 04:21 PM..
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Old 03-06-2019, 05:06 PM
 
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It completely depends on the rowhouse. The older row houses have brick and mortar for firewalls, but any missing mortar could create a scenario where you are hearing every little thing. I have personally had it happen in two different row homes. And it really sucks.

Newer row homes may not be better depending on the materials used. In some ways, apartments are better, but it also sucks to live below people. Either way, I'm not sure you will get much resolution with people banging around. Whether they are doing it on purpose or not, people are rarely understanding or considerate when confronted. Your best bet would be to make friends and then mention it to them with the hopes that they will adjust accordingly. Good luck.
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Old 12-01-2019, 07:30 PM
 
108 posts, read 5,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
It completely depends on the rowhouse. The older row houses have brick and mortar for firewalls, but any missing mortar could create a scenario where you are hearing every little thing. I have personally had it happen in two different row homes. And it really sucks.

Newer row homes may not be better depending on the materials used. In some ways, apartments are better, but it also sucks to live below people. Either way, I'm not sure you will get much resolution with people banging around. Whether they are doing it on purpose or not, people are rarely understanding or considerate when confronted. Your best bet would be to make friends and then mention it to them with the hopes that they will adjust accordingly. Good luck.
This REALLY baffles me not for row homes specifically, but for apartment complexes as well. For some reason, landlords are shying away from adding carpeting to units (I heard it was due to replacement costs), and as a result, newer units are worse than older units when it comes to noise insulation. It's as if they took all of the gripes tenants had about apartments and decided to make the situation even worse!!!

Anything to save a buck I guess.
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Old 12-04-2019, 05:03 AM
 
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I hardly ever, ever hear my neighbors.

But then again, who are your neighbors? An elderly couple? A family with kinds bouncing balls on the floor and walls? A single couple, no kids? A house/apt with four roommates?
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Old 12-04-2019, 03:09 PM
 
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Who are your neighbor, millennial or older people?

We used to live in a row house, on left millennial with few little kids and on right older folks.
You wont hear a thing from right side but from left side, very noisy with little kids jumping running around the house.
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Old 12-04-2019, 03:27 PM
 
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I have lived in four different rowhomes in philadelphia. Two in south philly and two in Mt. Airy. My current house and the two south philly houses I could never hear anything save for some noise if there was construction. However, my first Mt. Airy house was an absolute nightmare in terms of noise. It got so bad I put white noise machines to try and drown out the sound. Who your neighbors are is probably the single most important factor. When I bought my current house I spied on the block probably 3 times of a day at varying times to make sure I was not looking at a repeat situation. I strongly recommend learning about your neighbors.
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Old 12-04-2019, 10:22 PM
 
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OMG a thread on row-houses. I suggest the OP find a LOFT. A old industrial building converted. Philly has some.Chicago has a lot. Greater soundproof residences ......
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Old Yesterday, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Our friend lived in four and none of them were loud.
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Old Yesterday, 08:37 AM
 
595 posts, read 281,049 times
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Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
OMG a thread on row-houses. I suggest the OP find a LOFT. A old industrial building converted. Philly has some.Chicago has a lot. Greater soundproof residences ......
I live in one of the lofts you suggest.

They are generally not made to be residences and the developers who convert them usually give NO effort to reduce noise from one unit to the other - they make them look nice and they're outta there. Some of our walls are made out of 2x3s. So you have issues with noise all the time. If you're on a middle floor, you hear the footfall and bass frequencies from upstairs. Then you get your downstairs neighbors complaining to the board about you and your bass frequencies and footfall (several of the owners in our building are pushing to make it a fine-able offense to wear shoes in your unit). I know this because I am the head of the Board and hear this all the time - it's constant. I lucked out. I'm on the first floor - so I don't have to worry about pissing anyone off downstairs. And only one of the two units above me creates much noise. If the other unit moves and kids move in there? Who knows.

I love our loft. It's huge and beautiful but the uncertainty of the neighbor situation has me thinking that this won't be forever. Most if not all of the converted warehouse lofts I've seen have similar issues.

The moral of the story....unless you're in a completely detached home, you're gonna deal with some kind of noise.
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Old Yesterday, 10:14 AM
 
570 posts, read 410,169 times
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Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
I live in one of the lofts you suggest.

They are generally not made to be residences and the developers who convert them usually give NO effort to reduce noise from one unit to the other - they make them look nice and they're outta there. Some of our walls are made out of 2x3s. So you have issues with noise all the time. If you're on a middle floor, you hear the footfall and bass frequencies from upstairs. Then you get your downstairs neighbors complaining to the board about you and your bass frequencies and footfall (several of the owners in our building are pushing to make it a fine-able offense to wear shoes in your unit). I know this because I am the head of the Board and hear this all the time - it's constant. I lucked out. I'm on the first floor - so I don't have to worry about pissing anyone off downstairs. And only one of the two units above me creates much noise. If the other unit moves and kids move in there? Who knows.

I love our loft. It's huge and beautiful but the uncertainty of the neighbor situation has me thinking that this won't be forever. Most if not all of the converted warehouse lofts I've seen have similar issues.

The moral of the story....unless you're in a completely detached home, you're gonna deal with some kind of noise.
You beat me to it Redddog. My experiences exactly. While the exterior walls from these loft factory conversations are usually thick concrete, the inside is frequently cut into units with cheap drywall and minimal to no insulation. When I lived in one of the hot Northern Liberties conversations, I could frequently hear my neighbors crack open sodas, open kitchen drawers (not even connected to my unit wall), even discuss their days in normal conversational tone. Add to that the noise that comes from the heating and cooling. It's usually a large ceiling-hanging system that cause quite a bit of noise, forcing people to crank their TVs, music, conversations up a bit. It's a tough situation unless you get the perfectly-located unit and/or the perfect neighbors as Redddog mentions above.

My rowhome experiences in contrast, have been better - not perfect by any means, but substantially better. Most rowhomes' first floors' party walls are solid brick, so you're not getting much noise coming through the living room and kitchen where most of the louder living happens. It's the upper floors (bedrooms usually) that sometimes have suspect insulation and just drywall separating them. Again, most of it depends on your neighbors, but even in my worst experience (like a party next door), I slept on my couch on the first floor. At least i could escape the noise in my own house unlike the loft experiences I've had...
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