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Old 07-05-2019, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,928 posts, read 8,000,610 times
Reputation: 9688

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One big difference is that Philly itself is a “major league” city with its own identity as a stand-alone urban center. It has first tier offering in the arts, media, cultural, entertainment and sports amenities. It doesn’t sit in Manhattan’s shadow.
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Old 07-05-2019, 01:26 PM
 
Location: The Left Toast
1,220 posts, read 1,485,474 times
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https://www.visitphilly.com/

They're two very different places in their entireties with a few similarities. My suggestion is to look up things on the Visit Philly link and book a hotel from Thursday morning through Sunday evening. That way you can have a chance to intermingle with the locals during a couple of workdays as well as the weekend.

Ride the trains and buses out to a few areas, Look around, grab a bite, take in an event or two, etc;. That'll give you a slice of the city's flow during the summer months anyway.

If a poster named Dave pa starts typing., take what he says with a grain of rice. During his rant, the conversation will go from Philadelphia to Chicago, and then houses versus alleys... Yep.
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Old 07-05-2019, 03:20 PM
 
103 posts, read 39,937 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
It's okay to make comparisons. Kinda natural. But, I hope, you understand now that making those comparisons robs Phila. of its own history and identity.
That wasn't my intention with the initial question. I just was wondering if Philly has a similar vibe to Bk.
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Old 07-05-2019, 03:22 PM
 
583 posts, read 275,668 times
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I think it's totally natural for a NYer to try and get perspective vs what they know. It's only natural. Let's face it, NY is a unique city and moving from it (especially when you love it) can be hard to imagine. I know. I've done it. We had the experience that we were able to see Philly before we moved and were able to see for ourselves.

I think it's being overly touchy to take offense to the question. People are just looking for perspective, not to strip Philly of it's own identity. They want to know where to look to live and what to expect when they get here. They are two extremely different cities with several things in common.

But I would say that most NYers think about all other East Coast cities in terms of NY. Not just Philly.
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Old 07-05-2019, 03:23 PM
 
583 posts, read 275,668 times
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I would say that Philly does have a similar vibe to Brook. Yes.
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Old 07-05-2019, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
226 posts, read 68,273 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenses & Lights. View Post
https://www.visitphilly.com/

My suggestion is to look up things on the Visit Philly link and book a hotel from Thursday morning through Sunday evening. That way you can have a chance to intermingle with the locals during a couple of workdays as well as the weekend.

Ride the trains and buses out to a few areas, Look around, grab a bite, take in an event or two, etc;.
What he said. Try it out and see how it feels. It will never be just like Brooklyn but if you experience it for yourself you can tell whether it's for you. CD posters can give you a taste but seeing is believing.
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Old 07-05-2019, 08:10 PM
 
9,932 posts, read 5,631,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
I think it's totally natural for a NYer to try and get perspective vs what they know. It's only natural. Let's face it, NY is a unique city and moving from it (especially when you love it) can be hard to imagine. I know. I've done it. We had the experience that we were able to see Philly before we moved and were able to see for ourselves.

I think it's being overly touchy to take offense to the question. People are just looking for perspective, not to strip Philly of it's own identity. They want to know where to look to live and what to expect when they get here. They are two extremely different cities with several things in common.

But I would say that most NYers think about all other East Coast cities in terms of NY. Not just Philly.
You weren't in the city for the "6th Borough" description of Philadelphia which got a bit of traction. So some ex-NYers, at least at the time, did not care at all about Philly's own identity. They wanted to duplicate what they left in NY but at a cheaper price.
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Old 07-06-2019, 11:47 AM
 
832 posts, read 709,696 times
Reputation: 988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patmcpsu View Post
As others said, there is a lot of nuance and variation. But keeping things general, here's my summation (except everything in Philly is on a MUCH smaller scale):
  • North Philly is like the Bronx
  • West Philly is like Harlem (while Harlem's gentrification was still in its infancy) - Think of University City in West Philly as Columbia is in Harlem.
  • Center City is like Manhattan - But with less bankers and filthy rich people
  • South Philly, Fishtown, Northern Liberties, and Manayunk are like Brooklyn - However, the architecture isn't as cute
  • Philly's Northern Suburbs are like Queens, Staten Island (and NJ)
  • Philly's Western Suburbs are like Connecticut and Westchester County (and NJ)
  • Philly also has suburbs stretching into NJ, but they always seemed "foreign".
Close. I would actually say the Queens comparison best suits Northeast Philly due to both of them feeling more suburban in nature in many (but not all) parts...and the Jewish population, even if NE Philly’s Jewish population isn’t what it used to be.

I’d give South Philly more of a Staten Island comparison, with the Italian culture. You could also make those Bronx comparisons a la the sports stadiums and also Bronx’s Little Italy around Arthur Avenue. Understood that the northernmost part of South Philly around South Street could be seen as more Brooklyn-ish, but in my opinion, only that part.

Southwest Philly could also be considered Bronx-ish in the same way North Philly is.
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Old 07-06-2019, 02:07 PM
 
4,215 posts, read 1,556,090 times
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Harlem reminds of North Broad Street
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Old 07-06-2019, 04:04 PM
 
9,932 posts, read 5,631,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moneymkt View Post
Harlem reminds of North Broad Street
Lol. There are multi-million dollar homes in Harlem. So, no....
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