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Old 08-11-2019, 10:49 AM
 
9,956 posts, read 5,652,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
I don't know why New York isn't held in the same regard. It's arguably more historical than either one. And if you would say it doesn't really matter because New York isn't known as much for it's history as its present, then I would say I hope Boston's seen as more historical. Philly is too great and modern of a city to be known only for it's history.

Believe it or not I pretty much agree with you.

It truly bothers me that Philadelphia is known mostly for, what are, a very few years in its history in the late 18th century.

There was a recent poster who visited and primarily stayed in Old City. He raved about it and wanted to see more. We gave him suggestions like Laurel Hill Cemetery and Chestnut Hill. He rejected or ignored those places.. Both of those places are examples of the city's prosperity during the Victorian/Edwardian eras. But too many tourists just have one focus about Philadelphia and that's a shame.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Read up on the Revolutionary War. The boroughs that became NYC were Tory strongholds.

After WWII the decision to salvage Society Hill was made. Strict zoning laws got the job done, privately.

City Hall made the decision to push for tourists as the mills closed down and other businesses failed to come in and take up the slack.

The major push for tourists, or rather the quantity we have now, is fairly recent, imo. I'd say from the mid-90s. The Bicentennial was a bust as I'm sure you remember.
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Old 08-11-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
22,653 posts, read 27,995,791 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
The major push for tourists, or rather the quantity we have now, is fairly recent, imo. I'd say from the mid-90s. The Bicentennial was a bust as I'm sure you remember.
Very true. Using Philadelphia as locations in movies has pushed the tourism button, but it started shortly after the Bicentennial bust with Rocky. The tourism board suppliments the location interest with the historical sites.

Has the Civil War museum moved back to Center City? I'm posting from my phone rIght now, so data is an issue.
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Old 08-11-2019, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Read up on the Revolutionary War. The boroughs that became NYC were Tory strongholds.

After WWII the decision to salvage Society Hill was made. Strict zoning laws got the job done, privately.

City Hall made the decision to push for tourists as the mills closed down and other businesses failed to come in and take up the slack.
The Society Hill urban renewal project was a public-private partnership.

Public in that the city made streetscape improvements (take a look at the junction box plates on the Franklin light replicas in that neighborhood; they read "Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority - 1965") and also did the surgical (as opposed to wholesale, as in most other cities) demolition of derelict (and "derelict") properties.

Then private developers came in to do the rebuilding in accordance with those strict rules you mention. (Note, however, that they were permissive as far as architectural style was concerned; this kept Society Hill from becoming another Colonial Williamsburg-style historical-theme-park district.)

It was the uniqueness of both the public-private partnership and the surgical demolition that landed Society Hill renewal plan architect Ed Bacon on the cover of Time in 1966.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Believe it or not I pretty much agree with you.

It truly bothers me that Philadelphia is known mostly for, what are, a very few years in its history in the late 18th century.

There was a recent poster who visited and primarily stayed in Old City. He raved about it and wanted to see more. We gave him suggestions like Laurel Hill Cemetery and Chestnut Hill. He rejected or ignored those places.. Both of those places are examples of the city's prosperity during the Victorian/Edwardian eras. But too many tourists just have one focus about Philadelphia and that's a shame.
Chestnut Hill remains prosperous today. The trouble is, the kind of history you learn by visiting it is the kind that's a hard sell to most tourists.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:22 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
22,653 posts, read 27,995,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
The Society Hill urban renewal project was a public-private partnership.

Public in that the city made streetscape improvements (take a look at the junction box plates on the Franklin light replicas in that neighborhood; they read "Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority - 1965") and also did the surgical (as opposed to wholesale, as in most other cities) demolition of derelict (and "derelict") properties.

Then private developers came in to do the rebuilding in accordance with those strict rules you mention. (Note, however, that they were permissive as far as architectural style was concerned; this kept Society Hill from becoming another Colonial Williamsburg-style historical-theme-park district.)

It was the uniqueness of both the public-private partnership and the surgical demolition that landed Society Hill renewal plan architect Ed Bacon on the cover of Time in 1966.



Chestnut Hill remains prosperous today. The trouble is, the kind of history you learn by visiting it is the kind that's a hard sell to most tourists.
I remember that the properties that were torn down in Society Hill had to be unsound structurally and the replacements had to blend in. When I was in college at Philadelphia College of Art, from '69 - '73, they were still working on Society Hill and the rehabbing was bleeding over into Queen Village. We'd walk around and watch the various stages, between classes.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
I remember that the properties that were torn down in Society Hill had to be unsound structurally and the replacements had to blend in. When I was in college at Philadelphia College of Art, from '69 - '73, they were still working on Society Hill and the rehabbing was bleeding over into Queen Village. We'd walk around and watch the various stages, between classes.
But they didn't need to be the same architectural style as the houses around them: you will find contemporary houses interspersed among Colonial and Federal houses on several Society Hill blocks, not to mention the frankly modernist Towers and neighboring Bingham Court.

That's what I meant when I said the Society Hill project avoided turning the neighborhood into a "Colonial Williamsburg-style historical theme park."
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:36 PM
 
9,956 posts, read 5,652,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Very true. Using Philadelphia as locations in movies has pushed the tourism button, but it started shortly after the Bicentennial bust with Rocky. The tourism board suppliments the location interest with the historical sites.

Has the Civil War museum moved back to Center City? I'm posting from my phone rIght now, so data is an issue.
No, the Civil War Museum did not move back.

In any case there is an exhibit about the Civil War at the Mutter Museum right now.
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Old 08-11-2019, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
538 posts, read 216,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNgFooCj View Post
I don't know why New York isn't held in the same regard. It's arguably more historical than either one. And if you would say it doesn't really matter because New York isn't known as much for it's history as its present, then I would say I hope Boston's seen as more historical. Philly is too great and modern of a city to be known only for it's history.

Care to elaborate? There is both the NY/NJ campaign and Philadelphia campaign as major series of battles. However, it is hard to beat Philadelphia as the Patriot capital, home to Constitution Hall and of course the iconic Liberty Bell. I want to know more about how much NYC has preserved its Revolutionary War history.
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Old 08-11-2019, 11:32 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
22,653 posts, read 27,995,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
No, the Civil War Museum did not move back.

In any case there is an exhibit about the Civil War at the Mutter Museum right now.
Thanks

I was always going to go into the Civil War museum, but always chickened out, when they were on Pine St. I think that Baldy's head mounted and hanging off the wall played a part in it.

There was a cavalry regiment from Philadelphia in the western theater.

Last edited by southbound_295; 08-11-2019 at 11:49 PM..
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Old 08-11-2019, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,598 posts, read 2,732,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post

There was a cavalry regiment from Philadelphia in the western theater.
As in, Battle of Westport or Battle of Lexington?

I'd understood both of these to be largely Missouri affairs, though the scale of the Battle of Westport led some Civil War historians to dub it "the Western Gettysburg."
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