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Old 08-12-2019, 12:04 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
22,616 posts, read 27,948,763 times
Reputation: 9302

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
As in, Battle of Westport or Battle of Lexington?

I'd understood both of these to be largely Missouri affairs, though the scale of the Battle of Westport led some Civil War historians to dub it "the Western Gettysburg."
The Philadelphia cavalry regiment that was in the western theater was at Stones River/Murfreesboro in Tennessee with the freshly renamed Army of the Cumberland. The majority of my people who participated in the Civil War were in that army. There were also a couple of Pennsylvania infantry regiments in the Army of the Cumberland. I don't remember if the Philadelphians were at Chickamauga.
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Old 08-12-2019, 09:24 AM
 
9,932 posts, read 5,629,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Thanks

I was always going to go into the Civil War museum, but always chickened out, when they were on Pine St. I think that Baldy's head mounted and hanging off the wall played a part in it.

There was a cavalry regiment from Philadelphia in the western theater.
Meade, along with other Civil War vets, is buried in Laurel Hill. So why don't more history buffs go there? It's fairly easy to get to it.

Gettyburg is fantastic, but Phila., is missing an opportunity wrt this period.

50% of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution owned people. Should I go on caring about those particular individuals?
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:48 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
22,616 posts, read 27,948,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Meade, along with other Civil War vets, is buried in Laurel Hill. So why don't more history buffs go there? It's fairly easy to get to it.

Gettyburg is fantastic, but Phila., is missing an opportunity wrt this period.

50% of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution owned people. Should I go on caring about those particular individuals?
If it bothers you, no. However, I've had this conversation in real life, so I'll have the rest of the conversation with you.

Unmarried, land owning women had the vote in NJ. That meant women who were never married but had inherited land from their father as well as widows. Those women usually were assigned a man to administer the land ownership as women were not considered capable. When the constitution was adopted, the Jersey women were disenfranchised. Married women were legal extensions of their husbands, so no vote for them. Prior to marriage, female children belonged to their fathers, hence the practice of dowries. The father was literally paying off the husband to take the female child off his hands.

When the founding fathers said all men are created equal, they meant it literally, not to include women.

Last edited by southbound_295; 08-12-2019 at 10:56 AM..
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Old 08-12-2019, 12:03 PM
 
9,932 posts, read 5,629,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
If it bothers you, no. However, I've had this conversation in real life, so I'll have the rest of the conversation with you.

Unmarried, land owning women had the vote in NJ. That meant women who were never married but had inherited land from their father as well as widows. Those women usually were assigned a man to administer the land ownership as women were not considered capable. When the constitution was adopted, the Jersey women were disenfranchised. Married women were legal extensions of their husbands, so no vote for them. Prior to marriage, female children belonged to their fathers, hence the practice of dowries. The father was literally paying off the husband to take the female child off his hands.

When the founding fathers said all men are created equal, they meant it literally, not to include women.
Well, I know what they meant. What they didn't realize was how the meaning of those words would change over time and be inclusive in a way they could barely imagine.
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Old 08-12-2019, 12:10 PM
 
Location: USA
20,970 posts, read 9,829,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Well, I know what they meant. What they didn't realize was how the meaning of those words would change over time and be inclusive in a way they could barely imagine.
It is impossible to judge them by today's standard. It would be like saying that they should have been worried about their internet download speed.
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
226 posts, read 68,029 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Well, I know what they meant. What they didn't realize was how the meaning of those words would change over time and be inclusive in a way they could barely imagine.
Well, I have no idea what they meant. If half owned other people as personal property, what did they mean? For that matter, what about "Life, LIBERTY and the pursuit of happiness?"

Last edited by TownDweller; 08-12-2019 at 03:02 PM.. Reason: Further clarification
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