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Old 08-31-2019, 12:31 PM
 
7,194 posts, read 7,602,623 times
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I never used the word "posh." And elite isn't only defined as old stone mansions. And working class isn't only defined by a basketball hoop at a house that's on less than 1/2 acre.

All I said was no part of Ardmore or Bryn Mawr would I personally describe as "the other side of the tracks." That's all.
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,568 posts, read 2,718,902 times
Reputation: 3501
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
I never used the word "posh." And elite isn't only defined as old stone mansions. And working class isn't only defined by a basketball hoop at a house that's on less than 1/2 acre.

All I said was no part of Ardmore or Bryn Mawr would I personally describe as "the other side of the tracks." That's all.
You also said that all of both communities are "fairly exclusive."

I can tell you that's not the case. I've featured houses listing for under $300k in both south Ardmore and that rowhouse pocket of Bryn Mawr.

Relatively speaking, in both physical form and house prices, that would make them "the wrong side of the tracks" if you're status-conscious. The really swell houses all lie north of the Main Line tracks in both Ardmore and Bryn Mawr.

Speaking of working-class, did you know that Ardmore had an auto assembly plant in its downtown from around 1900 until the early 1950s? It was a small manufacturer of trucks called Autocar. The company remains in business today but makes its trucks in Indiana now.
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Old 09-01-2019, 12:55 PM
 
9,935 posts, read 5,638,866 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
I never used the word "posh." And elite isn't only defined as old stone mansions. And working class isn't only defined by a basketball hoop at a house that's on less than 1/2 acre.

All I said was no part of Ardmore or Bryn Mawr would I personally describe as "the other side of the tracks." That's all.
You ignored what I posted. So...whatever...
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Old 09-01-2019, 12:59 PM
 
9,935 posts, read 5,638,866 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
You also said that all of both communities are "fairly exclusive."

I can tell you that's not the case. I've featured houses listing for under $300k in both south Ardmore and that rowhouse pocket of Bryn Mawr.

Relatively speaking, in both physical form and house prices, that would make them "the wrong side of the tracks" if you're status-conscious. The really swell houses all lie north of the Main Line tracks in both Ardmore and Bryn Mawr.

Speaking of working-class, did you know that Ardmore had an auto assembly plant in its downtown from around 1900 until the early 1950s? It was a small manufacturer of trucks called Autocar. The company remains in business today but makes its trucks in Indiana now.
I remember the Autocar company. Or at least I remember knowing of it. The building is still pretty much there, btw.
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Old 09-01-2019, 01:06 PM
 
9,935 posts, read 5,638,866 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
You also said that all of both communities are "fairly exclusive."

I can tell you that's not the case. I've featured houses listing for under $300k in both south Ardmore and that rowhouse pocket of Bryn Mawr.

Relatively speaking, in both physical form and house prices, that would make them "the wrong side of the tracks" if you're status-conscious. The really swell houses all lie north of the Main Line tracks in both Ardmore and Bryn Mawr.

Speaking of working-class, did you know that Ardmore had an auto assembly plant in its downtown from around 1900 until the early 1950s? It was a small manufacturer of trucks called Autocar. The company remains in business today but makes its trucks in Indiana now.
The article says that Autocar made vehicles in SE PA until 1980 when Volvo took over in 1981 to 2001. I wonder where in SE PA.
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:31 PM
 
46 posts, read 85,759 times
Reputation: 133
Havertown is sort of the "it" town lately. Picks up those that cannot look at anything in Lower Merion and are willing to pay for a (usually) small house with rising property taxes, but lots of social capital reminiscent of their suburban childhoods that they are seeking but don't want to admit when they are still living in the city amid their friends that claim they will never live in the 'burbs and drive a minivan.
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:36 PM
 
46 posts, read 85,759 times
Reputation: 133
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Originally Posted by mslhu View Post
An exclusive street in elitist Ardmore: https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0043...7i16384!8i8192


How do these Ardmore-ites live in such poshness? https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0005...7i16384!8i8192
I applaud the sarcasm in this completely true post, above.

Indulge me - off-thread:
I think it may be worth a separate thread, but I have come to believe Ardmore is in many ways reminiscent of Germantown fifty to sixty years ago. Though Germantown has its splendid early American buildings, it and Ardmore have practically the same kinds of homes of all kinds, and a distribution of neighborhood fabrics that accommodated (since its all becoming expensive now I use the past-tense) all income groups from poor to very rich, even the same kinds of 19th and 20th century housing stocks. Sometimes I feel like Ardmore looks like someone took lots of the black-and-white photos of Germantown in the 40s-60s on PhillyHistory.org and put them into present-day Kodachrome. I suppose some will debate this or disagree, but I don't think that it's that far-fetched. The two links to Google from the post above, for example, could be streets in Germantown to some extent now, but especially decades ago before larger swaths of it declined.
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