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Old 08-23-2019, 10:45 AM
 
590 posts, read 436,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TownDweller View Post
Any modern retailer, and certainly Amazon/WFM is one, will employee a multi-variate model to determine new site locations. Income, education, density and many other criteria are used.

It will be interesting to see how Amazon markets their grocery business going forward. WFM may not be their only play in that space. And physical locations are giving up ground in wallet share to delivery services in many retail categories. That includes grocers. Every time I'm in my local WFM I spot shoppers collecting goods for home delivery.

Like other retail categories, expect disruption.
Will be interesting to see how Amazon manages WFM. Since I was wondering just how bad my memory might be ... I did a little searching while on a boring conference call and the one thing I wasn’t mistaken about is the priority WFM placed on college educated people in a trade area pre-Amazon. Here is an example. “The grocer has been known to employ stringent demographic requirements in selecting its locations, in particular seeking store locations in areas with a higher density of college-educated residents.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...?noredirect=on

It turns out the 200k figure is the number of people within a twenty minute drive is the threshold WFM wants for a potential site. Anyway, WFM is unlikely to open a store in the Northwest part of Philadelphia unless it has changed / does change its preferences regarding demographics and real estate.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Midwest
1,277 posts, read 1,851,522 times
Reputation: 965
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
the one being built in southern Mt. Airy on Germantown Avenue will be the first one in this region (and for all I know anywhere else the chain operates in the US) that is neither freestanding nor ringed by a surface parking lot - its parking will be in a garage beneath the store.

This one in a mixed-use development in South Minneapolis, right off of the light rail, goes back over a decade, to before Aldi even has the decent reputation is does today (it does have a pretty big surface lot due to the nature of the larger strip-mall project - built just a little too long ago in too poor of a neighborhood to be built smarter).

https://goo.gl/maps/XVRscY1B3QVDVuwK8

Even though you're a wealth of information, sometimes you let your boosterism get the best of you.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:40 AM
 
590 posts, read 436,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Well, we know that bussing didn't work.
No, we don’t know that. Let’s be clear on some things. Philadelphia never implemented mandatory busing while under a court supervised desegregation order. In fact, most public school students walked to school during the years of court supervision. The district operates a vastly larger busing program now than it ever did prior to the end of court supervision. Most city children are currently bused to school because of the proliferation of charter schools, selective admission public schools, out of catchment enrollment and vouchers. The reason there is no public outcry is because the current busing program isn’t operated to facilitate desegregation. In fact it serves to further segregate previously intensely segregated schools. The public didn’t object to busing. White people objected to mandatory school desegregation.

Busing benefited AA children academically. The academic achievement gap between AA and white children closed most rapidly during the peak desegregation decades of the 1970s and 1980s. There are multiple causes for why the achievement gap has largely ceased closing. However, research is crystal clear that school integration benefits black/brown children and doesn’t academically harm white children.

As always history is written by the victors. In this case that would be the opponents of compulsory school integration. While there was notably strong objection to school desegregation in the Northeast there were other parts of the country that initially took great civic pride in the successful desegregation of their schools. And even notoriously anti-school integration Boston is home to METCO the longest running voluntary desegregation program in the US.

Reagan made a campaign appearance in Charlotte in 1980 that was well-received except for one portion. He started to inveigh against busing (aka school desegregation) and was greeted with dead silence. Like numerous Southern communities Charlotte had great pride in its successfully school integration which included merging the Charlotte City and Mecklenburg County school districts. One legacy of court ordered desegregation is that the South still has the least segregated schools in the US. Unfortunately over time the opponents of school integration were able to capture school desegregation as an issue in the culture wars and white liberals walked away from the issue in the 1990s in the wake of Republican political ascendency. So, nationally, schools are currently as racially segregated as they were prior to 1970.

Given the SCOTUS decision in Milken and the tarnished though inaccurate common understanding of busing as a desegregation strategy it would be foolish to propose busing again to facilitate school desegregation. But make no mistake. Desegregation didn’t fail because of busing. It failed because white people lost the will to make it happen and desegregation will only ever happen in the future if white people decide to regain the will to do so.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,573 posts, read 2,721,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FamousBlueRaincoat View Post
This one in a mixed-use development in South Minneapolis, right off of the light rail, goes back over a decade, to before Aldi even has the decent reputation is does today (it does have a pretty big surface lot due to the nature of the larger strip-mall project - built just a little too long ago in too poor of a neighborhood to be built smarter).

https://goo.gl/maps/XVRscY1B3QVDVuwK8

Even though you're a wealth of information, sometimes you let your boosterism get the best of you.
Okay, mixed-use, but isn't that a surface parking lot next to the store?

I said "neither...nor...." (I also put "for all I know" in parentheses to account for my lack of knowledge here.)

But yes, that store doesn't fit the standard Aldi template either, which goes back decades.

Last edited by MarketStEl; 08-23-2019 at 11:52 AM..
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,573 posts, read 2,721,309 times
Reputation: 3501
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post

It turns out the 200k figure is the number of people within a twenty minute drive is the threshold WFM wants for a potential site. Anyway, WFM is unlikely to open a store in the Northwest part of Philadelphia unless it has changed / does change its preferences regarding demographics and real estate.
I'd assume they'd tweak that radius to account for stores in denser urban locations - like "greater Center City"?

Though I do think that both Center City stores would meet that 200k-residents-within-20-minutes'-travel-time figure, regardless what they used to get to the store.

Thanks in part to the presence of the Wissahickon Valley as a barrier to travel between its two halves, probably not Northwest Philly.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,573 posts, read 2,721,309 times
Reputation: 3501
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
No, we don’t know that. Let’s be clear on some things. Philadelphia never implemented mandatory busing while under a court supervised desegregation order. In fact, most public school students walked to school during the years of court supervision. The district operates a vastly larger busing program now than it ever did prior to the end of court supervision. Most city children are currently bused to school because of the proliferation of charter schools, selective admission public schools, out of catchment enrollment and vouchers. The reason there is no public outcry is because the current busing program isn’t operated to facilitate desegregation. In fact it serves to further segregate previously intensely segregated schools. The public didn’t object to busing. White people objected to mandatory school desegregation.

Busing benefited AA children academically. The academic achievement gap between AA and white children closed most rapidly during the peak desegregation decades of the 1970s and 1980s. There are multiple causes for why the achievement gap has largely ceased closing. However, research is crystal clear that school integration benefits black/brown children and doesn’t academically harm white children.

As always history is written by the victors. In this case that would be the opponents of compulsory school integration. While there was notably strong objection to school desegregation in the Northeast there were other parts of the country that initially took great civic pride in the successful desegregation of their schools. And even notoriously anti-school integration Boston is home to METCO the longest running voluntary desegregation program in the US.

Reagan made a campaign appearance in Charlotte in 1980 that was well-received except for one portion. He started to inveigh against busing (aka school desegregation) and was greeted with dead silence. Like numerous Southern communities Charlotte had great pride in its successfully school integration which included merging the Charlotte City and Mecklenburg County school districts. One legacy of court ordered desegregation is that the South still has the least segregated schools in the US. Unfortunately over time the opponents of school integration were able to capture school desegregation as an issue in the culture wars and white liberals walked away from the issue in the 1990s in the wake of Republican political ascendency. So, nationally, schools are currently as racially segregated as they were prior to 1970.

Given the SCOTUS decision in Milken and the tarnished though inaccurate common understanding of busing as a desegregation strategy it would be foolish to propose busing again to facilitate school desegregation. But make no mistake. Desegregation didn’t fail because of busing. It failed because white people lost the will to make it happen and desegregation will only ever happen in the future if white people decide to regain the will to do so.
*clap clap clap*

It is, however, interesting to note the variance within the South.

You have North Carolina at one end of the spectrum and Mississippi, where "segregation academies" sprouted iike weeds, at the other.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Midwest
1,277 posts, read 1,851,522 times
Reputation: 965
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Okay, mixed-use, but isn't that a surface parking lot next to the store?

I said "neither...nor...."

But yes, that store doesn't fit the standard Aldi template either, which goes back decades.
Yeah, I did address the surface parking lot as being something that probably wouldn't fly in Minneapolis now-a-days (you can go up the block a little to see what they build now). If you take a closer look, you will see that the parking lot is not for Aldi specifically, but a lot for the entire project, which is mostly a strip mall (again, this was built over a decade ago - how long ago exactly, I'm not sure - I always remember it being there).


None-the-less, your statement stood out to me because I remembered shopping at the Aldi on the ground floor of an apartment building in a pretty poor neighborhood of a midwestern city like 15 years ago....


Just meaning that Mt. Airy definitely isn't the first time they've done something different, and I'm guessing with a little bit of searching you can find other examples.


Chicago: https://goo.gl/maps/68kevXduNTGxJeFR7


There are quite a few in malls in NYC boroughs.
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Old 08-23-2019, 12:14 PM
 
590 posts, read 436,109 times
Reputation: 946
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
*clap clap clap*

It is, however, interesting to note the variance within the South.

You have North Carolina at one end of the spectrum and Mississippi, where "segregation academies" sprouted iike weeds, at the other.
True. Hell, Virginia stopped operating public schools for a while in the 1950s to prevent school integration. And schools in the south are segregated too. Just a little less than in the rest of the country. I had a front row seat as a parent from which to watch the suburban Atlanta elementary school my kids attended transition from segregated white to segregated Asian.

Asians are the proof that white families choose schools based on race first and foremost. My neighborhood elementary school was always in the top five in the state in test scores when it was 90% white and it still is now that it’s 90% Asian. Predictably when my kids were students there and the school hit roughly 40% Asian enrollment, the Kindergarten classes started to have a noticeable white kid deficit. It took less than a decade for white families to almost entirely abandon the school.
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Old 08-23-2019, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,573 posts, read 2,721,309 times
Reputation: 3501
Quote:
Originally Posted by FamousBlueRaincoat View Post
Yeah, I did address the surface parking lot as being something that probably wouldn't fly in Minneapolis now-a-days (you can go up the block a little to see what they build now). If you take a closer look, you will see that the parking lot is not for Aldi specifically, but a lot for the entire project, which is mostly a strip mall (again, this was built over a decade ago - how long ago exactly, I'm not sure - I always remember it being there).


None-the-less, your statement stood out to me because I remembered shopping at the Aldi on the ground floor of an apartment building in a pretty poor neighborhood of a midwestern city like 15 years ago....


Just meaning that Mt. Airy definitely isn't the first time they've done something different, and I'm guessing with a little bit of searching you can find other examples.


Chicago: https://goo.gl/maps/68kevXduNTGxJeFR7


There are quite a few in malls in NYC boroughs.
Well, there you go.

So only "the first in this region," nothing more.

But I wonder how often you find an Aldi next to an "Aldi"? I think that's the first time I've seen stores owned by both Aldi companies as next-door neighbors. (And, of course, that's possible only in the US, because Aldi Nord, AFAIK, hasn't exported Trader Joe's as a separate store concept beyond our shores, though you can find Trader Joe's-branded products in Aldi Nord stores abroad.)
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Old 08-23-2019, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,573 posts, read 2,721,309 times
Reputation: 3501
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
True. Hell, Virginia stopped operating public schools for a while in the 1950s to prevent school integration. And schools in the south are segregated too. Just a little less than in the rest of the country. I had a front row seat as a parent from which to watch the suburban Atlanta elementary school my kids attended transition from segregated white to segregated Asian.

Asians are the proof that white families choose schools based on race first and foremost. My neighborhood elementary school was always in the top five in the state in test scores when it was 90% white and it still is now that it’s 90% Asian. Predictably when my kids were students there and the school hit roughly 40% Asian enrollment, the Kindergarten classes started to have a noticeable white kid deficit. It took less than a decade for white families to almost entirely abandon the school.
But this now raises an interesting question:

Why are so many whites so afraid of plain old integration, let alone being in the minority?

I hope that none of this crowd are among those who whine, "What do you mean 'white privilege'?"
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