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View Poll Results: So which fits best as a local. your accepting us of "Philly"
Fine with it if not used as derogatory and see it as not demeaning. 8 21.05%
I never use it. But does not offend me in the least. 3 7.89%
Though overused.... i've come to just accept it. 3 7.89%
i abhor its use and do see it as demeaning. 1 2.63%
I use it myself. I find it a great nick affecianately used by far 17 44.74%
It just gets overused and never should be formally used or replace our Respected Official FULL Name -- as PHILADELPHIA 6 15.79%
Voters: 38. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-17-2019, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
227 posts, read 69,588 times
Reputation: 155

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What's in a name?

Everywhere outside the area, you see Philly Cheesesteak on restaurant menus. I remember the first one I ever had, in Boulder, Colorado. I loved it but it was almost nothing like what you get here. For my money, the ones outside the area are generally poor imitations of what you get here, and very few are made the way they are made here. It's the same with Chicago deep dish pizza.

Philadelphia style cream cheese is a staple with bagels in many places I've been and while "Philadelphia" is commonly omitted, have never heard it called "Philly" style cream cheese.

I've shortened the name many times myself, often telling friends and associates that I have moved to "Philly."

I can see how the shorter version might not be the best option in professional or scientific gatherings, or other more formal situations. "Philly" sounds to my ear informal, possibly blue collar or working class. In the end, I think it's really just a short way to say a four syllable word. Similar to LA or DC. Disrespectful, not at all.

For the record, I'm a transplant. Spent most of my adult life in the Windy City.
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Old 09-17-2019, 05:03 PM
 
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i wouldn't say derogatory but think it sort of de-values an otherwise great city. you don't see people calling New York City Newy.
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Old 09-17-2019, 05:14 PM
 
559 posts, read 405,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MKA1453 View Post
i wouldn't say derogatory but think it sort of de-values an otherwise great city. you don't see people calling New York City Newy.
I don’t think that’s why New York isn’t abbreviated much. New York is two syllables (just like “Philly”) - hard to get shorter than that. Now, once you increase the syllable count to four as in “New York City,” it changes to “NYC” most times. How many times do you really hear “New York City?” I’m in NYC every single week and can’t remember the last time I heard New York City used in conversation.
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Old 09-17-2019, 05:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennsport View Post
I don’t think that’s why New York isn’t abbreviated much. New York is two syllables (just like “Philly”) - hard to get shorter than that. Now, once you increase the syllable count to four as in “New York City,” it changes to “NYC” most times. How many times do you really hear “New York City?” I’m in NYC every single week and can’t remember the last time I heard New York City used in conversation.
you don't hear people say "New York City" because the vast majority use the borough name. It's "Manhattan" or "Brooklyn" or "Bronx" etc. You know when someone isn't from New York City when you hear them call it "NYC"
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Old 09-17-2019, 08:09 PM
 
559 posts, read 405,900 times
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Well that’s true for major cities bc they are vast and people need more exact ways to explain where they live (I.e. neighborhood names like Meatpacking, Flatbush, etc). This is true in Philly as well. Most natives refer to neighborhoods. I for example live in pennsport and would refer to my home as such to any other Philadelphian. In general though, I hear “NYC” or “uptown” or “downtown” or “midtown” or even just “the city” a whole lot more often than I hear “New York City” from both residents and visitors alike. Notice all the aforementioned have two syllables. I really think there is a syllable factor in that people like shortening longer words/phrases.
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Old 09-17-2019, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,576 posts, read 2,725,252 times
Reputation: 3509
Quote:
Originally Posted by TownDweller View Post
What's in a name?

Everywhere outside the area, you see Philly Cheesesteak on restaurant menus. I remember the first one I ever had, in Boulder, Colorado. I loved it but it was almost nothing like what you get here. For my money, the ones outside the area are generally poor imitations of what you get here, and very few are made the way they are made here. It's the same with Chicago deep dish pizza.

Philadelphia style cream cheese is a staple with bagels in many places I've been and while "Philadelphia" is commonly omitted, have never heard it called "Philly" style cream cheese.
(emphasis added)

See my rule of thumb above. And note the two exceptions.

Even more egregious than the "Philly cheesesteak," however, was this place I ate at once in Berkeley, Calif., that said it served "hoagies."

This term for a submarine or hero sandwich is unique to Philadelphia. Legend has it that the name originated from the sandwiches workers at the Hog Island Shipyard ate at lunchtime. (The Hog Island Shipyard was created to build ships for our World War I effort; it didn't build too many for that war, as it opened in 1918. Philadelphia International Airport sits on the site of the shipyard today.)

A sign inside the shop informed patrons that a "hoagie" was a "hot oven toasted sandwich, grinder".

I know there are some places (most notably Wawa) that will toast hoagies for you, but this definition was off base; hoagies are traditionally cold sandwiches, though some varieties, such as meatball, have hot fillings.

Now, on to the cream cheese.

Philadelphia Brand cream cheese is the best-selling brand of cream cheese in the country - and the only brand you can find in all 50 states.

It also has never been made here.

It was created by a farmer in upstate New York in the 1870s - it's a richer and firmer variant on the soft European cheese known as neufchâtel. (This cheese variety you will find next to the cream cheese labeled "1/3 Less Fat.")

The creator gave it the name "Philadelphia" because the city had a reputation for fine cooking. Kraft (National Dairy Products Corporation at the time) bought the Phenix Cheese Company, which made it, in the early 1900s and took it nationwide.

Kraft used to run ads in the 1970s or 1980s that concluded with the tagline "Isn't it silly not to use Philly?" At the time, you would find packages of "Philadelphia" cream cheese with the word "Philly" on their sides. I forget when they stopped this practice.
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Old 09-18-2019, 07:21 AM
 
515 posts, read 229,945 times
Reputation: 548
Quote:
Originally Posted by TownDweller View Post
What's in a name?

Everywhere outside the area, you see Philly Cheesesteak on restaurant menus. I remember the first one I ever had, in Boulder, Colorado. I loved it but it was almost nothing like what you get here. For my money, the ones outside the area are generally poor imitations of what you get here, and very few are made the way they are made here. It's the same with Chicago deep dish pizza.

Philadelphia style cream cheese is a staple with bagels in many places I've been and while "Philadelphia" is commonly omitted, have never heard it called "Philly" style cream cheese.

I've shortened the name many times myself, often telling friends and associates that I have moved to "Philly."

I can see how the shorter version might not be the best option in professional or scientific gatherings, or other more formal situations. "Philly" sounds to my ear informal, possibly blue collar or working class. In the end, I think it's really just a short way to say a four syllable word. Similar to LA or DC. Disrespectful, not at all.

For the record, I'm a transplant. Spent most of my adult life in the Windy City.
Chicago pizza is terrible in Chicago, too. Deep dish is like 5 lbs of half-cooked goo with the sauce on top of the cheese. Thin crust in Chicago is like cardboard with spaghetti sauce cut into squares. If anyone here ever visits Chicago, skip the pizza. There is a lot of great food in Chicago, but what they call "pizza" definitely is not.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:08 AM
 
366 posts, read 137,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewtownBucks View Post
Chicago pizza is terrible in Chicago, too. Deep dish is like 5 lbs of half-cooked goo with the sauce on top of the cheese. Thin crust in Chicago is like cardboard with spaghetti sauce cut into squares. If anyone here ever visits Chicago, skip the pizza. There is a lot of great food in Chicago, but what they call "pizza" definitely is not.
Ouch! I thought it was pretty good when I was there.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:19 AM
 
3,743 posts, read 1,802,781 times
Reputation: 2712
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewtownBucks View Post
Chicago pizza is terrible in Chicago, too. Deep dish is like 5 lbs of half-cooked goo with the sauce on top of the cheese. Thin crust in Chicago is like cardboard with spaghetti sauce cut into squares. If anyone here ever visits Chicago, skip the pizza. There is a lot of great food in Chicago, but what they call "pizza" definitely is not.
Seems many disagree. Deep is more a Tourist thing. It definitely has to be done right and takes longer to bake.
Not something anyone gets regularly there at all. Thin-crispy is the Midwest common variety. Some of the best I had was there. By me in PA. The thin-wimpy is the common one. NYC varieties basically. One place I found out, you can ask for it made crispy..... and they do it. Makes a difference prefer.

Party-cut just became the common cut in the Midwest. Works over picking up a big wimpy triangle that you need two hands or fold.

Toppings and sauce make a better pizza for me. I still had some best out there. By me also ..... some local places do American cheese topped pizzas too. Not bad actually.

In viewing YouTube vlogs of tourist visits to Chicago and most try deep dish and their style hot-dogs. Most are favorable. But very much a specially version not common with locals.

I can get pizza hut pan pizza with extra sauce and toppings, ask for it well-done and be satisfied. Guess my bar is low.

Never had Deep-Dish when I lived on Chicago's Northwest-side. Only on one visit a few years ago. I had a personal Pan (a lunch deal price) at a popular Deep-Dish pave. But this one had a bar and bewed its own beer. Enjoyed it. Crust was fine. But no toppings and blander then with them.

The best Minestrone soup common with a meal there in the areas I lived. Was still the best I ever had.

To get more a Deep-Dish feel .... next time I visit I think I will do a Pizza-Tour they have. You go to a few Deep-Dish places and get a sample from each. Then I will know better differences between some. Just to be a regular tourist ......

Last edited by DavePa; 09-18-2019 at 08:49 AM..
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:39 AM
 
366 posts, read 137,233 times
Reputation: 583
^^^ I thought Detroit-style was quite good as well. Is it called pan or deep dish? not sure but like you mentioned, being thoroughly cooked and crispy/caramelized is key to those thicker pizza styles.
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