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View Poll Results: Which formerly forlorn sections of the city will see the most transformative changes in the 2020s?
Lower North Philly 10 30.30%
Central North Philly 1 3.03%
Upper North Philly 1 3.03%
West Philly--South of Market 6 18.18%
West Philly--North of Market 3 9.09%
Southwest Philly 2 6.06%
Kensington 9 27.27%
Frankford 1 3.03%
Voters: 33. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-29-2019, 10:37 AM
 
Location: West Philly
45 posts, read 14,242 times
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The Kingsessing neighborhood borders SW Cedar Park which is a very good neighborhood that runs along Baltimore avenue, SouthWest has already seen a luxury apartment building built on 52nd street call the Irving. Not to mention beautiful housing stock through much of the neighborhood. Whites are slowly moving back into Kingsessing.
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Old 10-29-2019, 07:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Von7philly View Post
The Kingsessing neighborhood borders SW Cedar Park which is a very good neighborhood that runs along Baltimore avenue, SouthWest has already seen a luxury apartment building built on 52nd street call the Irving. Not to mention beautiful housing stock through much of the neighborhood. Whites are slowly moving back into Kingsessing.
I never thought the latter would happen but that seems to be true. There are some fantastic houses, in what I call, lower Cobbs Creek as well.
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Old 10-30-2019, 07:56 AM
 
Location: West Philly
45 posts, read 14,242 times
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Yes I agree. Cobbs Creek and Kingessing are primed for a real estate explosion soon. The trolley lines that service the area too convenient to to travel to and from downtown. Not to mention there are tons of trees in the area.
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Old 10-30-2019, 11:28 AM
 
Location: West Philadelphia
25 posts, read 5,971 times
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Furness Lofts, The Irvine, not to mention new construction. Lots going on on the Squirrel Hill - Kingsessing border.
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Old 11-03-2019, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
523 posts, read 205,614 times
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Yeah the whole area south of Market is really fantastic, and Kingsessing really has a lot of potential. I wonder why it does not seem to get a lot of attention on this forum.

I am surprised Germantown did not end up on the poll. Not all of it was ever "gone," but much of it has some real revitalization potential.
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Old 11-03-2019, 02:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Muinteoir View Post
Yeah the whole area south of Market is really fantastic, and Kingsessing really has a lot of potential. I wonder why it does not seem to get a lot of attention on this forum.

I am surprised Germantown did not end up on the poll. Not all of it was ever "gone," but much of it has some real revitalization potential.
Kingsessing started to decline later(80s) than parts of N. Phila . for instance. So I agree it could spring back faster if people paid more attention to it.

Parts of Germantown, closer to Lincoln Drive, have always been fine. So, yes, I agree with you.
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Old 11-04-2019, 10:11 PM
 
1,171 posts, read 372,223 times
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By 2035, Strawberry Mansion will be almost completely gentrified. Broad will be gentrified and desirable up to Erie. Kensington will be like fishtown or Williamsburg. Market will be desirable past 63rd street and up to 69th street. Everything in South Philly will be completely gentrified and desirable. The sports complex area will start seeing construction of large office/mixed use/residential projects.
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Old 11-05-2019, 11:21 AM
 
31 posts, read 6,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muinteoir View Post
Yeah the whole area south of Market is really fantastic, and Kingsessing really has a lot of potential. I wonder why it does not seem to get a lot of attention on this forum.

I am surprised Germantown did not end up on the poll. Not all of it was ever "gone," but much of it has some real revitalization potential.
I suspect people have been saying that for decades now....

Bit of a shame as there is indeed some great housing stock and revitalization potential up there.

Money clearly is following proximity to Center City / the El. That's why places like Point Breeze and Fishtown and now Kensington are outpacing Germantown and Mount Airy in revitalization. The housing stock in the NW is better but that's not drawing people. I find it amazing you can still get nicely maintained, comfortable rowhouses in East Falls for sub 300k while people are paying more than that for cramped and cheaply flipped properties in Point Breeze and Fishtown. But when you realize the difference is proximity to Center City and ease of commute (quick ride of the El rather than a cumbersome Septa train commute) it starts to make sense.

I don't have much confidence in Penn's Landing. Don't ever see that site taking off as a luxurious destination. After all, why? It ain't no Baltimore Inner Harbor. Views are of a dumpy river and Camden. And it's a long way from the heart of moneyed Philadelphia - Rittenhouse Square.

But Schuylkill Yards redevelopment could be a real change for the city. The assets are all there - Penn/Drexel, Market Street CBD, and Penn Station. Real estate around Schuylkill Yards could be a good long term investment, like Powelton Village. Put a bunch more towers along the Schuylkill it would easily become an iconic area, far more so than Penn's Landing or even Naval Yards in South Philadelphia.
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Old 11-05-2019, 11:56 AM
 
Location: West Philly
45 posts, read 14,242 times
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Yes but these areas have some of the best transportation and access to CC. various buses, trolleys and not to mention the Market-Frankford Train. With a very good housing stock. I agree, that the Schuylkill Yards project will transform West Philly. but as Baltimore avenue expands, thus will people expand into Kingsessing.
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Old 11-05-2019, 12:00 PM
 
556 posts, read 403,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
I suspect people have been saying that for decades now....

Bit of a shame as there is indeed some great housing stock and revitalization potential up there.

Money clearly is following proximity to Center City / the El. That's why places like Point Breeze and Fishtown and now Kensington are outpacing Germantown and Mount Airy in revitalization. The housing stock in the NW is better but that's not drawing people. I find it amazing you can still get nicely maintained, comfortable rowhouses in East Falls for sub 300k while people are paying more than that for cramped and cheaply flipped properties in Point Breeze and Fishtown. But when you realize the difference is proximity to Center City and ease of commute (quick ride of the El rather than a cumbersome Septa train commute) it starts to make sense.

I don't have much confidence in Penn's Landing. Don't ever see that site taking off as a luxurious destination. After all, why? It ain't no Baltimore Inner Harbor. Views are of a dumpy river and Camden. And it's a long way from the heart of moneyed Philadelphia - Rittenhouse Square.

But Schuylkill Yards redevelopment could be a real change for the city. The assets are all there - Penn/Drexel, Market Street CBD, and Penn Station. Real estate around Schuylkill Yards could be a good long term investment, like Powelton Village. Put a bunch more towers along the Schuylkill it would easily become an iconic area, far more so than Penn's Landing or even Naval Yards in South Philadelphia.
Very true. People are flocking to the city... to be in the city. Empty-nesters want walk-ability to the Avenue of the Arts, University of Penn lectures, museums, galleries. Millennials are coming here to meet up with friends at coffee shops and pubs, bike from neighborhood to neighborhood and generally live the vibe of a closely connected social scene. The fewer middle-aged couples and families are usually finding themselves looking here because of a new job in a firm right in CC. There isn't much drawl to go the far out-neighborhoods of the city for the privilege of paying city wage tax, especially when many close-in suburbs are the same distance to CC and have grown to the point that they now dwarf out city neighborhoods in regards to amenities and entertainment options. Now with this said, I disagree with you that East Falls is a true out-neighborhood like say Germantown.
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