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Old 11-13-2019, 02:24 PM
 
9,947 posts, read 5,645,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Well said, and exactly what I was thinking. Neither the "affluent" or "left wing liberals" have the corner on culture. Institutions like the PMA and the Orchestra should be and are meant to be patronized by everyone, regardless of social class or political persuasion.

It's depressing that every facet of our society has to be politicized or turned into class warfare these days. And frankly, I blame Fox News as much as I do the New York Times.

We're all actually the same, folks, whether we care to admit or not.
No, we're not the same. We never were. It's fiction to think otherwise. The truth has been laid bare and it's not going away.

 
Old 11-13-2019, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,816 posts, read 26,907,556 times
Reputation: 12060
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
My DC experience did also bring me to every corner of the city, so I didn't isolate myself to a small segment (not that DC is all that massive to begin with). I'll readily acknowledge/experience that my opinion is one of many, just like any individual experiencing any city. And if I've written anything factually inaccurate, please feel free to point that out.
I don't remember every detail from that exchange, but I do remember asking you if you had spent much time around U Street, and you said you hadn't. I agree that DC doesn't feel as "home grown" as Philly but there is a home grown culture there. It just exists in places that many people have no interest in visiting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
There's no doubt that gentrification in Philly is occurring with some displacement, but it doesn't seem anywhere near as pronounced as one finds in a city like DC, with an overwhelmingly AA, relatively poor native population that is often very much at odds with some of the wealthiest, privileged, entitled (largely white) folks in the continental US, and in many cases, the world. A very weird social dynamic in that city, indeed.

As a practical matter, for all of its high-end development of late, Philly remains pretty darn affordable to the standard, middle-class worker--certainly much moreso than DC.
I don't think the issue is whether it's occurring or not, but whether it's by design. Philadelphia has certainly had its fair share of purposeful displacement. University City is arguably a worse example than any in DC since it wasn't a market-driven transformation.

DC actually hasn't seen much displacement, but is rather seeing a large increase in other racial groups that is outpacing the increase in the Black population. DC has pretty strict rent control for all units built prior to 1978. So it's not really an issue of high rents causing displacement.
 
Old 11-13-2019, 03:47 PM
 
366 posts, read 137,233 times
Reputation: 583
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
No, we're not the same. We never were. It's fiction to think otherwise. The truth has been laid bare and it's not going away.
Well, tribalism isn't going to make things better but that's assuming people want things to get better.
 
Old 11-13-2019, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,816 posts, read 26,907,556 times
Reputation: 12060
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Assuming that art and culture are only the province of the well-do-do is also presumptuous.
Yes and no.

The National Endowment for the Arts issues a report on the demographic composition of performing arts audiences every once in a while. Poor families and people of color are under-represented relative to their proportion of the general population, but the under-representation is not that bad all things considered (See Figure 1-2 on Page 4). Where we see a big difference is in the rate of attendance and it should come as no surprise that people with graduate degrees and people with household incomes higher than $150,000 attend events the most often.

https://www.arts.gov/sites/default/f...an2015-rev.pdf

While some of this is without a doubt attributable to differences in income, I suspect that the educational mix of, say, football or basketball audiences looks quite a bit different, and those tickets are pricier than ballet tickets.
 
Old 11-13-2019, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,606 posts, read 7,687,898 times
Reputation: 4527
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
No, we're not the same. We never were. It's fiction to think otherwise. The truth has been laid bare and it's not going away.
I'm referring to our wants, needs, and desires as human beings. You might feel like it's a lost cause, like many, and I can't blame you for that.

But once we get past the pettiness and superficiality of our race, religion, class and political views, we are far more alike than we are different. To me, it's fiction to think otherwise.
 
Old 11-13-2019, 10:08 PM
 
3,743 posts, read 1,802,781 times
Reputation: 2712
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muinteoir View Post
I am trying to decipher this. Sure there are plenty of people not all too interested in the arts, orchestra, opera, and museums in Philadelphia, just as all cities have people who do not have these interests. "In general it is promoting..." who/what is this "it?" The city? Are you saying that as a fact, the city is promoting its arts scene, revitalization, and gentrification? This is no surprise, as most (all) major cities do this. What do you mean by "you try to lessen that?" Lessen that the city is promoting the arts, revitalization, etc (which you seem to have stated as a fact)? Lessen that the city is cultured? I am confused.

Mmmhmm, okay.
What does this mean?
Philly in general has all the criteria ..... that makes it a major US city. Population to ma nor institutions. These include having a Higher-end Arts scene from Opera, Symphony to Museums.

So the claim of somehow less a major city in expectations? Holds no water in having all the criteria including the Arts.

But still a huge portion of the city has this mean little to them. Not unique to Philly of course. But still a large portion. They have a much different version of music to a urban arts scene like wall art.

Some cities have found promoting it on buildings it deems worthy for it to be most admired. Is a great option too for areas.

Gentrification takes on different visible differences in cities. Some blight exist among the renewed for years till total and infill is complete.

Some cities removed worst blight before gentrification or some had change to Latino neighborhoods first.

Philly is hurt by blight reminding years into revitalization on the same blocks. Visitors see blight and it lessens what locals see as great renewal.

Every city has its weaker and stronger points. In what improvements are seen most positive to a visitor who sees that area.

I never see Philly as NOT a large US city. So I do not get the title of the thread. Philadelphia's legacy and long history alone ..... along with its new evolving skyline rising. Meets a Big city criteria.

But gritty has those who expect it less and those who see it as diversity and character in many neighborhoods. NYC can have it and no one bats a eye. But other cities with a lot ..... it takes away if seen as dirty too from them in expectations.

Of course there is a difference going from NYC to Philly. Also DC to Philly in DC having a higher storied no high-rise..... with its height-limits type of city. That some see adds to a big city feel too in 4-6-stories over 2-3-story rows.... that may not. Nor our cities with many single homes. But Cores are a key by far.

But Cores of a city still stand out as what is seen as Big city. Add its most desired neighborhoods. Especially if ringing the Core. Being seen as more urban-form Big city looks. That adds to Big city status.



I don't expect this to be much better. But thanks for asking more.

Last edited by DavePa; 11-13-2019 at 10:21 PM..
 
Old 11-14-2019, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Plymouth Meeting, PA.
4,262 posts, read 2,157,663 times
Reputation: 2024
amen!


Quote:
Originally Posted by PHL10 View Post
Well, tribalism isn't going to make things better but that's assuming people want things to get better.
 
Old 11-14-2019, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
227 posts, read 69,817 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I'm referring to our wants, needs, and desires as human beings. You might feel like it's a lost cause, like many, and I can't blame you for that.

But once we get past the pettiness and superficiality of our race, religion, class and political views, we are far more alike than we are different. To me, it's fiction to think otherwise.
Amen to that.
 
Old 11-14-2019, 10:37 AM
 
559 posts, read 405,900 times
Reputation: 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I'm referring to our wants, needs, and desires as human beings. You might feel like it's a lost cause, like many, and I can't blame you for that.

But once we get past the pettiness and superficiality of our race, religion, class and political views, we are far more alike than we are different. To me, it's fiction to think otherwise.
Very true - much more similar than different. Our differences are man-made and promoted, while all of our millions of similarities are what inherently make us human beings...
 
Old 11-14-2019, 08:35 PM
 
372 posts, read 554,025 times
Reputation: 415
This is JLL's ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JLL_(company) ) impression of Philadelphia : ( https://www.us.jll.com/en/trends-and...-a-global-city ) - Article Date: 11/12/2019
Now if you negadelphians (a term that typically fits many in this Forum) still feel you're living in a non- Big City, move to NY, or Chicago, or LA and let us know after a year or so how you enjoy living 30+% below your Philadelphia standard in a shoebox size apartment. Those who embrace this city, rather than being on a never ending search for a path Over the Rainbow, tend to be super satisfied with their environment.

Last edited by acenturi; 11-14-2019 at 09:03 PM..
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