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Old 02-17-2009, 01:36 PM
 
73 posts, read 306,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
No, I'm actually talking in real life here -- not hypothetical. Allow me to explain.

A lot of people have mentioned Boston and DC as being more "sophisticated" than Philly, due in no small to the lesser presence of the blue-collar class. Yet, I don't find that "sophisticated;" I find that classist. While Boston and Chicago are actually not too far off from Philadelphia in terms of metropolitan demographics, let's not forget what this "sophistication" (a code word for classism) engenders.

In particular, DC is one of the most segregated cities and metropolitan areas in terms of class and race in the country. I have NEVER seen as much income stratification in my life as when I lived here. It's a city that is increasingly reserved for the most powerful and the richest. Boston, while not nearly to the extent of DC, is falling in line with a similar trend. The middle-class is virtually non-existent. Frankly, any city that doesn't provide for a stable middle-class is hardly sophisticated but simply panders to a wealthy elite. I find that pretty backwards, akin to a period of aristocratic rule.

For all that decry the provincial, parochial blue-collar class in Philadelphia, at least they still have a place in the city. Philadelphia prides itself on its class diversity, which is evident throughout many of its neighborhoods. That's more than I can say about a lot of other more "sophisticated" cities.

I don't mean to be too tangential, but I think that is important when discussing "competition." So long as Philadelphia can accommodate people from all different classes and backgrounds, not only can it compete with these other cities -- it will win out.
Good retort and good points. If I have a critique of some of the cities that have been discussed, especially NY, there is the lack or "place" for the working class. That means no real economic diversity.

In any event, I agree with the poster that said Philly is not a world class city. It lacks the real cultural diversity of NY and DC. I've never lived in DC but I know NY has been classified as segregated but it never feels that way in the city- at work, on the train, in school, etc... Philly feels and is segregated. It is, for the most part, a black and white city. There are droppings of other cultures- more than a city like Cleveland- but not enough for my taste. It is bereft of immigrants and filled with natives. And the natives have a nasty attitude. No one can lie about this. This is easily the rudest, nastiest place I have lived. NY always gets rep here but it is extremely overrated.
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Old 02-17-2009, 03:06 PM
 
1,437 posts, read 3,072,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phillyzoo View Post
Good retort and good points. If I have a critique of some of the cities that have been discussed, especially NY, there is the lack or "place" for the working class. That means no real economic diversity.

In any event, I agree with the poster that said Philly is not a world class city. It lacks the real cultural diversity of NY and DC. I've never lived in DC but I know NY has been classified as segregated but it never feels that way in the city- at work, on the train, in school, etc... Philly feels and is segregated. It is, for the most part, a black and white city. There are droppings of other cultures- more than a city like Cleveland- but not enough for my taste. It is bereft of immigrants and filled with natives. And the natives have a nasty attitude. No one can lie about this. This is easily the rudest, nastiest place I have lived. NY always gets rep here but it is extremely overrated.
Great post. I had people in the past to try and argue the fact that Philly is basically a white and black city. Nobody's saying there ain't any immigrants at all there, but it sure ain't no Chicago or NYC. It's nothing more than a big version of Pittsburgh.

Man, did you hit the nail on the head about their attitudes there! They all think they're a bunch of 'tough guys' in Philly. Til you give it back to them, even the women are like that there. It's a toss up between them and Boston for being nasty.

I too think NYC is overrated. No city in the country is like it, but that doesn't mean it ain't "overrated". Especially the day-to-day grind there that most people have to do.
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Old 02-17-2009, 04:24 PM
 
1,031 posts, read 2,708,377 times
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Philly may not be on Chicago or DC economic level but it sure as hell is better than Pittsburgh. You Pittburghers crack me up.
Even in its worse economic times Philly is a more powerful city than Pburgh. Get it straight.
I've been to Dc and as nice as it is, I've never felt like I was in a city that was more "urban". The same with Boston. Someone still has to explain to me what those cities have over Philly other than economic clout because I don't get it. I'm originally from NYC and I will rep NY 'til the day I die so I can understand how NYC will win this comparison. Put NYC against any city and it will prevail.
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Old 02-17-2009, 06:22 PM
 
1,437 posts, read 3,072,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *Sweetkisses* View Post
Philly may not be on Chicago or DC economic level but it sure as hell is better than Pittsburgh. You Pittburghers crack me up.
Even in its worse economic times Philly is a more powerful city than Pburgh. Get it straight.
I've been to Dc and as nice as it is, I've never felt like I was in a city that was more "urban". The same with Boston. Someone still has to explain to me what those cities have over Philly other than economic clout because I don't get it. I'm originally from NYC and I will rep NY 'til the day I die so I can understand how NYC will win this comparison. Put NYC against any city and it will prevail.
Of course Philly is more powerful than Pittsburgh (unless we are talking about SUPER BOWL RINGS!), there's more people. But that's about the only way it will. You think Philly is any more of a culture mecca than Pittsburgh?

NYC will NOT prevail in EVERY catorgory against any city. The standard of living alone and cost of living there is some of the worst in the country for major metro areas.
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Old 02-17-2009, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
7,268 posts, read 10,587,262 times
Reputation: 8823
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillyzoo View Post
In any event, I agree with the poster that said Philly is not a world class city. It lacks the real cultural diversity of NY and DC. I've never lived in DC but I know NY has been classified as segregated but it never feels that way in the city- at work, on the train, in school, etc... Philly feels and is segregated. It is, for the most part, a black and white city. There are droppings of other cultures- more than a city like Cleveland- but not enough for my taste. It is bereft of immigrants and filled with natives. And the natives have a nasty attitude. No one can lie about this. This is easily the rudest, nastiest place I have lived. NY always gets rep here but it is extremely overrated.
Philadelphia may not be "world class" or "cosmopolitan" in the sense of New York or DC, but few -- if any -- other American cities truly are. They are the gold standard -- so I don't find that necessarily to be a fair comparison considering the high standard. However, there has been reports recently about a large upswing in immigration to the Philadelphia area at a faster rate currently than any other Northeastern metro area:

"Among its peers, metropolitan Philadelphia has the largest and fastest growing immigrant population, which now stands at over 500,000, comprising 9 percent of the population. Between 2000 and 2006, greater Philadelphia’s immigrant population grew by 113,000, nearly as many as had arrived in the decade of the 1990s."

Recent Immigration to Philadelphia: Regional Change in a Re-Emerging Gateway - Brookings Institution

This is in addition to a significant increase in international tourism. Although it is rooted in the exchange rate favorable to Europe, it still demonstrates how international visitors are increasingly picking Philly as a prime U.S. destination.

"The U.S. Commerce Department said Philadelphia had a record-breaking 550,000 international visitors in 2007, compared to 434,000 the year before. The Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau, which today will release its annual report and business plan, said the increase in foreign tourists was also seen through May, based on airport passenger surveys and tracking of ATM transactions from foreign-issued bank cards."

2007 boom in foreign visitors for Philadelphia | Philadelphia Inquirer | 07/22/2008

This certainly does not make it a top contender quite yet, but to deny that it is a major metropolitan city that is regaining its international reputation would be purely off-base.

As far as the friendliness factor -- it's all relative. I've met rude and obnoxious people from every corner of this country, and the same goes for friendliness. Philly may have a reputation for gritty and macho attitudes, but I also recall some very friendly gestures by people in Philly that I have never experienced anywhere else.
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Old 02-18-2009, 09:17 AM
 
Location: DC
3,301 posts, read 11,713,391 times
Reputation: 1360
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewGrad2009 View Post
Idk, just any sort of govt work would be fine. Clerical/Admin stuff since I have the most experience with that area. I interned at Amnesty and the SC House of Reps so I feel that gives me some sort of leg up too, but its DC so everyone has more experience than you do, right? I want to do nonprofit, feels more rewarding, but with the economy going how it is, it doesn't sound as secure as federal work.

I looked into Fed Career Intern Programs and it sounds great but it looks too hard to get into. Maybe I should reconsider? My gpa isn't great though, a 2.9, so I don't know my chances.
Clerical/admin stuff is in every agency, so I'd say just apply to everything. Coming straight out of school, no, not everyone has more experience than you because many entry-level positions are geared towards new grads. Besides a brief (and pointless) internship with the DoD I had never had any experience in the government, and no economic experience. I just went to USAJobs.gov, typed in "entry-level", and applied to any GS-5/7 job that came up.

FCIP can be competitive, but again the specific requirements depend on the agency. It's worth a shot, at least. I'm not saying that you shouldn't apply to nonprofits, just keep your options open.

Also, dig up the contact info for anyone you know from your internships and ask around. I'm constantly passing around resumes from friends/acquaintances/friends-of-friends who are looking for econ work. I've even felt around for the friend of someone I met once in a bar (we happened to exchange email addresses).
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Old 02-18-2009, 01:32 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,780 posts, read 21,872,134 times
Reputation: 2355
what r u talking about? Didn't you know that Philadelphia is the city of brotherly love???

Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsteelerfan View Post
G

Man, did you hit the nail on the head about their attitudes there! They all think they're a bunch of 'tough guys' in Philly. Til you give it back to them, even the women are like that there. It's a toss up between them and Boston for being nasty.

I too think NYC is overrated. No city in the country is like it, but that doesn't mean it ain't "overrated". Especially the day-to-day grind there that most people have to do.
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Old 02-19-2009, 06:27 PM
 
73 posts, read 306,346 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankgn87 View Post
what r u talking about? Didn't you know that Philadelphia is the city of brotherly love???
Er, I mean the city of brotherly shove.
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Old 02-19-2009, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,245 posts, read 7,190,164 times
Reputation: 869
Quote:
Originally Posted by *Sweetkisses* View Post
Philly may not be on Chicago or DC economic level but it sure as hell is better than Pittsburgh. You Pittburghers crack me up.
I'm not sure that there is some objective standard for calling one city better than another; and quite frankly I'm a little tired of people from New York or San Francisco or Seattle saying that their city is better than every other city. Isn't this purely a matter of opinion and personal preference?
Now certainly there is an objective measurement of certain features of a city (e.g. size, restaurants, density, diversity, etc.), but who is to say that x more restaurants makes a city better? To many people out there, they'd rather live in a town of 200 than a city of 20 million--to them that town is better. Hell, I'd rather live in any city on the East Coast before New York, if only because its been overrun by elitist phonies from other parts of the country.
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Old 02-19-2009, 08:13 PM
 
1,031 posts, read 2,708,377 times
Reputation: 840
Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
I'm not sure that there is some objective standard for calling one city better than another; and quite frankly I'm a little tired of people from New York or San Francisco or Seattle saying that their city is better than every other city. Isn't this purely a matter of opinion and personal preference?
Now certainly there is an objective measurement of certain features of a city (e.g. size, restaurants, density, diversity, etc.), but who is to say that x more restaurants makes a city better? To many people out there, they'd rather live in a town of 200 than a city of 20 million--to them that town is better. Hell, I'd rather live in any city on the East Coast before New York, if only because its been overrun by elitist phonies from other parts of the country.
I understand what you are saying. But at the same time , I'm also tired of evreyone thinking that NYC is full of elitists. Maybe in Manhattan but in the other boroughs there are people struggling just like people in other cities.
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