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Old 04-17-2012, 06:29 PM
 
Location: playing in the colorful Colorado dirt
4,487 posts, read 2,427,701 times
Reputation: 6796

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptsum View Post
How do you approach a walk in nature? Wow, how do you breathe the air, how do you use your eyes to see, how do you use your ears to listen? Every morning as I go out onto my front porch I listen and hear all the different morning songs of the birds as they awaken to a new day. In the spring, such as now, I see the new life of the newly born spotted fawns or the small rabbits that run around playing with one another, the squirrels running up and down the trees and the birds squawking at them, the sound of the turkeys in a distant field or the whippoorwills and the crows making their calling noise, in the distance I'll see a coyote loping along across one of the upper fields heading for its deen to feed its young pups, a ground hog scoring through the tall grass with a mouthful dry grass for it's borough, the sound of a large red tail hawk circling overhead, on the hunt to feed its young. Sometimes I sit and listen to a gentle rain as the clouds come in over the mountains. Some people from the city will say that it's too quiet in the country but they have never taken the time to sit and listen,it's full of life and it is anything but quiet, all you have to do is take time to listen.
With the sad exception of the rain ( not much around here) you pretty much described my life.

Amazing, isn't it?
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:48 PM
 
Location: playing in the colorful Colorado dirt
4,487 posts, read 2,427,701 times
Reputation: 6796
Just a side note here.

When you go out into the woods, mountains or any unfamiliar place, be prepared.

Take a couple bottles of water and some energy bars. Bring a jacket even if you don't think you need it. Make sure the GPS on your cell phone is enabled. Unless you have the proper equipment and some training, stay off of the big pretty rocks. Tell friends or family where you are going and when you plan on returning. If possible, never go alone.

Where I live, the rescue of unprepared hikers is common. This stretches resources, it's often dangerous and will get you a hefty fine.

Enjoy nature but take care when you do. Oh, please bring out everything you took in.
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
3,334 posts, read 3,298,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pamelaBeurman View Post
Where I live, the rescue of unprepared hikers is common. This stretches resources, it's often dangerous and will get you a hefty fine.
No doubt....flatlanders.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:12 PM
 
Location: playing in the colorful Colorado dirt
4,487 posts, read 2,427,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fullback32 View Post
No doubt....flatlanders.
And the military!

Remember the Pikes Peak thing a few days ago? Soldiersickles!
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
11,299 posts, read 9,922,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hueffenhardt View Post
How do you approach a walk in nature? Do you every go out in nature? If so, do you briskly stomp through the woods (essentially bringing the pace of the city with you)? Is your mind preoccupied with work concerns, or with listening to headphones, so that your mind isn't there with your body in nature? Are you observant with the eyes of a hunter, or with the eyes of a photographer, or with the eyes of a scientist, or with the eyes of a poet/artist, or with the eyes of creationist, or with the eyes of spiritual naturalist?

Nature can be a source of transcendence, peace, awe, comfort, calming, elevation, etc, for many people. But, not so much for other people. Some people just don't have as much of a need for those things as others. Others may not know how to leave the city behind when they enter the woods. Others have a desire to feel transcendence in nature more, but simply don't take the time or make it a priority.

Although I want this thread to focus on how we approach nature, I did want to make the following observation: I suppose some people would say the same about attending religious services. That they can be a source of transcendence and peace for some people, but not so much for others. That some people may not know how to leave the city behind when they enter a chapel. Others may have a desire to feel transcendence at religious services more, but don't take the time or make it a priority.
I remember a specific wilderness survival trip one summer when I was 18. I was dressed head to toe in buckskins I (mostly) tanned and put together myself with a belly full of food I foraged and hunted myself. I hadn't seen an electronic device in 2 weeks (hey, that's a long time for my generation ) and the "real" world back in the city was far, far away. I had just enjoyed a freezing cold bath in a mountain stream when I realized I was completely in tune with the mountain in a way I can never forget and hardly describe.

It wasn't just beautiful, or a feeling of independence, or success, or "Mountain Man" Nostalgia (which was why I was out there in the first place)... it was a feeling of actually being part of it all, no more and no less than all the life surrounding me, and I felt something that may sound silly, but that all humanity seems to suffer secret complexes over... the feeling that I belonged in nature and on the planet.

Anyway I have a hard time being in the woods with noisy people. That's a sacred church if there's ever been one! It doesn't take me long to turn on that normally dormant part of my brain and "plug in" to nature... and I try to do it often.

But I've also come to realize nature isn't just in the backcountry... in truth, there is no "wilderness" or "civilization"... just a single world where lots of people live in some places and almost nobody lives in others. Nature encompasses us all, no matter where we go.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
11,299 posts, read 9,922,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fullback32 View Post
No doubt....flatlanders.
I've gotta laugh... every year here in Utah several people somehow get lost in the Wasatch Mountains and need search & rescue and helicopters to save them. The Wasatch mountains are surrounded by city; 120 miles of it on the West, Park City and dozens of smaller communities on the east, paved roads in all the big canyons, trails everywhere and nowhere in the whole range can you get more than about 10 miles away from a frequented man-made structure. How?! How do you get lost in a place like that? It takes a special kind of stupid, ya know?
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
6,873 posts, read 3,511,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hueffenhardt View Post
How do you approach a walk in nature?
I generally approach on my feet. Usually I leave it the same way.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:42 PM
 
Location: City-Data Forum
3,908 posts, read 1,560,306 times
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I've always been able to walk down the block and inside of buildings as if though they themselves were forests... but without the mosquitoes and chance of ticks.
That might sound bad to some of you, but mosquitoes/flies are really annoying, and my fear of ticks is very real.
I still like forests though, and now that i'm urban and no longer next to a tomato farm, my garden is a great place for the mosquitos to find safe heaven, so they've taken over. I go into my garden and spend time smacking my self and hunting down the mosquitoes while I sit, ponder, enjoy, and rest. My conquest over the mosquitoes makes me happy too, but I always think about how I'm helping them evolve into more agile mosquitoes when I miss killing one. Water falls and fly-fishing rivers would be great, the beaches are too crowded for me to enjoy. But I guess it depends on my mood.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:48 PM
 
6,016 posts, read 4,614,171 times
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I'm an avid hiker, mountain-climber, and backpacker. I usually hike in excess of 500+ miles per year in the various ranges of the rocky mtns (including the wasatch chango spoke about). To me, an athiestic agnostic, it is an almost 'religious' experience. I feel more connected to the world and universe around me, more in tune with myself, and more at peace and 'in balance' when I'm out in the wilderness than at any other time. One really gets to know their own limits and capabilities when they are all alone, 50 miles or more from the nearest town, out in the elements and at the mercy of the weather and their own preparedness. I prefer to be with someone else on my journeys, but there are times I will go alone. Longest I've been alone was a 2 week trip into the high uintas wilderness area. I saw 5 other people during that time, while passing them on the trails. Other than that, I was all alone, just me, nature, and the stars above. What a magnificent experience.

In the daily hustle and bustle, life is just a numb blur. Just going through the motions, running the rat-race, playing the game. Such a waste of time.
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Old 04-17-2012, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Golden, CO
2,108 posts, read 1,388,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuminousTruth View Post
I've always been able to walk down the block and inside of buildings as if though they themselves were forests... but without the mosquitoes and chance of ticks.
That might sound bad to some of you, but mosquitoes/flies are really annoying, and my fear of ticks is very real.
I still like forests though, and now that i'm urban and no longer next to a tomato farm, my garden is a great place for the mosquitos to find safe heaven, so they've taken over. I go into my garden and spend time smacking my self and hunting down the mosquitoes while I sit, ponder, enjoy, and rest. My conquest over the mosquitoes makes me happy too, but I always think about how I'm helping them evolve into more agile mosquitoes when I miss killing one. Water falls and fly-fishing rivers would be great, the beaches are too crowded for me to enjoy. But I guess it depends on my mood.
I grew up in Georgia and the biting flying insects of all kinds were the worst. They really took a lot of the enjoyment of the great outdoors. It did not matter much what bug spray I used, if I drank vinegar, what color clothes I wore, etc. When I moved to Utah, I was so happy to go hiking up the mountains without being bothered by bugs. It was wonderful.

Now I live in Kansas, and although there are some mosquitoes, etc, they are much smaller in number when compared to the hoards in Georgia. Also, I don't have to deal with such stifling, humid, heat.

I live in a semi-rural area with beautiful scenery all around. And I love exploring the nearby woods and prairies. The only thing that gets me here are seasonal allergies in the late summer. I never had allergies in Georgia, or Utah, or Maine/eastern Canada, but the ragweed in Kansas gets me every year and honey and meds only take the edge off of the symptoms.
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