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Old 12-05-2012, 07:23 PM
 
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Why are we so obsessed with trying to find the meaning of life? Deep down, as a christian, I believe we are the product of a loving God who simply wants us to exist in his love. Most other religions have a similar viewpoint. Nothing complex or spectacular. Even from an athiestic standpoint, who defines life's meaning? Why should we accept such a definition? What intrinsic psychological craving does this really satisfy?

I truly believe this question is a offshoot of the personal ego. Anyone agree?
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
I truly believe this question is a offshoot of the personal ego. Anyone agree?
Yes, of course. The thing is, I see nothing wrong in people having a big ego: I know mine is big too.

Where we get into trouble is when we dwell on the inevitable fact that often we try things and fail. One nice thing about life is we almost always get a second chance, but at the time it doesn't seem that way, and so we suffer for awhile.
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Old 12-11-2012, 03:39 PM
 
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Because the answer to this question is related to our identity and life span. Knowing what it means to be a human and what how much time we have in this life, preferably a long time. More over our existence is full of mysteries, strange events, simple, but strange to thd individual. For example the presence of a loved one, the sure and solid assurance of having them and then one day you never see them, they are just no more. That is very very strange. Death is one of the strange things about life.

There is also the matter that as much we are many and common we are still unique individuals. The many are made of many unique individuals. No one person is like the other. Each individual is aware that they are the only one. Each person is a star in their own play, the center of the universe. This subjective nature of experience means we tend to feel alone in varying extents and are aware of this at different times.

It is no wonder that we think about why we are here.
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Old 12-24-2012, 07:48 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
Why are we so obsessed with trying to find the meaning of life? Deep down, as a christian, I believe we are the product of a loving God who simply wants us to exist in his love. Most other religions have a similar viewpoint. Nothing complex or spectacular. Even from an athiestic standpoint, who defines life's meaning? Why should we accept such a definition? What intrinsic psychological craving does this really satisfy?

I truly believe this question is a offshoot of the personal ego. Anyone agree?
But isn't that really just another type of ''Meaning'', especially when in fact many other religions actually have very different viewpoints? For example the judaeo-christian religions are all based on Dualism, the assumption that the universe is the outcome of two eternally opposed and coexisting principles, conceived as good and evil, light and darkness, or some other form of conflicting powers (Heaven & Hell, God vs Satan, etc.).

While the religions based on Monism, like Buddhism and Hinduism, see the universe itself (including us within it) as all part of God and the Divine already, but expressed as many different manifestations and religious traditions... of which christianity is merely only one manifestation. This also means that the notions of good and evil are very different as well.

And that's before we even look at ''Animism'' and similar nature-based religions, perhaps the oldest ones on earth, with various forms still being practiced by everyone from australian aborigines to New Age wiccans! In fact the closest thing to truly having ''no meaning'' would be the Agnostics, who simply go, ''I dunno!''

Last edited by mateo45; 12-24-2012 at 07:59 PM..
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Old 12-25-2012, 03:27 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I think ultimately we all agree on what we'd LIKE this 'meaning' to be. In fact, the question to me smacks of religious questioning. Most non-religious people give an answer that doesn't factor in the 'ultimate meaning', but say something that is relevant to humans, such as to 'enjoy life' or 'enjoy time with loved ones.' The religious will probably say that the worship of God, or the reunion with God or the Universal Spirit, or reaching a state of pure consciousness/enlightenment is the ultimate purpose of Life. Ultimately, we want to reach some state of blissful 'perfection' and without a belief system that promises that we feel we need a 'meaning' to justify the suffering or seeming pointlessness of our existence.
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Old 12-25-2012, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Northeastern US
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The very quest for meaning suggests we don't find life-as-it-is sufficiently meaningful. The question is, why. I think the simplest answer is that mere existence is not a particularly compelling proposition for most of us -- the occasional person blest with happy juice coursing through their viens notwithstanding. Most of us don't leap out of bed most days eager to meet the day, because the day is full of things we've done a thousand times before, many of them not-very-interesting things that just take up time -- things like brushing your teeth, taking a shower, commuting to and from work. Even with the best possible and most creative attitude toward the mundane, it's still the mundane. Sooner or later thoughts of "is this all there is" crop up. We then manufacture stuff to get around the logical answer which is "yes". If we can simply face the "yes" with equanimity, though, it's very liberating. Yes, this IS all there is and that relieves you of the burden of being worthy of some portentous "purpose". It makes things very simple.
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Old 12-25-2012, 09:26 AM
 
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No, sorry, Friend.
You, true YOU, I, we all have innate memory, though so dulled and ineffable, of what we truly are and where we came from. As a result, as we realize what we lost, we seek return to it but, bound by physical and our destinies, simply can not accomplish it. But, as a result, this is causing everlasting desire to find that LOST, and part of it is looking for meaning of life which is, in a nutshell, question - why am I here? I am only referring to TRUE I, or YOU.
This will be resolved in time proper for everyone. Understanding of this and acceptance helps to facilitate the process, haste and rush for solution, only creates a hindrance.

On the side, I wouldn't be concerned with "psychological explanations" as psychology is false science. There is not a single psychologist on Earth that truly knows what human psyche is, and as such, any of their findings is based on false presumptions. Of course, it is very good business, but we are not following THAT route, Friend?

I am glad, you can fathom God's plan. That's something no one ever managed to accomplish either, even Lord Jesus himself, right? Didn't He ask "Why me?" to the very end of His physical existence?
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Old 12-25-2012, 04:11 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,246,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mordant View Post
The very quest for meaning suggests we don't find life-as-it-is sufficiently meaningful. The question is, why. I think the simplest answer is that mere existence is not a particularly compelling proposition for most of us -- the occasional person blest with happy juice coursing through their viens notwithstanding. Most of us don't leap out of bed most days eager to meet the day, because the day is full of things we've done a thousand times before, many of them not-very-interesting things that just take up time -- things like brushing your teeth, taking a shower, commuting to and from work. Even with the best possible and most creative attitude toward the mundane, it's still the mundane. Sooner or later thoughts of "is this all there is" crop up. We then manufacture stuff to get around the logical answer which is "yes". If we can simply face the "yes" with equanimity, though, it's very liberating. Yes, this IS all there is and that relieves you of the burden of being worthy of some portentous "purpose". It makes things very simple.
Still doesn't make it any easier to get up in the morning lol.
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Old 12-25-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Northeastern US
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Still doesn't make it any easier to get up in the morning lol.
Heh ... no, not really. But why layer on top of that, impossible standards, unrealistic goals, etc. When we quit apologizing for just humbly being who and what we are, flaws and all, life becomes much less intimidating and arduous, and we become less affected and more genuine.
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Old 12-25-2012, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Northeastern US
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Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
I am glad, you can fathom God's plan. That's something no one ever managed to accomplish either, even Lord Jesus himself, right? Didn't He ask "Why me?" to the very end of His physical existence?
I don't fathom any such thing, as there is no such plan. And no, he didn't. That's but a story.

The idea that I'm some high and mighty creature that's just forgotten his lineage is an archetype as old as mankind, but not because it has any actual reality -- it's just because it flatters us to think that this is so. It's a very romantic notion. Everyone would love to wake up tomorrow to a phone call informing them that they are the lost heir to a great fortune. But most of us are just working stiffs and need to get over it and use our limited time to deal in reality.
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